Basset Hounds Forum banner

1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi, I'm battling yeast with my basset hound Nelly. I recently went to the vet for her ears and got a prescription. The vet was very slow (2 hours for exam and lab) and wanted another ~$50 to clean her ears on top of the $300 I was already paying, so I decided to do the ear cleaning myself. Thanks to recommendations in this forum, I ordered Oti-Clens ear cleaner, and it's been great for cleaning out earwax. I've used it once so far and will use it several more times before applying the prescription. My hound won't hold still, so it's hard to get all the earwax out in one cleaning, which needs to be done for the prescription to work.

My hound also has armpit (legpit?) areas that look scaly and rash-like. The vet didn't suggest any medication or treatment for it (maybe she was too busy). She also has a few ares between her toes the vet said were yeasty. I ordered the Fresh & Clean oatmeal baking soda shampoo that was recommended in this forum, but I haven't used it yet.

I read online somewhere that dog yeast thrives in fat, not carbohydrates like human yeast does. So I'm wondering, has anyone has gotten rid of yeast through a lower fat diet? I suspect Nelly's yeast problem started when I was using a cheap dog food with a high % of fat. I've noticed canned dog foods are lower in fat, and there are weight management dog foods I'm considering also. I'm currently using Costco mature dog and/or Purina One mixed with a little canned "Chop House" (her favorite).

Is there anyone with a yeast free hound, and if so, what is your hound eating?? And how often is it bathing??

I will check back hopefully soon. Thanks in advance for your replies!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
108 Posts
Hi, I'm battling yeast with my basset hound Nelly. I recently went to the vet for her ears and got a prescription. The vet was very slow (2 hours for exam and lab) and wanted another ~$50 to clean her ears on top of the $300 I was already paying, so I decided to do the ear cleaning myself. Thanks to recommendations in this forum, I ordered Oti-Clens ear cleaner, and it's been great for cleaning out earwax. I've used it once so far and will use it several more times before applying the prescription. My hound won't hold still, so it's hard to get all the earwax out in one cleaning, which needs to be done for the prescription to work.

My hound also has armpit (legpit?) areas that look scaly and rash-like. The vet didn't suggest any medication or treatment for it (maybe she was too busy). She also has a few ares between her toes the vet said were yeasty. I ordered the Fresh & Clean oatmeal baking soda shampoo that was recommended in this forum, but I haven't used it yet.

I read online somewhere that dog yeast thrives in fat, not carbohydrates like human yeast does. So I'm wondering, has anyone has gotten rid of yeast through a lower fat diet? I suspect Nelly's yeast problem started when I was using a cheap dog food with a high % of fat. I've noticed canned dog foods are lower in fat, and there are weight management dog foods I'm considering also. I'm currently using Costco mature dog and/or Purina One mixed with a little canned "Chop House" (her favorite).

Is there anyone with a yeast free hound, and if so, what is your hound eating?? And how often is it bathing??

I will check back hopefully soon. Thanks in advance for your replies!
We have been in that battle for a year now. Tried everything. Yeast under arms, on back of back legs, ears. Keto flush was the only ear thing that worked for her. Nothing the vet gave us or suggested worked so I started looking for simple solutions that did not irritate (and most do). I came up with Cetaphil baby wash, use it every day and it keeps it at bay. The other help was getting her cytopoint injections to help with general itching. Lifesaver, especially in this heat (we are in pollen, yellow dust season here). As for the low-fat diet, I can get back to you on that. She started this a month ago (bout of pancreatitis) and we will see if it affects the yeast. Good luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,869 Posts
"I read online somewhere that dog yeast thrives in fat, not carbohydrates like human yeast does. " Complete and under nonsense the only time diet makes a difference is if there is a food allergy causing an allergic reaction which help allow yeast to flourish. In basset hounds because of loose skin and floppy ears yeast can flourish in these protected moist areas. Bassets are also prone to a genetic skin disease that often goes undiagnosed know as seborrhea. If the basset coat tends toward oily and has dandruff you can rest assured it has seborrhea which has no cure but can be controlled with frequent bathing in antiseborrheic shampoo like Selsun blue
Seborrhea in Dogs: Causes, Symptoms, and Treatment.

