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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Dixie, my 9 year old Basset mix went to vet yesterday and she had gained 20 lbs. in about a month. Is this even possible? I do not even think I could gain 20 in a month! She definitely looks larger. No change in food, slightly less physical activity for her and me. She loves treats and chew things. She is at the beginning of kidney failure ( she drinks a lot but does not pee that much) and her back legs are hurting. I understand the weight gain but 20 pounds in such a short period of time? I understand it is causing pain in legs. Thoughts? I feel like a horrible Mom! Any fat free treats I can make? I am preparing myself for weeks of non-stop moaning for treats!
 

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I use dried fish as treats for mine (UK) but you could try baking liver - avoid pigs liver - which might help. Raw carrot is good but it's not really digested and you may well see it 'coming through'.

Water retention could be what's showing as weight gain? If she has pain in her back legs, that can be helped with medication as prescribed by your vet. And feed her less - dogs don't need quite as much during the summer months because of less activity when it's hot so maybe cutting back might help?
 

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I had no idea how much she had gained! I was feeding her as usual! I am not looking forward to the moaning in front of the refrigerator when she wants something!
 

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dog run better on fat much better to cut carbs not fat out of the diet. Dogs requirement for carbs. is zero.





Before switching to a high protien diet You need to consult with vet on where your dogs Kidney Disease progression is. At late stage disease high protein diets are undesireable but up to that point high protein diets may be benifitial
"The only exception was found in dogs fed a reduced-protein diet, which failed to appropriately adjust renal tubular excretion of sodium and phosphate. The only advantage of reduced dietary protein in this study was a reduction in blood urea nitrogen (BUN). Disadvantages of reduced-protein diets were reduced glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and renal plasma flow. "

 
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