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Discussion Starter #1
Hi there, newbie here. We are looking to get a basset hound puppy and just wanted to ask, are there any common breed specific issues we should look out for? For example, I know some breeds are more prone to knee problems so you may want to ask the breeder about knee problems in the family tree.

What about training and diet wise? A friend bought a Jack Russell and really struggled with housebreaking for months, then found out that this particular breed is known to be harder to housebreak than most. She said if she knew earlier and read about it, she may have approached it slightly differently.

We could be just overthinking things, but any insights about this particular breed would be very much appreciated !
 

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Buying a puppy Basset

The answers to your questions would fill a book - and there are a number of good books on the breed available - often second hand on Amazon. But basically you should begin by finding a good reputable and knowledgeable breeder, usually best via the Breed Club where you are (Breed Clubs have Codes of Ethics which should rule out a BYB!!). If you make an appointment to go visit, most breeders should be prepared to sit with you and answer all your questions, show you their adults (look at them because puppies, especially for me, Basset puppies are ALL aaaah must haves). We all want our puppies to go to the best possible homes and for the homing to work.

Just be warned, once you have one, it won't stop there :D

Oh and there are tests for Bassets, health-wise, but in general Bassets..

Can suffer with gastric torsion (GDV) so once adult, do best on two smaller meals a day. And not being exercised for 2 hours after a feed, or fed less than 1 hours after coming home from exercise.
Can suffer with epilepsy - it is in the breed
Can have glaucome - there is a test, gonioscopy, to rule out a predisposition to this
Do need to be exercised carefully up to 6 months of age (only romping around) and then gradually build up their muscle tone via more organised road work so they reach a year, still sound
Do suffer with Pano - a disease of the long bone which does run in some bloodlines.
Can be said to be stubborn, but if you get that, you need to alter your approach to training :p
Can have skin problems.

And so on although basically this is a comparatively problem-free breed when compared to some.

Again, find yourself a good breeder!
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thank you FranksMum!

Sorry I knew it was a bit of an open question, so to fully answer it would be like writing a book. But most of the info I found online are a bit more generic rather than breed specific. So your list is definitely a great start, thank you.

Can't promise if I have enough patience to read through an entire book about one dog breed, but may I ask what is the title of the one you would recommend?
 

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I second the suggestion that you don't find a puppy, you find a breeder. If you find a good breeder, pretty much any puppy is a good bet. While there are no absolute guarantees (we're dealing with living creatures after all), your chances of a healthy, sound and stable pup are much higher when dealing with a good breeder. Preferably see the breeder when they don't have puppies, but meet their adults and see if those are the kind of dog you want. It's too hard to think straight when you are looking at a bunch of cute puppies.
 

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I second the suggestion that you don't find a puppy, you find a breeder. If you find a good breeder, pretty much any puppy is a good bet. While there are no absolute guarantees (we're dealing with living creatures after all), your chances of a healthy, sound and stable pup are much higher when dealing with a good breeder. Preferably see the breeder when they don't have puppies, but meet their adults and see if those are the kind of dog you want. It's too hard to think straight when you are looking at a bunch of cute puppies.
Thanks for the advice! We will speak to a few more breeders locally and hopefully the wait isn't too long.

You are damn right about not able to think straight in front of a bunch of puppies........I can totally imagine myself screaming "TAKE ALL MY MONEY! I NEED TO TAKE ALL OF THEM HOME!"
 

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Books -
It would depend really on where you are but to be honest THE best book I have in my collection would be a small one by E. Fitch Daglish which is probably out of print. Published by Foyles UK and titled The Basset Hound (naturally!)

Then there's Marianne Nixon's The Basset Hound, again UK which has a good mix of the various kennels (LOT OF INCORRECT info. here and who did the proof reading on that section needs shooting) but she does cover general info which the new owner should find helpful.

Jeanne Rowett Johns published a book 'All About the Basset Hound' years ago and that has a lot of useful new owner info. UK

Then there's Margaret (Peg) Walton's book The New Basset Hound - USA

Bob Booth (US) produced a huge and rather expensive (new) book on the breed which has loads of info. about various kennels, including others outside the US. But again it's more for those who want to learn about the kennels that influenced the breed over the years. Titled 'The Official Book of the BH

For 'lighter' reading, Diane Morgan penned a book called The Basset Hound Owner's Survival Guide'. US.

And then there's the old standards by George Johnson UK and Mercedes Braun, US.
 

