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Discussion Starter #1
Looking at lots of photos...found two of one dog that illustrate my problem understanding rear ends . Stacked with rear pasterns /hocks straight, the rear is high....stacked with level back, the rear legs slope under the dog. Low in front? Wrong rear angulation? What is going on here?

Can't figure how to insert photos, so attatched them....hope this works...THANKS
 

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1. the stack in the first picture to me looks like the tear legs can be set further back to get the pastern to 90 degrees to the table it look like to me this would lower the rear slightly but not so it it level

2. still photo are not the best way to judge conformation hands on is alway better and video of movement is better than still photos.

3. You can haven a perfect front and a perfect rear in isolation but have a dog out of balance because they are miss matched. Being high in the rear is not an uncommon fault in the rear. It is not easy to get a perfect topline. being straight in the rear can cause the dog to be high in the rear, but bone length of the rear compared to the front is just as important. IMHO there has been a tendency to over agulation in the rear which can produce incorrect but flashy invoque super reach and drive. The Modern-Day Fairy Tale: The Myth Of Reach And Drive | Petcha


4. Often see the top line level out when in motion more important for a level top line when the dog is in motion.


http://www.basset-bhca.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=325:the-basset-hound-illustrated-standard&catid=68&Itemid=119
 

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Apart from the fact that those two photos were probably taken at different ages, the first looking younger than the second, stacking is one thing, but what happens ON THE MOVE quite another. If you look at the two, the handler has set her up with the front 'further back' in the second photo, than in the first and she looks more balanced with her rear legs not quite as dragged back as is popular in stacking these days. Fact is a clever handler can disguise a fault in the stack, but again, once on the move, all is revealed.

I remember going to a Specialty show in Detroit years ago and standing ringside watching the Champions Class, all in the stack thinking WOW! Once asked to go round, I began to wonder whether I was seeing the same hounds!!

That hound is rather bum high as a youngster, but not so much, once mature.
 

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""Fact is a clever handler can disguise a fault in the stack,"


Why Miriam Liked outdoor shows when showing deela who was also high in the rear, find a depression for placing the rear
 

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"Fact is a clever handler can disguise a fault in the stack, but again, once on the move, all is revealed."

the opposite can happen as well especially with newer handlers that are not well versed in stacking. Any Time I'm forced to show, the dogs always look better moving. I'm horrible at stacking.
 

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""Fact is a clever handler can disguise a fault in the stack,"


Why Miriam Liked outdoor shows when showing deela who was also high in the rear, find a depression for placing the rear
Ditto!! And that's just one of the 'showing to their best advantage' tricks. Like going away in a curve so the judge doesn't get a full on look at the back end (except a knowing judge won't be fooled :p) and ditto coming towards. There was another I used with one of mine with her great front - get in the ring at the head of the line-up (supposing they didn't go by entry numbers) and with a hound with a good back end, standing at the end of the line-up. Mind you that backfired big time at one Crufts when, because I was in the previous class and had to wait for the critique to be written, my sig.other bought my Open class entry in, but not fast enough so she stood further back than at the front. The silly old judge started making her cut, turned to the ring steward and said 'how many have I pulled out' ... was told, and promptly walked to the end of the line and pulled out the last two, leaving behind my Champion bitch, and another top winner to come out with the rubbish. We was NOT amused.

Oh and Mikey, get practising stacking in front of a full-length mirror - that way you can see what the judge sees!!
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Got kinda busy and went AWOL. Thanks for the comments. Yes, stacking a dog is an "art". I had a bitch with a saggy top line and actually got her to learn to suck it up. Too funny....she loved to show, would "eye" the judge.

The dogs I have seen with this build seem to look level on top in moving but the rear does not have the extension or "push off" that I like to see. When the dog is standing naturally, the rear pasterns slope under the dog. I am thinking that the rear does not match the front, maybe has to do with the angle of the pelvis??? but still not sure what is going on....
 

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Got kinda busy and went AWOL. Thanks for the comments. Yes, stacking a dog is an "art". I had a bitch with a saggy top line and actually got her to learn to suck it up. Too funny....she loved to show, would "eye" the judge.

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Hehe. I had one who was very relaxed in the ring, and tended to dip - I'd stick a finger in her ribs to get her to tighten up - gently of course :eek: All tricks which are 'fine' in the stack, but again all will be revealed on the move - to the knowledgeable.
 
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