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I never had this issue come up when we got our last basset Ceasar because it was the dead of a Canadian winter and was too cold to really be outside too much. However, we are having unseasonably warm weather. It is the first green xmas I remember for a long time. Anyway, it is nice weather to get outside with the new puppy but I remember hearing that you aren't supposed to be walking them around other dogs, etc until they have had all their shots? Is this true? Toby is just 9 weeks old now and isn't scheduled for second round of shots until he is 11 weeks (according to paperwork from breeder). Any advice?
 

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we walked ours at 10 weeks for 15 mins on a lead. and did not let her get in contact with any other animals until well after the injections. not sure if it was the right thing to be done but im sure many people do it.

Clare
 

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Our vet told us not to walk them until they have had all their shots. She said it doesn't matter if they’re not around other dogs or not they can still pick up disease on their paws from the ground where other dogs may have walked previously. Then when they lick their paws they will get sick. I know it’s hard to wait, I couldn’t' wait till I could get my two out for a walk.
 

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I remember hearing that you aren't supposed to be walking them around other dogs, etc until they have had all their shots? Is this true? Toby is just 9 weeks old now and isn't scheduled for second round of shots until he is 11 weeks (according to paperwork from breeder). Any advice?[/b]
Don't forget a third round at around 18 weeks.
from Vaccination Recommendations for Puppies (Puppy Shots)
The length and timing of the window of susceptibility is different in every litter, and even between individuals in a litter. A study of a cross section of different puppies showed that the age at which they were able to respond to a vaccine and develop protection (become immunized) covered a wide period of time. At six weeks of age, 25% of the puppies could be immunized. At 9 weeks of age, 40% of the puppies were able to respond to the vaccine. The number increased to 60% by 16 weeks of age, and by 18 weeks, 95% of the puppies could be immunized. [/b]
the Risk of disease is small but real however the the risk of poor socialization is as real and very high for the pups tha do not get out. Life if full of risk it comes down to balancing those risk. Most Vets are not truelycognizant of the risk associated with isolation.

Puppy Socialisation and Habituation (Part 1) - Why is it Necessary?
One in five of the dogs that Dr Valerie O’Farrell (1986) studied while conducting research at Edinburgh (Royal Dick) University Veterinary School had a behavioural problem to a lesser or greater extent. A similar, but larger, American study fixed the figure at one in four. In one year my practice treated 773 dogs - 79 of them, that’s 10 percent, had problems of fearfulness towards people or the environment due to a lack of early socialisation or habituation and a further 4.5. percent were inept at relating to other dogs, again due to a lack of early socialisation. The problem is immeasurably greater than these figures suggest. Many dogs show a weakness of temperament or inability to cope when faced with a particular situation, without their behaviour becoming problematical enough for the owners to seek help from a behavioural counsellor.[/b]
Hmm perhaps the higher numbers in US are a result of over caution and vet recoomendations.
 

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I have owned a difficult, unsocialized rescue, and this experience has influenced me to actively socialize my own dogs. My last two puppies came home between 10 and 14 weeks. I started socializing them as soon as possible. Caper was enrolled in a handling class at 12 weeks, entered in her first shows at 6 months and picked up her first 2 points that weekend. :)
 
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