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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
These laws affect kennels selling 60 or more dogs per year:

• Requirement that dogs have access to outdoor exercise areas, unless granted an exception for inside exercise
• Increased minimum floor space for kennels
• Only veterinarians can euthanize dogs at commercial breeding kennels
• Requirement of veterinary examinations of all dogs in commercial kennels every 6 months
• Establishment of a Canine Health Board, comprised of all small animal veterinarians, which will set guidelines on temperature, ventilation, lighting, and more.

The bill makes many positive changes including: banning the use of wire flooring, increasing the size of dog cages, and eliminating cage stacking.


Governor Rendell and the Department of Agriculture have made sweeping changes to the Dog Law Bureau. These changes have increased inspections and prosecutions for violations of the existing dog kennel laws. Additionally, the Dog Law Bureau has improved the public disclosure of dog law violations. The results of all dog law kennel inspections are posted on http://services.agriculture.state.pa.us/Ke...nspections.aspx
 

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These laws affect kennels selling 60 or more dogs per year:

• Requirement that dogs have access to outdoor exercise areas, unless granted an exception for inside exercise
• Increased minimum floor space for kennels
• Only veterinarians can euthanize dogs at commercial breeding kennels
• Requirement of veterinary examinations of all dogs in commercial kennels every 6 months
• Establishment of a Canine Health Board, comprised of all small animal veterinarians, which will set guidelines on temperature, ventilation, lighting, and more.

The bill makes many positive changes including: banning the use of wire flooring, increasing the size of dog cages, and eliminating cage stacking.
Governor Rendell and the Department of Agriculture have made sweeping changes to the Dog Law Bureau. These changes have increased inspections and prosecutions for violations of the existing dog kennel laws. Additionally, the Dog Law Bureau has improved the public disclosure of dog law violations. The results of all dog law kennel inspections are posted on http://services.agriculture.state.pa.us/Ke...nspections.aspx[/b]
 

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I am so proud of PA for getting this bill passed. I truly hope that people working on laws in other states will use them as an example of how things can change.

I spent last weekend at a puppy mill auction in MO and it is so evident that things need to change and change quickly. No living creature should be subject to what commercial kennels and miller do to these animals.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
OH GOODIE--- one more law that won't be enforced !!!!!!![/b]
Hi Dean-

I have a proposition for you: since you and I are both residents of Pa. but on the opposite sides of this issue, why don't we both follow what happens over the next year, and then both post on the forum next October so folks can see how it turns out-

Maybe I'll see you between now and then out at the E-town Beagle Club at a fun run- ( I promise to take my United Against Puppy Mills bumber sticker off my car if I come out! ;) )

Mary
 

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I am very much against puppymills !!!!!!!!!! -----none of the current efforts to control them have been adequately written, and if history is exmined, the new laws won't be enforced either. They still have not defined a puppymill and a backyard breeder, or a hunter. All of the "reputable" breeders have forgotten that they started as backyard breeders.
Almost every article on puppymills states that the operator had been operating outside the law for years and had been cited many times for violations ----- do you really believe more laws on the books will make a difference ????? There is a good chance the new laws will be enforced selectively on hunters and even pet owners who have anti-dog neighbors
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I am very much against puppymills !!!!!!!!!! -----none of the current efforts to control them have been adequately written, and if history is exmined, the new laws won't be enforced either. They still have not defined a puppymill and a backyard breeder, or a hunter. All of the "reputable" breeders have forgotten that they started as backyard breeders.
Almost every article on puppymills states that the operator had been operating outside the law for years and had been cited many times for violations ----- do you really believe more laws on the books will make a difference ????? There is a good chance the new laws will be enforced selectively on hunters and even pet owners who have anti-dog neighbors[/b]
Hi Dean-

I've lived in Pa. for almost 30 years, and as you know, owned acerage that bordered the E-town Beagle Club- lots of my friends hunt, so in that sense I'm sorry to find myself on the opposite side of the issue.

I've heard the points you've made from sporting groups , but I still support the legislation. I think the legislation will accomplish what was intended, and that sporting groups and small breeders won't suffer.

I'll post again next October and let readers know how it's going a year out.

I'd love for you to post next October too, so that folks can see how someone from the sporting side sees it after the laws have been in effect for a year.

Mary
 

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I'd love for you to post next October too, so that folks can see how someone from the sporting side sees it after the laws have been in effect for a year.

Mary[/b]

Sorry to say Mary you don't have much of a chance because the commercial kennel are given up to three years to comply and the standard do not apply to commercial kennels for a year excempt euthanasias must be carried out by a vet which take effect immediately. Heck the new standard are not even devloped because no one could agree on what they should be so now it has to wait fot the convening of a special "canine health committee". Yet those changes effecting hobby breeder, hunters, individuals and rescue organization go into effect in 60 day. Hmmm


I'd be interested in knowing how many foster homes are lost because known want to Promendtantly post a kennel License on their front door, allow inspections a minimium of 2 times a year on 36 hours notice, keep paperwork and records on exercising foster in accordance with the rescues new manditory excercise program. That says nothing about the reduculious license holding requirments the require hunters to either have all the dog tags in their pocket or at a minimium the paper licence.

