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Humphrey who is 11 years old was fine in the morning went outside and when he came in he was dragging his right leg. The vet. took xrays and could'nt find anything. Humphrey eats drinks and does his business outside the only thing is he is not useing his back legs at all. Except to scratch and he'll use his left hind leg and trys so hard to use that hind right leg.
Hope someone can help.
Thank you:(
 

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http://www.dogsymptomscure.com/dog-stroke-symptoms.php]Dog Stroke[/url]

Loss of hind limb use in bassets is generally associated with IVD Unless a dye was used during an xray it is unlikely to show up.

PARAPARESIS AND PARAPLEGIA
On the other hand, chondrodystrophic breeds of dogs are prone to the development of IVD herniation early in life. In these breeds (including dachshunds, beagles, pekinese, miniature poodles, cocker spaniels, pomeranians and basset hounds), there is a metaplasia of the nucleus pulposus whereby the normal collagen fibers of the nucleus are replaced by hyaline fibers. The hyaline fibers are less elastic than collagen fibers leading to degeneration of the annulus fibrosis. The hyaline fibers during this degenerative process calcify, creating further inelasticity. Due to the fact that the annulus fibrosis is thinnest dorsally toward the spinal cord, the least line of resistance for the degeneration and breakdown of the annulus is toward the spinal cord. Ultimately, the annulus ruptures allowing the herniation of the degenerative nucleus into the neural canal, compressing the spinal cord. Not only does the IVD material compress the spinal cord, but the degenerative material is irritative in nature. The presence of the herniated material in the epidural space causes inflammation, furthering the swelling associated with the herniation.
Almost all chondrodystrophic dogs will show some degree of IVD degeneration within a year of age. The earliest I have seen clinical IVD herniation is these dogs is at 7 months. Usually the onset is between 2-3 years of age with the peak incidence being between 4-6 years of age

...Medical management of IVD disease consists of absolute rest for a minimum of 30 days or 3 weeks beyond return to clinical normalcy. This confinement must be in a cage no more than 2.5 x 1.5 times the animal's body length. An airline carrier is ideal. Many patients will benefit from corticosteroid management during the initiation of treatment. I think this should only be done under direct veterinary supervision. If the patient feels better and then becomes active before healing has occurred, they are at great risk to get worse. We see this outcome commonly. It could be prevented in many cases, with absolute confinement of the patient.
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Disk Disease


If only one leg is involved there are a lot more potential causes especial soft tissue injuries to a muscle, tendon or ligament.
 

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Disk injury is the first thing that comes to mind, and honestly if it's NOT the first thing that occurs to a vet presented with a Basset who can't use his hind legs I would be looking for another vet.

Did the vet recommend any treatment at all? At the very least I would suggest crate rest and possibly anti-inflammatories.

Seriously, get a second opinion from a vet that will do more than just take an x-ray and say "I dunno".
 

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Until you find out what is wrong, I would make him stay in a crate except to go to the bathroom. The vet didn't give you any anti-inflammatories or pain killers? I second the suggestion to find another vet. And to what extent is he not using his legs? Can he put weight on them? If you turn his hind paws backward (one at a time) when he's standing does he flip it back to its normal position? Does he act like his leg hurts? Has he had ticks this summer? We need lots more information.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
The vet did give Humphrey anti-inflammatory meds. I would think if it was a disk or spine injury that he would be in pain which he is not. He uses the left scratch and at times he ties to use the right,he can move it slightly. When goes potty no.2 I hold his back up so he's somewhat standing. In fact tonight we caught hin actually standing on all his legs toturn around but then nothig. I've been massaging his legs.
The vet said he could'nt figure what was happening from the xrays. No ticks he has been on reveloution since he has been in our family which has been over 9 years.
No he acts normal no pain. Just is so strange no pain.
 

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No he acts normal no pain. Just is so strange no pain.
it depends on how and which nerves are pinched the lack of deep pain sensing is a sign of severe nerve damage at the spine actually.
 

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I've had three dogs with disc injury. One was paralyzed, had surgery and recovered, was paralyzed again and recovered with medication and physiotherapy. She never had any sign of pain.
One had a minor injury with unsteadiness and difficulty using her back legs, recovered with treatment, no sign of pain.
The third was also paralyzed, but in such excruciating pain that we put her down right away. The vet said she was not a candidate for surgery.

I still would recommend a second opinion. And the crate rest-the anti-inflammatories will make the dog feel better and possibly be more active than they should be, increasing the risk of making thje injury worse.
 

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I still would recommend a second opinion. And the crate rest-the anti-inflammatories will make the dog feel better and possibly be more active than they should be, increasing the risk of making thje injury worse.
a minimum of 3 weeks.
 
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