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A puppy should be socialized for the situations of being with people and other dogs ,if that part is covered then most any situation is covered
that is far from the case. common fears of noise, vaccuum and even brooms are common and that is the result of inadequite habituation to daily life. That is very different in a rule vs urban setting. A rural dog it unlike going have to deal with the noise level of an urban setting sirens and the like whereas a urban dogs is unlikely to confront the smell, noises and appearance of wildlife. just a couple of the very real difference that occur.

Puppy Socialisation and Habituation (Part 2) How to go about it
Things to do away from home
Go to all the environments you can think of that will help your puppy become "bomb proof" . Start in quieter places and gradually find busier ones.
The street: Expose your puppy to the sound of traffic and the movement of people. Start in quiet side streets and gradually build up to busy ones.
Places where people congregate: Any environment where people tend to congregate to sit and chat will do, so that they have the time to take interest in and handle your puppy.
Children's play areas: This is obviously a good place to meet lots of children (but consult your veterinary surgeon about the appropriate worming programme before bringing your puppy in contact with children). Children should not talk to strangers, so make arrangements with their mothers. Start with just a few children and control their enthusiasm to prevent your puppy from being overwhelmed, which can easily happen.
The car: Plenty of car travel will accustom your puppy to it and help prevent car sickness. Do not let your puppy sit on the front seat or on someone's lap. Accustom it to travelling in the place it will occupy when it is an adult.
The countryside: Accustom your puppy to the sights, sounds and smells of the countryside and livestock etc. (in your enthusiasm don't forget the Country Code).
 

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I understand exactly what you are saying and it is one more reason sending out a six week old puppy is way too young.The breeder should be helping the puppies experience most of those things right in her home,around her area,through family members,it is all part of the work we put into litters before they go to new homes. After that it is up to the new homes to wiork with the puppies hopefully under the guidence of the breeder. It should be that smooth of a transition.
 

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.The breeder should be helping the puppies experience most of those things right in her home,around her area,through family members,
Whose job it is is highly debateable what is most important is not who does it but that it gets done. I compelte undertand a breeder reluctance to give up a puppie at six weeks because they loose control of this important process. and if you are going to assume a lifetime commitment to the dog that is a vey big risk or liabilty the breeder is assuming leting some one else do the bulk of the socialization . I get all that I understand the though process that say some giving the dog up earlier are shirking a big responsibilty that a breeder assumes, That does not mean however six, seven eight or any other length of time is too soo or too late,. It depend entirely on the situation they are leaving vs the one they are going to. I am not advocating that breeder should release the dog earlier the solization that a responsible breed does is very much a value added servace The problem I have is blanket statement that to not take in effect extenuating circumstances.

Say fior instance the breeder needs to be hospitized for several weeks witha a sudden and acute infection, when the puppies are 6-7 week old. Is is better th hold on to the puppies and have a less savy friend look after them as best as they can. Or is better to let the dog go early at least to the home that the new owner is known to be puupy savey what is more appropriat cause of action? I trulely blanket bklack and white line is an injustice to the actual complexity of the issue.
 

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I have a question, why does my Pit Bull Richter when he finds a certain material suck on it and knead it like his mother? He has done this twice that I have seen once with this pillow I had in the car and just the other day with a blanket that was real soft. He just laid down and sucked and kneaded. I tell my husband it is because he got taken away from his mother to soon but I really have know idea why.

Here are some pics of the pillow.
 

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There are always extenuating circumstances to be considered and for myself it has never been a matter of losing control of anything it has always just been a matter of the right thing to do. For me is also of no matter, that I'm committing to the puppies whole life,I do it so hopefully my puppies will stay in their new homes forever,barring any unforseen circumstances. Plenty of things have happened,breeders have been killed during the course of raising a litter and in those cases there is no choice but to let the puppies go. Will it compromise the puppies learning abilities and/behaviour ,most surely,in what ways, how many, who knows.
 

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For the dog who sucks things ,I had a Doberman once who did the very same thing.When we took her home she had a piece of material that had been with the mom and pups and had their smell on it ,to make her transition to our home easier. She started sucking on that I just thought it was cute.When she was older we put a blanket down on our bedroom floor for her and she started sucking that.I think it is a pleasent memory sensation,they go back to the feeling safe with the mom and babies.I know of nothing to substanciate this but it is what I think.
 

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Thanks bubbad I kind of thought that also it must trigger some sort of memory to him, it is cute I just let him do it. I have just thought maybe it was from being taken away to soon but I guess you never know. I'm sure he didn't come from the best breeder as the original owner was a young man that was a first time dog owner and who would sell a Pit Bull to a first time dog owner. So I figure he was sold when he was 6 weeks but I will never know.
 

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Phew! Hot topic!

My 2 cents is that I got Olive when when she was 6 weeks old (the rest left mama at 8 weeks though) and she turned out just fine. We already had a 4 year old Golden at home who made a wonderful big sister and role model. Two cats, too. They put her in her place early on. There was aaaaalways someone at home to take care of her, so she got used to lots of people handling her and caring for her. I also started making "play dates" for her with other dogs of all shapes and sizes, took her out in public often to meet new people (the vet clinic is a playground of new friends in her eyes to this very day) and taught her to be confident about new people & animals. Now, she loves everybody, she's an angel with children of all ages, she's uncannily good at meeting new dogs and knows just how to act to make the other dog feel as comfortable with her as possible (from a full-grown Newfie to an 8 week old Pomeranian).

