Basset Hounds Forum banner

1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
633 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Since weaning barney off of the chicken and rice an onto a kibble I am struggling to get him to eat enough he needs to gain some weight. Is is ok to put some wet food ith it. He is on Merrick right now and I know they have some canned food. Some people say the wet is bad for the teeth but if I add a little to make the food more interesting is that a big deal?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,338 Posts
I did it for a while when Molly was small. She is a picky eater (or was...). I weaned her off of it so she wouldn't gain too much weight as she got older. She's completely off it now. It was a matter of finding food she liked.

I think a little wet food is ok. If you are worried about teeth, give him a decent chew bone and/or brush his teeth :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,943 Posts
Since weaning barney off of the chicken and rice an onto a kibble I am struggling to get him to eat enough he needs to gain some weight

that is exceedingly rare the case. Wet food on a volume basis is less calorical dense so if it is a physical issue of geting enough food in the dog it will not help/ What happens is dog can quickly develop a preferrence which is fine if that preference is what you want if not then it is general a bad idea to cater to the dog because what the dog learns is to be a picky eater by holding out it can manipulate you into fed something different and diferent general = better.

With puppies feed no more than they will eat in 10 minutes and pick-up the bowl do not get overly concerned if they leave some etc thier needs chage as they grow and not on a stright line basis. growth is not regual or stead so there eating pattern ar not as well.

It is far healther for a puppy to be skinny in fact for a large preed puppy it realy needs to be skinny compared to adult it grow up with the least chance of incurring an orthopeadic issue related to too fast a growth, Overfeeding is the number one cause of developmental orthopeadic abnormalities in large and giant breed dogs see

Dog Diet Do's and Don’t's
Feed whatever amount is necessary to maintain a BCS of two during the growth period, realizing that dogs have varying growth rates and activity levels. Once his adult stature is achieved, you may allow him to reach a score of three.
Optimal feeding of large breed puppies

act the skeletal development of puppies, the diet is one factor that every owner can control. Several orthopedic diseases of dogs can be precipitated by improper feeding practices during growth. Large breeds of dogs are predisposed to these problems because they have the genetic potential for excessively rapid growth. In rapidly growing, large breed puppies, maximal growth, and therefore increased body weight, can cause stress on the immature developing skeleton. Large breed dogs have decreased bone density compared to smaller breed dogs at this stage (Dammrich, 1991). Additionally, fast bone growth results in structural defects of bones that are in turn unable to accommodate an increased body weight (Dammrich, 1991).

..
It is necessary to feed the puppy enough to allow for controlled growth, but it is equally important to avoid overfeeding. Many people believe that a round puppy is a happy healthy puppy. However, maximal growth is​
not optimal growth. Adult size is principally influenced by genetics; however, the time
to reach adult size can and should be controlled by proper nutrition. Excess calories can predispose large breed puppies to developmental bone disease, including hypertrophic osteodystrophy (Dammrich, 1991).

While any food has the potential to cause problems with skeletal development if overfed or supplemented, maximal growth in puppies is commonly occurs with feeding a highly palatable, high energy density growth diet. These types of diets are often overeaten if fed on a free choice basis, or simply too much is fed on a meal basis. There is currently no perfect formula to guarantee an optimal rate of growth for an individual puppy. It is especially important to avoid overnutrition during periods of the most rapid growth, which will vary with breed and between individuals

...
One very general suggestion is to provide an amount of food that the puppy can eat in 10 minutes three times a day. Using this as a starting point when the puppy is weaned at seven to nine weeks old, it is recommended to continually assess the puppy’s body condition and activity level and adjust the amount of food being offered accordingly


Let the puppy grow at its own pace do not try and force the issue.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,943 Posts
as for the specific question their is nothing inheirently better or worse about caned vs moist vs dry food other than the fact the dryier food tend to be more calorical dense because of lower warer content so a a caloric basis it cost less to feed.