For dealing with proliferation of yeast there is usually a primary cause, allergies, skin issue like the one mentioned above , but as I said earlier there are physical characteristic that make a basset more prone as well. Personally I like overall treatment along with spot treatment of the problem areas. but try and avoid using oral antifungals unless absolutely necessary.
1. Frequent bathing with antifungal shampoo. either miconizole
Amazon.com: Davis Miconazole Pet Shampoo, 1-Gallon
or ketoconozole
Amazon.com: Davis KetoHexidine Shampoo Pets, 12 oz
or better yet alternate between both to avoid creating a resistant fungal infection. The most important parts to remember abut these shampoos is theses shampoos do not clean really well. If the dog is dirty was with a regular shampoo first. 2. make sure you work the shampoo to the skin and it has a minimum contact time of 10 minutes. 3. Skin irritation from frequent shampooing is not cause by the frequent shampooing it is caused by inadequate rinsing. rule of thumb is to rinse twice as long as it takes to get a clear running stream ie no visible shampoo residue My experience in the grooming salon is the Ketohex cleans and lathers better and has antibacterial chlorhexidine as well so it is generally our first choice with dogs with active yeast infections. For dogs prone to yeast infections but not currently having one either Colloidal Oat meal or a hypoallergenic enzymatic shampoo like Pet Shampoos : Amazon.com: Zymox Enzymatic Shampoo for Dogs and Cats, 12oz

diet
it is the protein source in a diet that causes allergies. look at any bag of dog food you will not find carbohydrates listed because the are no essential for dogs, Dogs are designed for a high fat diet. There are a number of disease exacerbated by high fat diets pancreatitis mention above is one. but the cause is not a high fat diet it is more like the result of damage done from a high carbohydrate one. The dogs that we have had that have atopic allergies which int urn cause yeast infections have not responded to dietary changes. Which makes sense because diet was not the issue in the first place. Frequent bathing can help with certain atopic allergies because it removes the allergen from skin contact.

2. between bath rinse with distilled vinegar which is quite antimicrobial and gentle and help with dog skin ph balance

3. antifungal powders like atheletes foot powder help dry and treat fungal infections in moist skin folds like arm pits.

4 shaving trim hair between toes and pads of feet to increase air circulation and ease application of treatments

5. use anti fungal ointment where practical and powder dose not work (athlete foot, monistat etc)

6. Yeast infection to to be very itch so using an itch relieve Lidocaine never benzocaine can help prevent skin abrasion from scratching that makes things worse. Amazon.com : Veterinary Formula Clinical Care Hot Spot and Itch Relief Spray for Dogs and Cats – Medicated Topical Treatment for Skin Irritations and Hot Spots - Fast Acting, Heals and Soothes (8oz) : Pet Shampoos : Pet Supplies

7 Itch Relief - Mar Vista Animal Medical Center
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,869 Posts
"Fresh & Clean oatmeal baking soda shampoo" is a fine choice once you get the yeast infection undercontrol but not so much when looking to clear it up use an antifungal shampoo i Have to links to the brand we use in the grooming shop.

Most commonly yeast overgrowth results when the skin is responding to allergy. This will alter the oil production and water content of the skin and change the barrier function of the skin to allow for yeast overgrowth. Hormone imbalances such as hypothyroidism also can alter the skin barrier so that yeast proliferate. There is usually an underlying skin issue that started the yeast infection and yeast infections will likely be a recurrent problem if the underlying skin issue is not controlled.
Malassezia infections are not contagious.

The following breeds are predisposed genetically to yeast infections: the West Highland White Terrier, Basset hound, Cocker spaniel, Silky terrier, Australian terrier, Maltese, Chihuahua, Poodle, Shetland sheepdog, Lhasa apso, and the Dachshund.
the article also details treatment but you will find it pretty much mirrors my protocol above of note what do we mean by frequent bathing "The pet must be bathed twice a week to start and the shampoo requires a 10 minute contact time (meaning do not rinse the lather for 10 minutes). "
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top