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why? from a health and behavioral prospective it is generally better to leave males intact.

https://www.americanveterinarian.co...-differences-in-neutered-and-intact-male-dogs

https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/...vior-changes-when-dogs-are-spayed-or-neutered

http://www.naiaonline.org/pdfs/LongTermHealthEffectsOfSpayNeuterInDogs.pdf
"On the positive side, neutering male dogs
• eliminates the small risk (probably <1%) of dying from testicular cancer
• reduces the risk of non-cancerous prostate disorders
• reduces the risk of perianal fistulas
• may possibly reduce the risk of diabetes (data inconclusive)
On the negative side, neutering male dogs
• if done before 1 year of age, significantly increases the risk of osteosarcoma (bone cancer); this is a
common cancer in medium/large and larger breeds with a poor prognosis.
• increases the risk of cardiac hemangiosarcoma by a factor of 1.6
• triples the risk of hypothyroidism
• increases the risk of progressive geriatric cognitive impairment
• triples the risk of obesity, a common health problem in dogs with many associated health problems
• quadruples the small risk (<0.6%) of prostate cancer
• doubles the small risk (<1%) of urinary tract cancers
• increases the risk of orthopedic disorders
• increases the risk of adverse reactions to vaccinations"

The biggest risk factors associated with being left intact are general more a lack of management with free roaming dogs. So what is being picked up is negligent owners are more likely to have intact dogs and tends to skew the numbers on roaming/hit by car etc toward neutering but these are completely in the control of the owner to prevent.


That said if you do nueter not until after 2 year of age
 

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I have a male Basset hound puppy. I intend to have him neutered. My question is - at what age should I have him neutered?

I saw this heading and had to pile in. When? NEVER. Unless there's medical need (eg retained testicle). This breed should be soft enough without needing to be castrated, which however 'minor' is still surgery with a general anaesthetic. We had to have two oldies done and although this was for a medical reason (prostate flare-ups), I bitterly regretted having to have it done. They both lost any zip they had (which at their age, wasn't much!), tended to grow a heavier coats and put on weight unless closely watched.


I don't know the reason you have for thinking about doing this, but please don't, if it's not for medical need. And certainly NOT until the hound is well over 1 year. The hound must have achieved as much maturity as possible - and these are often not mature physically, until at least 2 years. Castration should never be seen as a replacement for training and proper containment. It only prevents unwanted litters of puppies, which shouldn't ever happen in any case. We had entire males with entire bitches, and NO unplanned litters.


I won't tell you otherwise.:rolleyes:
 

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My vet said around 8-9 months when I asked him last week. I plan to neuter as well.

With the greatest respect (almost), your vet IS WRONG. At the very least, the GROWTH PLATES have to have closed, and you must give a puppy, Basset or not, time to grow up. And in the Basset male especially, this may not happen until he's at least 2 years. I've seen the result of one sired by one of my hounds, castrated at 7 months. He stayed a 'silly puppy' for the rest of his life and believe me, that was a nightmare. Unless there's a physical/medical need (eg retained testicles, and even then it can be left to over a year), PLEASE DO NOT CASTRATE YOUR BASSET. You will regret it.


Castration is not a remedy for bad behaviour - the only 'for sure' with this surgery is no puppies, which again, if the hound is properly contained, will never happen.


Vets who advise this are (all too often!) after INCOME, unless it's for medical need.
 

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My vet said around 8-9 months when I asked him last week. I plan to neuter as well.

With the greatest respect (almost), your vet IS WRONG. At the very least, the GROWTH PLATES have to have closed, and you must give a puppy, Basset or not, time to grow up. And in the Basset male especially, this may not happen until he's at least 2 years. I've seen the result of one sired by one of my hounds, castrated at 7 months. He stayed a 'silly puppy' for the rest of his life and believe me, that was a nightmare. Unless there's a physical/medical need (eg retained testicles, and even then it can be left to over a year), PLEASE DO NOT CASTRATE YOUR BASSET. You will regret it.


Castration is not a remedy for bad behaviour - the only 'for sure' with this surgery is no puppies, which again, if the hound is properly contained, will never happen.


Vets who advise this are after INCOME, unless it's for medical need.
Respectfully (sort of), we will agree to disagree.
 

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Vets who advise this are after INCOME, unless it's for medical need.

This is why I asked you not to respond to posts or questions I may have. I always enjoy it when people try to pass themselves off as experts and it is perfectly obvious - to put it mildly - they are not.


If you knew anything about my vet, you would know he is not in it for "income." So, don't try to tell us that you know more than vets know and I'll thank you not to respond in posts I submit again - ever.
 

