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When we got Bella as a 5 month old pup we knew we could only giver her 20 minute walks which she did daily. This was never a problem as she was always a little nervous on walks. Now she has much more confidence and enthusiasm, so when can we extend these walks and how far can we go? we sometimes have 30 minutes and she's ok but she does like her naps after walks! Suggestions in time would great as miles don't mean much to me! We can go at a fairly good pace when she's not sniffing! the ground we cover is mixed, sometimes pavements and sometimes woodland paths and fields.
 

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nothing and I mean nothing engenders more controversy on this site than what you bring up. In GB the KC and vets etc recommend no more than 10 minutes of age for each month of age no more than twice a day. They are the only country to do so based on one small study on Labrador's that concluded exercise in puppies increase Hip dysplasia risk. Personally I think that the Recommendation is b.s. And you need to use your puppy as a guide. That said you want to increase exercise slowly and incrementally. This is the article I link to when the Subject comes up. as it deals with the issue fairly and factually
Exercise in Puppies-Are there rules? | The SkeptVet Blog
"The research evidence, then, really does not provide anything like a definitive answer to questions about the effects of exercise in growing puppies. Common sense suggests that forcing a dog to exercise heavily when it does not wish to is not a good idea. Likewise, puppies sometimes have more enthusiasm than sense and can exercise to the point of heat exhaustion, blistered footpads, and other damage that may be less obvious. Therefore, a general principle of avoiding forced or voluntary extreme exercise is reasonable, but specific and absolute statements about what kind of exercise is allowed, what surfaces puppies should or should not exercise on, and so forth is merely opinion not supported by objective data. Such opinions may very well be informed by personal experience, and they may be reliable, but any opinion not founded on objective data must always be taken with a grain of salt and accepted provisionally until such data is available."
So basically when it comes to exercise and puppies at this point it is all conjecture and personal experience, which is going to vary widely with no definitive consensus. In the end you are going to have to decide for your self what you think is reasonable .
 

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nothing and I mean nothing engenders more controversy on this site than what you bring up. In GB the KC and vets etc recommend no more than 10 minutes of age for each month of age no more than twice a day. They are the only country to do so based on one small study on Labrador's that concluded exercise in puppies increase Hip dysplasia risk. Personally I think that the Recommendation is b.s..
Actually it's 5 minutes per month, of on lead exercise.

'Nothing engenders more controversy on this site', only when others give different advice to yours & then it's 'personally I think that the Recommendation is b.s.'

The recommendations are not only the KC, but many breed clubs in the UK & Europe.

I'm curious, are the disastrous looking legs on this site all due to genetics?
 

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yes it is genetics
Then there's a huge number of very poorly dogs, not forgetting the added arthritis is later years.

But IMHO to use your language think it's B.S & exacerbated by over exercise, allowing young dogs to jump up & down including stairs.
 

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Then there's a huge number of very poorly dogs, not forgetting the added arthritis is later years.

But IMHO to use your language think it's B.S & exacerbated by over exercise, allowing young dogs to jump up & down including stairs.
Actually, in North America, yes there is a huge number of very poorly bred dogs. Really, it's a big problem here. And nobody is recommending excessive exercise or jumping up and down for young dogs, we just think the 5 minute recommendation is ridiculously low and possibly even unhealthy. My hounds are neither forced to exercise nor restricted, and I'm certainly not having leg issues.
 

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young dogs to jump up & down including stairs.
depends on your definition of young dogs but I would agree on anything younger than six months That is very different from leash walking.

Also keep in mind in the US the traditional age to spay and neuter is six month . This is typical of the start of Forelimbs growth plate closures. neutering delays crowth plate closure so spaying at this time might exacerbate angular limb deformities as some growth plate have closed and the neutering delays the closure of others causing bone pairs like the ulna and radius to grow out of sink.


FWIW in agility we do not do any jump training until the growth plates are closed

PROVET HEALTHCARE INFORMATION - Growth Plate Closure Times - Dogs
 

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guess you never met Mariah LOL ! temperament is both genetic and environmental and a good dose of how they mix together so it is really hard to what the cause of a temperament issue in an individual dog is but when you see large number of problem from the same breeder you have to highly suspect a good dose of genetic. but given they all come out of a similar environment that can not be ruled out as the cause
 

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I really didn't want to get involved in this one BUT I really don't care about Labrador studies or any Skepvet - nothing to do with our individual hounds. The 5 minute guideline is just that and to me quite a good one. FORCED lead walk should be done gradually - nothing to do with free play or running around the garden - it is about building up your hound gradually. Mrs Keevil recommended this back in the 50's with her hunting hounds and George Johnston talks about limited exercise in his book from the 60's. In fact both of them are a lot more conservative about exercise. It's best to go slowly - with big boned - slow growing, short legged dogs, with a lot of weight on their front. You never know what too much too soon can do - Bad development, premature arthretis, bad fronts, injuries that don't heal properly - personally I like to be on the side of caution.
And no it's not all genetics. Care and diet...
 

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the side of caution comes with risk as well knuckling over, ie carpal laxticity has lack of exercise as a contributing factor. It is one area in dogs were opinion rules the day and argument tend to get heat because it is strictly opinion and not fact based. No one is right and no one is wrong.
 

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Well and yes I know all about calcium and phosphorous ratios, vit D, the fallacies of too much protein and the problems of too many calories etc.... And yes when I said care about the right enviroment along with too much exercise too soon :eek: not something we will ever agree on....
 

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Shakespeare.

LOL, it genetics!!

It reminds me. Occasionally when we're out I'll ask another dog owner to recall theirs as it follows us into the road or rushes in at speed when ours are on lead & the come back is. 'What's wrong with your dogs' or the all time classic 'My dogs are fine, really friendly' & as soon as I hear the words know there is no point in continuing. Basically it means, my dogs O.K, don't care or think about anyone or anything else, you're in my way, I'm right & you're wrong.

Thought I'd seen some pretty poor hounds but nothing compared to legs & feet here.

Genetics, does that mean there is no responsibility & it's someone else's fault? LOL
 

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YEP Bad breeders = bad care! They don't have any proper information/care to give to the owners of their puppies. Nurture/nature
 

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YEP Bad breeders = bad care! They don't have any proper information/care to give to the owners of their puppies. Nurture/nature
it is more don't give a rats behind, Keep in mind however when it comes to front ends it is multiple genes at work in concert so an outcross between to lines which each have great fronts and equal horrible front because the combination of genes is not right. IMHO it one reason line breeding is prevalent in basset it is the only way to maintain the front end over an extended period of time in a breeding program.

I tend to look at it the other way however in that breeders are using Over exercise as an excuse for why some of there progeny are not quite up to snuff. IE its not our fault you raise the wrong. But as with all genetics there is an interaction with the environment and it is next to impossible to tell were genetics ends and environment begins. I almost pretty certain when it comes to practice we are actual not that far apart or as far apart as we make it sound.
 

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What a debate.....
If I am honest I try and let Inky tell me what she wants... We have a big garden so she does run up and down as fast as she can some days or if we are at the farm she runs every where, on those days I wouldn't walk her out on a lead its home to sleep all afternoon. If she wants to go out she will sit by the front door with her face pushed on the the door with her nose pointing in the air! so I take her around the block about 5.-10 mins. I carry her up all stairs unless the stair gate is left open and she darts up.... she does jump on and off the sofa, I do lift her on and off but I cant catch her every time. If I listened to every bit of info re exercising bassets she would never go out and I would wrap her up in a huge ball of cotton wool till she was about 2 lol.....I do the very best I can for her in every way I hope I am raising her ok and she is a healthy adult.
 
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