Issues about teeth etc should can can be handle by brushing and just because you feed dry does not less the need for doing so.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
697 Posts
Hen had wet and dried food together. When he was small he wouldnt eat all but the tinyest bit of food and at 16 weeks weighed 16lb and was pronounced thin by the vets. After finding a food his tummy could tolerate the vet recommend we mix it with a little chicken and that is what we still do today. He is now 46lb and nice and sleek. The sad thing is that the only foods he can eat without getting a poorly tummy are purina and some horrible red fake meat looking type pellets - Ole Roy!!!! He has a mix of that morning and night with his chicken and is doing great. I wish he would eat a good quality kibble, we tried him on everything you can think of but as soon as he had more than a teaspoon full mixed in he would get an upset tummy. So now we stick with what we know and everyone is happy, but mainly Henry!
Long story short, alot of places do trial sized samples of food. Try them until you can find what puppy likes and can tolerate
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
633 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Barney is only 18 pounds at 15 weeks. You can clearly see the outline of his entire rib cage. I know rolly polly is not good but the fact that every rib is very defined is what is causing the concern with his weight. I was thinking if I mixed the two together he would find it more interesting. He was on the chicken and rice only because of how bad his diarrhea has been because of the giardia. I don't mind always giving the combination it is just when we go out people comment on how thin he is. Is it normal to see a basset's whole rib cage when they are young. I have not seen any other basset puppies before? e has plenty of energy and has a beautiful shiny coat I just had thought that seeing the rib cage whilt they are standing was not good.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
633 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
maybe just the last three ribs but you can see the outline he has nice muscular legs. I am probably just being overly worried have always had small dogs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
697 Posts
I think you are worrying, Hen was called skinny even last week as he isnt fat - we tell people he is a racing basset! If you are seriously worried next time you are at the vet ask them to condition score him and then you have some thing fixed in your mind. I do agree with Mikey though, let him develop at his own speed, find a food he enjoys and youl find soon he will grow into a beautiful big boy!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,943 Posts
You can clearly see the outline of his entire rib cage
as you should now if every vib were clearly decernible with large depression between both then yes under weight but being able to see the ribs what you want. Puppies at that age have rather thin coats so givent the same amount of fat covering the ribs there are more vissiable compared to an adult. If you had a Aussie and could se the ribs that is a different matter becasue of the coat difference. A short hard coat makes seeing the rib esier. Visual of the rib is a poor indicator of weight veause of this you need to put your hands on the dog. That said even the ribs are a rathe ppor indicator and by the time there is a fat layer on the ribs the dog is quite over weight It alwa dangeriou to make interspecies comarisions and generalization however I am certainly over weight and with my shirt off you can see every rib clearly defined,

for more of graphic of how the pribs should feel take you left hand and make a fist. Rub the back of your hand. Notice you can feel but it is a bit difficult every rib with a layer of fat and skin over the top. If this is what your dogs rib feel like it is over weight. Now rub you hand over the knuckles notice only a slight layer of skin and no dercernable fat with fairly deep depression beween each rib this is too thin. With you hand still in a fist rub at your fingers between the knuckle. bone easily felt with maybe a slight layer of fat and a slight depression between each bone.


from diet do's and don't link above defining a two

Ribs easily palpated and may be visible with no palpable fat. Tops of lumbar vertebrae visible. Pelvic bones less prominent. Obvious waist and abdominal tuck.
I thing the verterbre and hips are better indicators of body condition than the ribs because of the limitation I mentioned before

see corpulent canine
  1. <LI type=a>To check the neck, press your thumb and index finger deep into the side of the neck just ahead of the shoulder, and pinch them together. If your fingers are more than 1/2" apart, the dog is overweight. (Note: this is where old dogs tend to carry most of their excess fat, and they may actually be thin in other locations.) <LI type=a>To check the ribs, stand with your dog beside you, facing his butt. Place your thumb on the middle of his spine half way down the back and spread your fingers out over his last few ribs. Then run your fingers up and down along his skin. You should be able to feel the bumps of his ribs without pressing in.
  2. To check the hips, run your hand over your dog's croup. You should be able to feel the bumps of his two pelvic bones without pressing down.