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This is why I asked you not to respond to posts or questions I may have. I always enjoy it when people try to pass themselves off as experts and it is perfectly obvious - to put it mildly - they are not.


If you knew anything about my vet, you would know he is not in it for "income." So, don't try to tell us that you know more than vets know and I'll thank you not to respond in posts I submit again - ever.

Oh now I remember who you are and, if I continue to remember when I come on here, I'll be very happy not to answer your questions EVER AGAIN. *

Just to add I have had Bassets since 1972, on two continents, as pets, showing, breeding and judging. If that doesn't mean I have gained some knowledge of the breed, I don't know what does. I'm not passing myself off (RUDE) as anything (I don't need to). I just know I know a thing or two about this breed and that all too often vets only know about THEORY. I do agree that, obviously, I don't know your particular vet however, or what is his motivation......:confused:. Or what is his EXPERIENCE with the Basset either. I do wonder why, if you/your know it all (re Bassets specifically) and somebody who has been in the breed for as long as I have, doesn't, why you bothered to ask a question like this in the first place.

DO NOT NEUTER BEFORE A YEAR, AFTER THE GROWTH PLATES HAVE CLOSED - IF IT'S NECESSARY AT ALL.

ps This is a public forum and anybody is entitled to add a comment/offer advice (free!) within the Rs and Rs of the forum. If you don't like, move on. Thinking more about this neutering or not question .... and because more than just you read comments on this forum *, I would be interested to know for what reason, other than medical?, your vet feels your puppy needs castration which is surgery with a general anaesthetic and the recovery afterwards (albeit not as significant as when a bitch is spayed). Unless you have to neuter where you live? It is a fact that in maybe all too many cases, vets do make a nice living out of neutering dogs - often for no other good reason than bringing in income. Having been there and done that, for medical need with two oldies, I bitterly regretted having to have it done because both hounds lost their previous zip, and more. It would be a pity to reduce what should be a noble hound to being a silly puppy all his life.
 

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"so, don't try to tell us that you know more than vets"

When it comes to behavioral issues, breed specific issues, Nutrition, training and countering cultural dogma vets rarely are you best source of accurate information.

While there are vets that are up on the latest studies and the link of Neutering especial Juvenile Neutering and the mounting evidence from peer reviewed studies that it is associated with negative heath outcomes One must be highly Suspect of Any vet that recommends Neutering before full Maturity (i.e. 2 years of age) of not keeping up with the latest info. Which is why I supply links to these studies and meta analysts done by vets as well. and the conclusion are always the same. Neutering is linked to overall poorer health outcomes than leaving intact. But in the US specifically there is a huge cultural basis against intact male dogs. and such dogs may be excluded from boarding facilities/ dog parks and the like. So I understand on an individuals Lifestyle choices they may have little choice in whether or not to nueter, If you do Neuter it should not be until full maturity, I.e 2 year of age.

Problem many people come on Here and Aks question like this and get the learned answer and explanation for people Like Franksmom that has 4O+ YEARS experience in the breed or my Wife with 30 + years breeding. and Myself over 30 Year with the breed in most dog sports just not breeding, and when they don't get the the answer they were expecting or con forms to there cultural, and cognitive bias. (like nueter is important to prevent pet overpopulation, one dog over population in US is myth if this were an issue we would not be importing street dogs from asian and other slums importing in also sot of epidemics like the Asian dog Flu. an asian strain of distemper there is no vaccine or and multiple instance of importing rabid dogs. )

So I highly suggest when you ask a question you keep an open mind to the answers you receive. and do some investigation on those answers and what is/was the thought process and evidence supporting thoose answers rather than dismiss them It is the only way to make an educated decision for dog and the unique situation that it find itself in.

Lets look at the facts testicular cancer and Hemangiosarcoma. occur roughly at at same rate in intact male dogs Testicular cancer however is easily detected, rarely malignant and easily cured by neutering. While on the other Hemangiosarcoma is usually malignant. not easily detected. in around 40-50 % 0f case the first inkling the dog has cancer is when tumor ruptures and the dog is rushed to the vet in emergency situation and bleeds to death in transit or shortly there after at the vet. So preventing Testicular cancer by nutering a negligible effect on longevity. but a Doubling of the Hemangiosarcoma rate as a much bigger and more dire effect on longevity. This one cancer alone should be enough to dissuade some one from Neutering but there re at least a half dozen other serious cancers that neutering is known to significantly increase risk. Neuter increase death by cancer significantly this is undisputed. If one wants the best for their dog they can not dismiss this risk out of hand. For me there would have to be some very compelling reason to take on the significant added risk and being accepted to daycare, boarding or dogpark facility is not not that compelling, however I can see others making a different choice but the fact are black and white clear. Neutering is a significant heath risk to the dog. and there are other issues as well the actual counter commonly held beliefs. ie intact makes are more aggressive and more likely to bite than neuter males, when actual studies have show just the opposite is true,. and for The myth that neuter reduces humping https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/animal-emotions/201903/why-do-dogs-hump


and a slightly different from the US perspective on cultural biases as it relates to spay and neuter
https://jennifermargulis.net/norwegians-believe-spaying-or-neutering-a-dog-is-cruel/

http://sciencenordic.com/should-dogs-be-neutered


and one vets opinion that mirrors the advice we have given.

