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I have never owned a basset before. I have picked one out to buy though and I am soooo excited about it. He was born last Saturday and this is a picture of him. I was wondering what color he is going to be? I have never seen a basset this color. I am guessing it's just puppy fur and will change with time?
 

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His color will change as he grows so right now is not a good indication of what he will be in 8 weeks ,my guess is brown and white.Please don't let them palm him off on you at 6 weeks of age no puppy is ready to be seperated that young from the mom and siblings.Yes they are weaned,but still too young ,8 weeks at the least, and mine stay till about 10 weeks.
 

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My breeder friend keeps pups until they are10 weeks of age and they get lots of sibling play time. Six weeks is far too young to be leaving the family! Their markings change quite a bit from birth until three months.
 

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I'd say he's a mahogany.
 

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yep

. Six weeks is far too young to be leaving the family
a studies on socialization of dogs do not support six weeks is to soon Puppy Socialisation and Habituation (Part 1) Why is it Necessary?
Guide Dogs for the Blind, who, until 1956, used to rely on the donation of adult dogs which they took on approval to maintain their training stock. The success rate of these dogs fluctuated between 9 and 11 percent and it was recognised that this could be improved if the association could supervise the rearing of puppies. These were purchased and placed in private homes at between ten and twelve weeks old or even later. Things improved, but the results were not good enough. It was Derek Freeman, who pushed to have puppies placed in private homes at an earlier age to optimise socialisation and habituation during the critical development period. Derek had a strong belief in Scott and Fuller’s work and importance of early socialisation and habituation in the production of dogs that were best able to survive and perform in the world at large.
Derek found that six weeks was the best time to place puppies in private homes; any later critically reduced the time left before the puppies reached twelve weeks; but if puppies were removed from their dam and litter mates before six weeks they missed the opportunity to be properly socialised with their own kind, which resulted in inept interactions with other dogs in later life. The training success rate soared because of this policy, which was carried out in conjunction with the management of the gene pool via the breeding scheme Derek also pioneered. Annual success rates in excess of 75 percent became common
keep in mind Guide Dogs for the Blind have a strict socilization and habituation protocal and given the work that they do would prefer a dog biased toward human contact even at the expense of lossing some dog v dog skills.

Most reputible breeder will not sell a dog this young because if the socialization and habituation that the breeder does is not continued by the new owner severe developmental behavior issue can result. So it is generally in their best interest to keep a pup longer. not necessisarily in the pups or the new dogs owners best interest. It all depends on the skill, and ability and wherewithall of the new owner to continue with socialization and hibituation of the dog.

If you have not guesses that when the optimal time for a puppy to leave the litter is a pet peeve of mine and IMHO it is highly dependant on a lot of factors not the least of which is who is best able to carrier out the socialization the puppy needs. The breeder or new owner.
 

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Personally,despite whatever the links say about letting puppies go I am the breeder and I decide at what age my puppies will be fit for leaving the mom,sibilings,and my self,guided by how mature puppies are in age and 6 weeks is too early.The older puppies are( 8-12 weeks)the better they handle the stress of leaving the litter and me.It is easier for them to aclimate to their new familes and situations at those ages.I've raised enough litters of puppies to have proved this much to myself and some others. Most people placing puppies at six week do not care how they adjust to their new homes only that their food bill goes down and they don't need to pay for more vaccinations. This is also a pet peeve of mine.I will not trust a new owner who will probably undo everything I've accomplished with the puppy up to that age,so when they are ready I will send them.
 

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Most people placing puppies at six week do not care how they adjust to their new homes only that their food bill goes down and they don't need to pay for more vaccinations
that being the case it is better they leave sooner rather than latter because they are not going to get the appropriate socialization.

a pet peeve of mine is by the assumption that leaving a puppy with its litttermate it is somehow magical being socialized.
 

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that being the case it is better they leave sooner rather than latter because they are not going to get the appropriate socialization.

a pet peeve of mine is by the assumption that leaving a puppy with its litttermate it is somehow magical being socialized.
Better yet, go elsewhere and get a puppy from a breeder that puts in the time, work and expense to raise them properly.
 

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I've always felt that it's better for them to stay with the breeder until at least 10 weeks, assuming that it's a good breeder who knows what they are doing. I've had younger ones and I see a huge difference in getting them at the later age.
 

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Yep I'm goin with bubbad and Soundtrack they need to be with mom longer and I have had them earlier also but not now, 8 weeks at the earliest.
 

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It is certainly more socialized than pulling it away at 6 weeks.A good breeder has the socialization under control geared for the age of the puppy and they get dog socialization by staying with the litter longer.

a pet peeve of mine is by the assumption that leaving a puppy with its litttermate it is somehow magical being socialized.[/QUOTE]
 

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My Libby has fear issues most likely because she was not properly socialized as a puppy. She is now 3.5 and she has made a lot of progress, but still struggles with meeting new people. I agree with bubbad and soundtrack. Puppies are better off being with their mom and littermates longer. I wish my Libby had been well socialized as a puppy. It's tough to see her struggle with meeting new people, other dogs and learning how to play with a toy.
 

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It is certainly more socialized than pulling it away at 6 weeks
not necessarily you can easily end up with a dog like Mariah great with other dogs not so much with humans. The earlier the dog leaves the litter all things being equa,l which they never are, the better with humans and the worse with other dogs it will be. In something like a service dog having it relate more strongly to humans and less so with other dogs is probably an asset not so much in a pack hunting situation. There is no magic number It is all about the socialization the dog receives and how is better campable of providing it.

If I were a breeder I would tend to want to keep the dogs longer because if you are going to make a commitment for the life of the puppy then you do not want someone else screwing the dog up because they did not adequitly socialize it. It is a CYA position I understand that but it is not always the best /ideal for every situation and circumstance. blanket statement like such and such is too early are in the end meaningless and without merit.
 

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Better yet, go elsewhere and get a puppy from a breeder that puts in the time, work and expense to raise them properly.
the socialization a pupy need and what is proper is highly dependant on the situation they are moving to. Does a dog that is headed to a rural setting need to be socialized to an urban one? So what is adequite and prober for one situation is not for another. it is impossible to socialize for every situation however it is not impossible to give the dog agood base to work from
 

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A puppy should be socialized for the situations of being with people and other dogs ,if that part is covered then most any situation is covered.Urban or rural has nothing to do with it.Six weeks is too young for any puppy of any breed to be taken away from the mom and siblings,that is a blanket statement if I ever made one and it is proven by the people who have received puppies of this age and then gone on to have behaviour and fear problems,more so, in my experience, than puppies who leave later.What exact number of people that is no one knows but I can tell you from working for Vets long ago that it was true then and I can't believe it has changed that much.
 
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