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Please check out the Basset Hound Club of America website, there is an area there to find breeders in the U.S., and a lot of information on the breed. Do find a reputable breeder, beware there are backyard breeders out there who will say there pups come from champion lines. Frankly, most registered dogs have champions in the background. Do they show their dogs? How many litters do they have a year? Few reputable breeders breed constantly.....so beware of another litter coming soon and asking for a deposit.

A reputable breeder will ask about YOU...do you have experience with dogs, do you have a fenced yard....do you have kids, where will the dog be during the day? Who will be in charge of training the pup? Frankly good things to consider when getting ANY pup. Take your time and learn about the breed....the ears and skin do need attention to avoid yeast infections...and those toenails are some kind of tough to clip! It also takes some extra patience to train a basset...they have minds of their own....and will likely train you. But no other breed for us now.....
 

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Thanks for the advice! We will speak to a few more breeders locally and hopefully the wait isn't too long.

You are damn right about not able to think straight in front of a bunch of puppies........I can totally imagine myself screaming "TAKE ALL MY MONEY! I NEED TO TAKE ALL OF THEM HOME!"

LOL, normally if I'm meeting someone for the first time while I have puppies I talk with them, release the hounds on them, tell them all about Bassets and puppies, and then send them home to think about it for at least 24 hours. You'd be surprised how many people who were begging me to take their money and give them a pup change their minds when they've had a chance to actually think about what they're getting into.
 

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" Few reputable breeders breed constantly.....so beware of another litter coming soon and asking for a deposit."


think that is way to big of a brush. there are generally at least a few very large Kennel in each breed that have the resource to do frequent breeding well and are often the driving forces in improving the breed.

Taking or not taking deposits for pending or up coming litter is very personal personally we do not do it cuz you never no if a liter is going to have a dog/puppy that is right for that individual and IMHO a deposit puts pressure on the breeder and the maker of the deposit to take a dog that is not the right fit,

Beauchasseur Bassets https://www.facebook.com/beauchasseur.bassets https://perfectpets.com.au/p/beauchasseur-kennels-basset-hound-breeder-south-australia/Lower+Light--SA/263 don't know these individual specifically but they are tied in to Topsfield and Claudia Orlandi here in the states, and you can ask for a much higher recommendation than that,
 

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"For 'lighter' reading, Diane Morgan penned a book called The Basset Hound Owner's Survival Guide'. US."


I like this one for one reason for newbies to the breed. unlike most the other type of breed books this on is much better at painting a picture of what day to day living with bassets is like. It is not a book that is intended as a how to a many of the other breed specific books are, but for deciding if bassets are a breed worth considering as a permanent member of the household I don't think there is a better book out there
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Books -
It would depend really on where you are but to be honest THE best book I have in my collection would be a small one by E. Fitch Daglish which is probably out of print. Published by Foyles UK and titled The Basset Hound (naturally!)

Then there's Marianne Nixon's The Basset Hound, again UK which has a good mix of the various kennels (LOT OF INCORRECT info. here and who did the proof reading on that section needs shooting) but she does cover general info which the new owner should find helpful.

Jeanne Rowett Johns published a book 'All About the Basset Hound' years ago and that has a lot of useful new owner info. UK

Then there's Margaret (Peg) Walton's book The New Basset Hound - USA

Bob Booth (US) produced a huge and rather expensive (new) book on the breed which has loads of info. about various kennels, including others outside the US. But again it's more for those who want to learn about the kennels that influenced the breed over the years. Titled 'The Official Book of the BH

For 'lighter' reading, Diane Morgan penned a book called The Basset Hound Owner's Survival Guide'. US.

And then there's the old standards by George Johnson UK and Mercedes Braun, US.
Wow, that's one comprehensive list! Thanks for sharing, I probably can't read them all at once, but will definitely save that list in case I run into problems later down the track.
 

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Please check out the Basset Hound Club of America website, there is an area there to find breeders in the U.S., and a lot of information on the breed. Do find a reputable breeder, beware there are backyard breeders out there who will say there pups come from champion lines. Frankly, most registered dogs have champions in the background. Do they show their dogs? How many litters do they have a year? Few reputable breeders breed constantly.....so beware of another litter coming soon and asking for a deposit.