https://www.peakanimalhealthcenter.com/the-dark-side-of-spaying-and-neutering/

https://ivcjournal.com/spay-neuter-alternatives/
"Stepping back from the debate, it is not surprising that the loss of natural gonadal hormones has significant health implications for the dog. As veterinary practitioners, it makes sense for us to understand and discuss the pros and cons of gonadectomy with clients when decisions about sterilization are made. This individualized approach is supported by the American College of Theriogenologists.10

This doesn’t require locking into adversarial positions or giving up spay/neuter. Fortunately, there are a number of alternative methodologies to consider, including methods for sterilizing dogs while maintaining hormone levels. The next step is to evaluate the different options available to the dog owner or adopter, and determine the best option for the particular dog and situation."
 

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Lol, you are posting on a public forum, anybody can answer, not just those who agree with you.

I'm going to add my vote for "never". However, if you must, I would wait until a minimum of 18 months, preferably closer to two years.

Franksmum has a lot of experience and knowledge, and I'm sure could teach some vets a thing or two regarding bassets.
 

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Lol, you are posting on a public forum, anybody can answer, not just those who agree with you.

What does my question have to do with agreeing or disagreeing? A simple question and then a lecture from someone who sees himself as God's gift to Basset Hounds.


If someone wants to debate whether a male Basset should or should not be neutered, it would be appropriate to do that on a separate topic. I don't see how hijacking the topic I started to present lectures that have nothing to do with answering a simple question is the appropriate thing to do - public forum or not - especially when I already said I intend to have my dog neutered.



In any case, I have seen the answers people who actually answered my question have provided and, by the way, they agree with what my vet says - at least 18 months to 2 years.


And nobody here can have any idea what my vet does or does not know about Basset Hounds.



I've said my piece. I have my answers and now I'm done with this topic. So, those who want to lecture, go ahead and lecture to your heart's content.
 

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I saw this heading and had to pile in. When? NEVER. Unless there's medical need (eg retained testicle). This breed should be soft enough without needing to be castrated, which however 'minor' is still surgery with a general anaesthetic. We had to have two oldies done and although this was for a medical reason (prostate flare-ups), I bitterly regretted having to have it done. They both lost any zip they had (which at their age, wasn't much!), tended to grow a heavier coats and put on weight unless closely watched.


I don't know the reason you have for thinking about doing this, but please don't, if it's not for medical need. And certainly NOT until the hound is well over 1 year. The hound must have achieved as much maturity as possible - and these are often not mature physically, until at least 2 years. Castration should never be seen as a replacement for training and proper containment. It only prevents unwanted litters of puppies, which shouldn't ever happen in any case. We had entire males with entire bitches, and NO unplanned litters.


I won't tell you otherwise.:rolleyes:
For those of you who answered not to neuter, I have a question... Did you find that the boy gets more aggressive or marks a lot inside your house or when visiting friends once he matured? Was he as loveable and snuggly once he matured? I'm honestly curious. I've just started hearing of the newer theories of either leaving them intact, or at least waiting till 2 years, but there is so many people out there saying the older they are, the more aggressive they'll be, the less lovable they'll be and the more they'll mark. So I'm so torn and would love to hear your thoughts. :) Thanks in advance!
 

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Marking is the one of a few behavior that is effected by nuetering wandering is the other. The influece nueter has on marking behavior has no effect on when the nueter is done,. Nueter early does result in less marking behavior than nuetering later. Most males can be taught not to mark. but if it becomes and issue you can nueter later without it effecting result/ approximately 65% of marking behavior is resolved by nuetering, Intact males are less agressive than Nueter males. the only agression related to sex hormones is Male Males agression related to opportunity to mate,. So unless you have multiple intact males in the same househoild with intact females this is not an issue. There are countries in Europe l/ike Norway that forbid spay and nueter unless related to a current health is./ ie pyoderma in females, testicular cancer and males and what you worry about is not an issue.