Mariah a 4 on the purina BCS scale of 1-9 4-5 equals ideal


Macey is about a 5
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
633 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Thanks for the pics that eases my mind. I met someone today who has had 5 bassets he said Barney looks perfect not thin. I am not going to worry anymore he is such a wonderful dog and friend I just want to make sure he will ne happy and healthy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,943 Posts
the body image most carry of a basset is actual a very overweight to obese dog and they reay should be atheletic dogs. that of a linebacker or a line men not a sprite like a typical wide reciever.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,780 Posts
Plus Barney has been sick for sometime, so it will take a couple weeks to get his nutrition back. Worm had lots of issues as a pup-- i can show u a super skinny pic later.

i did probably feed him a little more as he was on the upward climb of recovery, since he would lose some weight whenever he had worms, diarrhea, pneumonia...

he eats Merrick dry food, and I also give him 2 spoons of Merrick wet food these days, per meal. it's fun, they have 10 or so different flavors, like Thansgiving Day & Wingaling (chicken wing in there...).

and as Mikey said, regardless, we are brushing his teeth couple times/week
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
633 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
Plus I am from massachusetts so people tend to just spew things like he is so skinny really loud and make you feel embarassed like you are not feeding them. I see overweight dogs everywhere I go. I was thinking about a raw diet, ^^ I was talking to a girl yesterday and she said how someone she worked with opened a can of wing a lings and ate it right from the can so I am sure the dogs must love it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,780 Posts
oh yeah, Barney, i hear that all the time, people asking me how much I feed him & giving me suggestions on how to fatten him up. People expect to see a bigger basset hound, that's for sure.

Worm's Ma was only in the low 30's, so he already weighs more than her. tho he's supposed to be pure basset from an AKC litter, i would swear that somewhere in the lineage, a wiener dog came up and mated w/one of Worm's ancestors....

He was rated 3.5 out of 9 on one of the scales (not sure if the same as Mikey uses?), and that specialist wanted him to be more like 4. On the other hand, his primary vet & the head vet who runs the animal hospital thought he was just right & that I should not have him gain weight.

Also having firsthand experience w/a wiener dog who was even skinnier than Worm is now, who became overweight by 3-5 yrs of age. These hounds all struggle with the same problem. Plus more propensity to gain weight post-neutering, which both dogs are.

OK-- here's the super skinny Worm picture. Don't think i was on this forum when he was like this (haha, too busy taking care of all his issues...). it was around the time of one of his illnesses, somewhere between 4-5 months old... what makes him look worse is that he has a... having trouble finding the word... abnormality? birth defect?... anyway, flanged ribs, so the bottom of his rib cage sticks out more than usual...

his ribs are pretty prominent in the sunlight.
omg-- Wingalings! Worm's gonna start a separate thread on that...
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,943 Posts
He was rated 3.5 out of 9 on one of the scales (not sure if the same as Mikey uses?), and that specialist wanted him to be more like 4. On the other hand, his primary vet & the head vet who runs the animal hospital thought he was just right & that I should not have him gain weight.

He was rated 3.5 out of 9 on one of the scales (not sure if the same as Mikey uses?), and that specialist wanted him to be more like 4. On the other hand, his primary vet & the head vet who runs the animal hospital thought he was just right & that I should not have him gain weight.
more than likely here is the ling but keep in mind it is intended for adult dogs not puppies
Body condition chart

another thing to keep in mind when chart first came out 5 was ideal and four levels each side of it so nine steps in the last ten year or so the Ideal range has ben move toward the thiner isdfe as more evidence comes about on longeviety and health of dogs vs body condition, So what was Ideal as little as ten years ago has shifted,
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,943 Posts
abnormality? birth defect?...
umm when the majority of basset have some degree of this it is hard to call it an adnormality because it is well the norm I tend to go with not conformational correct when dealing with thing like this. ie feet that point east-west not north- south, fiddle front etc.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
972 Posts
i have to admit, i thought worm was skinny when i saw some pics =P but i totally get it. I actually try to keep some weight on bowser, because i know it's okay to see the definition of the ribs a little, but i just can't stand it. as long as when you see him you see the ribcage deeper and the belly go up smaller, I'm happy. Now as for our beagle...she spent 3 weeks with my parents, and got...FAT. ROUND is more like it. She also gained muscle, because her and bowser ran on half an acre ALL day long, but she was ridiculous *lol*
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Top