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I haven't posted here in years: I have two 9 year old Bassets, one never had major health issues and the other is a total Basset money pit...but I still deeply love both. I have experienced many of the common and uncommon issues with this lovable breed, from rock swallowing, front leg deformities, to glaucoma. The most current issue I dealt with is glaucoma. Apparently Bassets are one of the breeds commonly afflicted with Glaucoma. I want to inform Basset owners of the early signs...which I and the Vet overlooked. The first sign of Glaucoma in my hound started with a slight bit of fog or haze in his eye. It would increase with stress, such as taking him for car rides (which he negatively associates with the Vet). The Vet prescribed him a steroid eye drop. I gave him this eye drop for about 18 months with some success. Eventually the eye worsened by appearing more foggy, red, and sensitive to the touch on the closed eye lid. At this point I returned to the Vet and they finally took an eye pressure test finding the pressures were way above the safe zone. Long story short (too late I know) he went to a Veterinary eye specialist who officially determined he had glaucoma (extreme in right eye with severe damage being almost blind, and a slight amount in left eye with no damage detected). He was prescribed several expensive eye drops and pills which he took for almost 4 months, seeming to control the Glaucoma effects. Eventually the pressure in his right eye began to rise again and he had to have the right eye completely surgically removed. Once Glaucoma starts it can be slowed down, but will eventually worsen. The drops and pills are not a long term treatment for Glaucoma (unless caught very early), only temporary. What I want to stress for the eye health of your hound(s) is starting at the age of 2yrs, have a Vet check the eye pressures at least semi annually even if the eyes appear ok. Glaucoma can be detected fairly early with a simple low cost pressure check and visual examination by your Vet. I wish I did this for my hound much earlier. I also wish the original Vet checked his eye pressures when the first symptom of haze and fog were observed. My one eyed Basset is adjusting just fine to his new Cyclops way of life. I do believe his sense of smell has increased, since he sniffs things even longer while out on walks!:cool:
 

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So sorry you and your hound have had to experience this painful condition which is known within the breed and certain bloodlines at that. Have you told his breeder, if still breeding because this combination should NEVER be repeated. There is a test - a goniodysgenesis test which "is the presdisposing abnormality to primary angle closure glaucoma. It can only be detected by gonioscopy. This examination is not part of the routine eye examination ......" From the UK KC list of schemes available under the KC.BVA .

Good breeders in the UK routinely have their breeding stock tested before being bred from these days.
 

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IN US the value of gonioscopy is highly limited and dubious at best. For Primary Open angle Glaucoma which is the rare form in basset hand and first discovered in UK there is a genetic test. Two Independent Mutations in ADAMTS17 Are Associated with Primary Open Angle Glaucoma in the Basset Hound and Basset Fauve de Bretagne Breeds of Dog - PubMed But with Importations increaseing from Europe the incidents are increase in US. We have our breeding stock tested via paw print genetics and they are negative for it. Paw Print Genetics - Primary Open Angle Glaucoma (Basset Hound Type) Gondiocopy is of limit value with Closed angle gaucoma in basset hounds as a predictor of dog that will or will become affected.
Gonioscopy is a technique that uses a special lens to allow the ophthalmologist to view the iridocorneal angle. In our experience gonioscopy can predict glaucoma only in cases where the angle appears narrow or completely closed. While this may be the case in some animals we believe that more commonly the cleft, a narrow structure behind the angle, collapses. The cleft is very hard, if not impossible, to see using gonioscopy ...A second complication during gonioscopy is the frequent presence of pectinate ligament dysplasia (PLD) in Basset Hounds. PLD are strands of connective tissue that can form in front of the angle. While the presence of some of these strands is normal, PLD refers to a situation where this material begins to look more like a sheet and not individual strands. The presence of PLD obscures the view of the angle in gonioscopy.
Based upon our current knowledge the presence of PLD is not a good indication whether a Basset will develop glaucoma or not. The vast majority of Bassets with PLD will not develop glaucoma, but some will. On the other hand, we have seen Bassets that develop aggressive glaucoma in the absence of any PLD.
Ultra High reslution Ultra sound is much more effective,. but costly and limitied availability Newly developed early canine glaucoma tests should help owners of breeding dogs • News Service • Iowa State University
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
IN US the value of gonioscopy is highly limited and dubious at best. For Primary Open angle Glaucoma which is the rare form in basset hand and first discovered in UK there is a genetic test. Two Independent Mutations in ADAMTS17 Are Associated with Primary Open Angle Glaucoma in the Basset Hound and Basset Fauve de Bretagne Breeds of Dog - PubMed But with Importations increaseing from Europe the incidents are increase in US. We have our breeding stock tested via paw print genetics and they are negative for it. Paw Print Genetics - Primary Open Angle Glaucoma (Basset Hound Type) Gondiocopy is of limit value with Closed angle gaucoma in basset hounds as a predictor of dog that will or will become affected.
Ultra High reslution Ultra sound is much more effective,. but costly and limitied availability Newly developed early canine glaucoma tests should help owners of breeding dogs • News Service • Iowa State University
Thank you both for your detailed info. I'm into Bassets for the love of this lovable dog breed, not breeding or showing them. My hound was obviously not AKC registered, and I have lost touch with the one-time home breeder long ago. I got him when he was only 10 weeks old. My suggestion to anyone buying / adopting a Basset that's not registered and from from a proven award winning breeder, is to never buy under the age of 1+ year. This way you should be able to observe some physical deformities that won't show up when just a pup; such as leg issues, which mine also had. Anyway, "keep an eye on your hound's eyes." Glaucoma is a very serious and expensive condition some Bassets are prone to have.
 
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