Maybe it doesn't matter if it's 6, 8, or 10 weeks old if the person taking the puppy home is responsible and knows to continue socialization throughout the dog's life.

The problem is, not everyone is going to be responsible. So I can see where some breeders would prefer to have control of the situation as long as they can without taking the joy of having a "cute little puppy" away from customers.
 

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He has done this twice that I have seen once with this pillow I had in the car and just the other day with a blanket that was real soft. He just laid down and sucked and kneaded..

Olive sucks in her sleep. Someone else said it could be because it's a pleasant sensation/memory for them. That could be it. I'm assuming that's why mine does it, since she's not even conscious.
 

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Just found this thread - he is a mahogany and this gene is liked to the tricolour. It's found in American Bassets, and in Australian Bassets, probably from the same route as the Americans - and there is some evidence that this originally from Russia. We have a breeder here in the UK who imported a bitch from Australia and started getting what he calls 'mahagany tricolours'. Which I've had heated discussions over!! He gets litters with some that are straight tricolours, some lemon/white and some this mahogany colour. There is evidence to suggest this colour IS linked to tricolours, but I'd not call them mahogany tris. Just mahogany. And as adults, they will be a reddish-brown colour, with white.

Unlike the true lemon/white, which start off very white and darken, these mahogany, as with tricolours who start off dark, often just black and white until the tan comes in, lighten as they mature.

ps For the record, none of my puppies went home younger than 8 weeks and then only to people I knew or those experienced with the breed. Most of mine stayed with me until 10 weeks and none suffered with any kind of emotional problems (fear period) as a result of not going home at under 8 weeks. I do believe that Bassets are sensitive animals, and do better not to be sent into the world until they are older than some might prefer to get them out. I'd also suggest that the temptation for any new owner to get their puppy out into everywhere before the full course of vaccination is done, is very high. If mine went home at 10 weeks, they went to the vet for their first shots at least, within the first 48 hours which is something that can't be done at 6 weeks because for most puppies, natural immunity hasn't dropped off enough for it to take at much younger than 8 weeks, minimum.
 

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With our two went looking for Bassets from reputable breeders (or so I naively thought at the time) but if anyone one had offered us a pup under 8 weeks, would have walked away. Can split hairs with if this, if that, (unless God intervenes) no good breeder who is breeding for health, character & to better their line would consider letting pups go under 8 weeks & the longer I know the breed can understand why some keep them for longer. Socialisation is very important but so is the socialisation a pup gains from it's mother & litter mates. A good breeder will not only begin socialisation with pups before they leave, some will even start house training. I've been shot down for saying this before but in going to a new home so young so vaccinations can be given too early, which can cause to them be ineffective. Yes of course pup needs to get out & about a soon as possible, but hey whats wrong with carrying them, sports bag over the shoulder our youngest loved it. What's the hurry all the time, we've all made mistakes & misjudgements but learn from them.
 

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What's the hurry all the time,
Because there is a limited time to accomplish socialization when the dog is open to new experiences the top end of which is 20 week


no good breeder who is breeding for health, character & to better their line would consider letting pups go under 8 weeks
very untrue see
Puppy Socialisation and Habituation (Part 1) Why is it Necessary?

What practical applications do we have that bear out the research? Guide Dogs for the Blind, who, until 1956, used to rely on the donation of adult dogs which they took on approval to maintain their training stock. The success rate of these dogs fluctuated between 9 and 11 percent and it was recognised that this could be improved if the association could supervise the rearing of puppies. These were purchased and placed in private homes at between ten and twelve weeks old or even later. Things improved, but the results were not good enough. It was Derek Freeman, who pushed to have puppies placed in private homes at an earlier age to optimise socialisation and habituation during the critical development period. Derek had a strong belief in Scott and Fuller’s work and importance of early socialisation and habituation in the production of dogs that were best able to survive and perform in the world at large.
Derek found that six weeks was the best time to place puppies in private homes; any later critically reduced the time left before the puppies reached twelve weeks; but if puppies were removed from their dam and litter mates before six weeks they missed the opportunity to be properly socialised with their own kind, which resulted in inept interactions with other dogs in later life
It is a matter of who is better capable of hadling the socialization and Habitiuation, Most of the time it is the breeder however that is not always the case.
 

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Everyone can have a view but through experience (limited compared to many of this forum perhaps), listening & talking to good breeders who from their care, treatment & responsibility to their pups, still believe it is wrong to remove/sell a pup (Basset) before it is 8 weeks. It's all to easy to quote chunks of literature from publications to support your views but personally prefer to research, read & listen to those whose years of experiences & knowledge I trust.

Of course socialisation is very important especially so during the few months, it should be fun, rewarding, simulating, not forced and continue along with training throughout the years. But it's not only with other dogs, you make it sound as if 20 weeks is some cut off point.
 

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Personally,despite whatever the links say about letting puppies go I am the breeder and I decide at what age my puppies will be fit for leaving the mom,sibilings,and my self,guided by how mature puppies are in age and 6 weeks is too early.The older puppies are( 8-12 weeks)the better they handle the stress of leaving the litter and me.It is easier for them to aclimate to their new familes and situations at those ages.I've raised enough litters of puppies to have proved this much to myself and some others. Most people placing puppies at six week do not care how they adjust to their new homes only that their food bill goes down and they don't need to pay for more vaccinations. This is also a pet peeve of mine.I will not trust a new owner who will probably undo everything I've accomplished with the puppy up to that age,so when they are ready I will send them.

what about getting a pup at 14
Weeks ? We had huge issues with submissive peeing breeder said they were never outside or by people
 
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