A reputable breeder will ask about YOU...do you have experience with dogs, do you have a fenced yard....do you have kids, where will the dog be during the day? Who will be in charge of training the pup? Frankly good things to consider when getting ANY pup. Take your time and learn about the breed....the ears and skin do need attention to avoid yeast infections...and those toenails are some kind of tough to clip! It also takes some extra patience to train a basset...they have minds of their own....and will likely train you. But no other breed for us now.....
Thanks PollyEster for the info! Will definitely check out their website.

Yes, I have been told many times that a good breeder has a LOT of control over various aspects of a puppy. Besides the obvious genetic health issues, some said that general temperament and many common behavioral issues can be largely addressed through careful breeding and early conditioning by the breeder.

Basically they are saying, if you manage to get a really well bred dog, 80% of your problems are solved. Not sure how much of that I should believe though.

So we will definitely take our time in searching for a good breeder.
 

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"For 'lighter' reading, Diane Morgan penned a book called The Basset Hound Owner's Survival Guide'. US."


I like this one for one reason for newbies to the breed. unlike most the other type of breed books this on is much better at painting a picture of what day to day living with bassets is like. It is not a book that is intended as a how to a many of the other breed specific books are, but for deciding if bassets are a breed worth considering as a permanent member of the household I don't think there is a better book out there
Thanks Mikey T, will def keep that one on my short-list.
 

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In remark about next litter coming soon, I was referring to local ads I see for the Easter pups, and another litter next month, kind of like a holiday sales pitch....so get your money down today. Gross. Just beware of anyone who wants your money and doesn't care about who YOU are.
 

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Actually I saw in my local news that there's been an increase in outright puppy scams. Basically they advertise popular breeds for sale on FB or local forums at very attractive prices and target interstate buyers, so they make you pay before they ship the dog. Obviously you know what happens next, no dog and they disappear.
 

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To legally ship dogs to buyer that has not seen it in person the Seller must be Licensed by the USDA as either a breeder or distributer.
 

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To legally ship dogs to buyer that has not seen it in person the Seller must be Licensed by the USDA as either a breeder or distributer.
I believe there's a similar rule where we are (in Australia), but I guess a lot of people are not aware of it and never checked. Plus people can be quite careless when they are desperate for a puppy before x'mas etc. If the scammers keep sending them cute puppy pictures, it's not hard to imagine why some would fall for it.
 

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If you are dead-set on a pure-bred dog and you're following all of the advice flibbertygiblet has mentioned, when you are doing your research be sure to understand the types of diseases and maladies that are common with your breed! Responsible breeders will openly state these diseases and that they have documented the test results for their own animals.

Hips and eyes are the most common ones, but cancers are frequent in many breeds as well as things like mitral valve disease (Cavalier King Charles Spaniels).

Ask your breeder if you can return the puppy after you have your own vet screen it--if they say yes, that's another sign of a good breeder.
 

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If you are dead-set on a pure-bred dog and you're following all of the advice flibbertygiblet has mentioned, when you are doing your research be sure to understand the types of diseases and maladies that are common with your breed! Responsible breeders will openly state these diseases and that they have documented the test results for their own animals.

Hips and eyes are the most common ones, but cancers are frequent in many breeds as well as things like mitral valve disease (Cavalier King Charles Spaniels).

Ask your breeder if you can return the puppy after you have your own vet screen it--if they say yes, that's another sign of a good breeder.
Thanks for the info. Yes I have heard that in US, breeders could have their dogs "certified" where they are checked for the most common genetic problems. Unfortunately there are no such thing in Australia, and a lot of breeders don't have written test results to show, I just have to take their word for it.

Yea I think I can probably ask a breeder if I could return the pup if the vet finds anything. But vets are pretty expensive in Australia, my last dog had a blood test done when he was sick, at the end they found nothing and no treatment was needed, it still costed me $350!
 

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There is only one genetic test for basset hounds in US Only
done at Auburn University there is a genetic test
in UK for open angle Glaucoma which we do not
see in US and the form here as not come up with
a single or multiple test. Eye exam, gionscopy and
even High resolution ultrsound are not all that
predictive. Best guide is broadbased pedigree analysis
by knowing whatcondition the dog ansester carried by know any conditions in off spring /relatives/ off spring of relatives http://www.vetmed.auburn.edu/wp-content/uploads/2015/01/BassetWebInfo.pdf

OFA hip , elbow and to a lesser extent eye are not helpful in the breed OF hip and elbow are useless for all dwarf breeds as it does not take into account the effect dwarfism has on joint structure. and the fact ery few dwarf breed actual have a problem long term with joint issues.


see BHCA on health, testing Health Policy
 
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