Mike Tefts
 

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All of the "reputable" breeders have forgotten that they started as backyard breeders.[/b]
EXCUSE ME?!?!? :huh: :blink:

Perhaps you might like to rephrase that?
 

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NO-- I would not!!!! Did these breeders magically appear as top show winning breeders ?? NO!!! they started as owners of one or two bassets, possibly from a known breeder, then they got into breeding on a small scale --- now some think that all others should not be allowed to breed bassets

Also the basset was developed as a hunting hound --- what are you and the top breeders doing to preserve and promote the basset as a hunting hound ??????????
 

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NO-- I would not!!!! Did these breeders magically appear as top show winning breeders ?? NO!!! they started as owners of one or two bassets, possibly from a known breeder, then they got into breeding on a small scale --- now some think that all others should not be allowed to breed bassets.[/b]

[rant]

1) Well, actually some of us DID show and win with our dogs before we started breeding. Myself being a case in point. I was in dogs for 11 years before my first litter hit the ground.

2) Being a BYB has nothing to do with the size of the breeding program. It has to do with lack of even basic knowledge of breeding or the breed, usually breeding pets with nothing to recommend them other than they're "cute" or "loveable". I've known some top winning breeders that never kept more than 3 or 4 dogs.

3) And no, I DON'T think that nobody else should breed bassets, but I do think that they should have a clue what the heck they are doing before they start.

4) I have entered in the hunt test at Nationals, even though I have no place or time to practice my dogs. Hold some trials within a 4 hour drive of me and we'll talk. My guys will chase a bunny, though, but I can't let them do it here becuase I'm right on a busy road. One time we stayed with my sister who had a pet bunny, Kermit nearly had a nervous breakdown he wanted that bunny so bad.

When I consider a dog for breeding, I DO ask myself "Could this dog chase rabbits?". And without grounds to run them on, that's about all I can do for now.

Sorry, but I don't criticize field trialer's dogs or thier breeding programs or thier priorities, and I'm really sick of hearing that my show dogs are "sickly, stupid, tempermentally deficient, overbred, inbred, can't get out of their own way and can't hunt."[/rant]
 

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Also the basset was developed as a hunting hound[/b]


depend of the meaning of basset. i.e. basset as any number of dwarf versions of larger hunting hound than yest they were originally breed to hunt game on foot.


if by basset one means specifical the Basset Hound breed well that is a differnent story. They founder wer primarily concerned with what the dog looked like not its ability to hunt. see [ur=http://www.basset.net/balogh2.html]The Early History of the
Basset Hound in England, 1874-1921[/url]
Until the 1890s most of the imports were undertaken for the purpose of showing the dogs and their progeny at dog shows. However, the basset was also slowly discovered as an excellent hunting companion. By the end of the century there were three English packs that hunted on a regular basis.[/b]

History of Basset
In 1890 Godfrey and Christopher Heseltine formed the Walhampton Basset Hounds from stock from existing basset packs. They hunted them in and around the New Forest. Initially they hunted badger but switched to hares in their first season. They found the basset slow, not eager to kill the hare and constitutionally poor. In conjunction with Millais, Krehl and others, the Heseltines set about improving their hounds by selective purchase and breeding with heavy culling. The result was not only successful in the hunting field but also winning numerous Kennel Club prizes thus proving that a first class hunting hound had show ring quality. But disagreements increased between the hunts and the show breeders and, in 1911, the Masters of Basset Hounds Association (MBHA) was formed[/b]
The "Basset Hound" breed was first a show dog that later proved it worth in the field.
 

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At the the risk of going O.T.


Also the basset was developed as a hunting hound[/b]


It all depend of the meaning of basset. i.e. basset as any number of dwarf versions of larger french hunting hound then yes they were originally breed to hunt game on foot. If by basset one means specifical the "Basset Hound "breed well that is a differnent story. They founders were primarily concerned with what the dog looked like not its ability to hunt. see [ur=http://www.basset.net/balogh2.html]The Early History of the
Basset Hound in England, 1874-1921[/url]
Until the 1890s most of the imports were undertaken for the purpose of showing the dogs and their progeny at dog shows. However, the basset was also slowly discovered as an excellent hunting companion. By the end of the century there were three English packs that hunted on a regular basis.[/b]

History of Basset
In 1890 Godfrey and Christopher Heseltine formed the Walhampton Basset Hounds from stock from existing basset packs. They hunted them in and around the New Forest. Initially they hunted badger but switched to hares in their first season. They found the basset slow, not eager to kill the hare and constitutionally poor. In conjunction with Millais, Krehl and others, the Heseltines set about improving their hounds by selective purchase and breeding with heavy culling. The result was not only successful in the hunting field but also winning numerous Kennel Club prizes thus proving that a first class hunting hound had show ring quality. But disagreements increased between the hunts and the show breeders and, in 1911, the Masters of Basset Hounds Association (MBHA) was formed[/b]
The "Basset Hound" breed was first a show dog that later proved it worth in the field.
 
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