The biggest issue with not Nuetering male dogs in USA is the backwards thinking of mosty Dog kennels and Day cars that won't accept intact dogs.

http://www.naiaonline.org/uploads/WhitePapers/SNBehaviorFarhoodyZink.pdf
"Behavioral characteristics of intact male and female dogs were compared with those of four groups of neutered dogs: those neutered at or before 6 months, between 7 and 12 months, between 13 and 18 months, and after 18 months. Our data showed that the behavior of neutered dogs was significantly different from that of intact dogs in ways that contradict the prevailing view. Among the findings, neutered dogs were more aggressive, fearful, excitable, and less trainable than intact dogs. "

look at it this way would you rather live you life with another adult or a Perpetual teenager, can't thing of many that opt for the emotional less stable teanager for a long term relationship.,

Aggression toward Familiar People, Strangers, and Conspecifics in Gonadectomized and Intact Dogs
"Aggressive behavior was defined (a) using mean scores for all questions on the C-BARQ for aggressive behavior (range 0–4) and (b) comparing dogs with no aggressive behavior (all questions answered 0) to dogs with moderate or severe aggression (at least one score of 2, 3, or 4). Data for intact dogs were compared with those for dogs gonadectomized at 6 months or less, 7–12 months, 11–18 months, and >18 months. Neither gonadectomy nor age at gonadectomy showed an association with aggression toward familiar people or dogs. However, there was a low but significant increase in the odds of moderate or severe aggression toward strangers for all gonadectomized dogs compared with intact dogs, but this effect was driven entirely by data for dogs gonadectomized at 7–12 months of age, which were 26% more likely to demonstrate aggression toward strangers. This large, comprehensive study of the relationships between gonadectomy and aggressive behavior in dogs demonstrates that when the many factors affecting aggressive behavior are considered, there is no evidence that gonadectomy at any age alters aggressive behavior toward familiar people or dogs, and there is only a minimal increase in aggression toward strangers. "

https://www.researchgate.net/public...ideo_Analyses_Questionnaires_and_Case_Studies
The non-castrated males show more
behaviour indicating high status. The results of the questionnaires indicate a trend that neutered
males react emotionally more unstable in stressful situations and the case studies show a
tendency for aggressive behaviour and fear to be more frequent in castrated dogs.
Conclusion: Our results support the assumption that castration may have a negative influence
on the behaviour of male dogs. Neutered dogs may gain attractiveness for intact dogs which
can lead to a high stress factor for the castrates. Accordingly, dog owners should be aware of
the consequences for the dog.


 

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The most aloof and non snuggly bassert I have owned was a male basset hound nuetered around 6 months of age. And he became more aloof and less snuggly the older he got.
Can you help… you seem to know a lot about bassett puppies… how can I train them not to mark? Out of fear I didn’t really let him outside a great deal until he was vaccinated because there is a high prevalence of parvo in this area.. I leave his doggy door open now but he still urinates and defecates all over the house.
 

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defecating in the house is not marking, it is not being house trained, Bassets are notoriously hard to house train but the first step is to prevent accidents, that mean confinement when not immediately supervising and putting them out frequently. see

" 12 wk puppy who is busy playing may need to urinate every 15-20 minutes, whereas a resting puppy might go for an hour, and a sleeping puppy can go 8 hours at night. Activity makes urine! Activity makes urine! Repeat this 10 times, slowly. This is a very important lesson for new puppy owners "

..."The behavior behind this training: Dogs develop substrate preferences for eliminating. By substrate, I mean what they feel under their feet. In their first few weeks of life they need their mother to lick them to stimulate elimination. Around 4 weeks of age they begin to control this themselves. It is a self-rewarding behavior because it feels good. They associate this good feeling with the environment they are in at the time. This is about the same time they are walking well enough to go outside. If they are taken outside enough, several times a day, during this period of development (4 through 8 weeks) they will associate the good feeling of relieving themselves with the grass under their feet, the sky above, and all the smells and sounds of the outdoors. The tactile experience, the texture under the feet, becomes the cue.

If your puppy does not already have this outdoor experience, then you can provide it for him now, to retrain the "substrate preference" he has already learned. Take the pup out about once per hour. This is after play, eating, sleeping, etc. If the puppy can't hold his urine from the crate to the back door while walking, carry him for the first week or so. After a busy play session, take the puppy out, even if it's only been 15 minutes since he last went out. Physical activity produces urine. Inactivity slows the production of urine. This is why a puppy can sleep all night without wetting in the crate, but will urinate on the floor as soon as you let him out of the crate."


Because he does not have the outdoor experience early you need to retrain a substrate preference and unlearn the current one which makes it harder than starting from scratch. The reason the doggy door is not an asset is because the dogs substrate preference is for indoors not outdoors.
 
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