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Discussion Starter #1
So I was talking with a coworker whose 12 week old puppy just had her rabies vaccination. They got the puppy at our local Humane Society and use the vet clinic there.

However my vet says not to do the rabies until 6 months??
This is the schedule for my basset...

5 weeks- parvo/corona/distemper ** done **
7 weeks-parvo/corona/distemper ** done **

10 weeks- parvo/corona/distemper
13 weeks p/c/d
16 weeks- p/c/d booster

6 months- rabies

Does this seem right? At what point is it going to be safe for me to take her out and socialize her with other dogs? I was hoping to start puppy class at 10 weeks. Thanks!
 

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If it were me, I wouldn't be taking a puppy to classes with other dogs until innoculations were finished... but I have no idea about the Rabies one. According to what I have always been told by breeders and vets, Basset pups shouldn't be walking more than a few minutes for several months yet...

As a suggestion, if you want to socialise pup, you could do what I did... drive to the local beach or park and sit on a seat and wait for people & dogs coming along and walk my pups towards them every now and again to get them used to meeting other dogs, but I only walked them in very short 'bursts' of a few minutes at a time and they got loads of exercise playing around the garden with each other and then going inside for sleeps every now and again when they'd had enough!
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks Sophie for the suggestion. The park is a good idea to just go and hang out. Plus my daughter would love to run and burn some energy while Millie and I watch. If only it would stop raining or snowing here!

I want to do whatever is best for the dog. Most people I know all get their puppies into the puppy classes between 10-12 weeks at the local humane society. If that isn't appropriate for the basset though that is good to know!
 

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If it were me, I wouldn't be taking a puppy to classes with other dogs until innoculations were finished... but I have no idea about the Rabies one. According to what I have always been told by breeders and vets, Basset pups shouldn't be walking more than a few minutes for several months yet...

As a suggestion, if you want to socialise pup, you could do what I did... drive to the local beach or park and sit on a seat and wait for people & dogs coming along and walk my pups towards them every now and again to get them used to meeting other dogs,
an adult dog is more likely to be a carrier of a disease without out showing sypmtoms than a puppy so contact with adult dogs is actual more risky than puppies. That said it is a bad idea to limit social contact between the ages of 8 to 16 weeks.

see Position Statement on Puppy Socialization
The primary and mos timportanttime for puppy socialization is the first three months of life.1, 2 During this time puppies should be exposed to as many new people, animals, stimuli and environments as can be achieved safely and without causing overstimulation manifested as excessive fear, withdrawal or avoidance behavior. For this reason, the American Veterinary Society of Animal Behavior believes that it should be the standard of care for puppies to receive such socialization before they are fully vaccinated.

Because the first three months are the period when sociability outweighs fear, this is the primary window of opportunity for puppies to adapt to new people, animals, and experiences. Incomplete or improper socialization during this important time can increase the risk of behavioral problems later in life including fear, avoidance, and/or aggression. Behavioral problems are the greatest threat to the owner-dog bond. In fact, behavioral problems are the number one cause of relinquishment to shelters.3 Behavioral issues, not infectious diseases, are the number one cause of death for dogs under three years of age.


... Enrolling in puppy classes prior to three months of age can be an excellent means of improving training, strengthening the human-animal bond, and socializing puppies in an environment where risk of illness can be minimized.

In general, puppies can start puppy socialization classes as early as 7-8 weeks of age. Puppies should receive a minimum of one set of vaccines at least 7 days prior to the first class and a first deworming. They should be kept up-to-date on vaccines throughout the class.

see Vaccination Recommendations for Puppies (Puppy Shots)

Canine Vaccination Guidelines
 

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Thank you Mikey. So would you suggest going ahead with the puppy class then?
provided that all puppies are require at least one series of core vaccines and they are on a reasonable schedual to prevent infection ie shots ~ every 3 weeks of core vaccines. and the dogs are on wormers or have test clear for worms , not to do so would be a disservice to the puppy.

the following 4 articles outline the most critical aspects of insuring a puppy becomes a well adusted adult. THey are long but well worth the read to prevent future problems

Puppy Socialisation and Habituation (Part 1) Why is it Necessary?

Puppy Socialisation and Habituation (Part 2) How to go about it

Bite Inhibition - How to Teach It
Rather than "No bite," I strongly, strongly, strongly urge you to teach your puppy bite inhibition instead. Bite inhibition is a "soft mouth." It teaches the pup how to use his mouth gently. Does this mean that the pup will forever be mouthing you? No, not at all. Actually, regardless of the method used, puppies generally grow out of mouthing behavior after a few months.So why should you teach bite inhibition? Because dogs have one defense: their teeth. Every dog can bite. If frightened enough or in pain or threatened, your dog *will* bite. That doesn't in any way make him a "bad" dog. It makes him a dog. It's your responsibility, therefore, to teach your dog that human skin is incredibly fragile. If you teach your dog bite inhibition that training will carry over even if he is later in a position where he feels forced to bite.
Countdown to a Crackerjack Canine Companion


I only walked them in very short 'bursts' of a few minutes at a time and they got loads of exercise playing around the garden with each other and then going inside for sleeps every now and again when they'd had enough
it is well known I and Sophie B disagree on puppy exercise but this we do agree that exercise is best done off leash. A leash can compel a puppy to over do it where off leash this is virtually impossible. Care must be taken when leash walking to be sure the puppy is capable of the distance traveled. if the dog start to stop moving etc it is agood sign that it is tried or overwhelmed it is better to carry the dog back and do less distance the next time, don't worry about creating a situation in which the dog learns it controls the walks. If walks are done in a non-confrontational way the dog will look eagarly to them rather than them becomeing a wrestling match with a flat basset that refuses to move.
 

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Another option is to look into puppy socialization parties. My vet holds puppy parties every other Friday night where puppies play together and play with new people (and kids). Molly enjoyed them and really blossomed socially, but she's grown too old for them now. I know some kennels/doggie day cares in my area hold socialization gatherings too. Check with your vet, the humane society, or even local pet stores.
 

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Another option is to look into puppy socialization parties
imho the more important aspect of puppy classes is socialization, so a situation that emphysises socialization over obedience training is preferable to the other way round.
 

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Not trying to start anything but that sounds like an awful lot of vaccinations. There are new protocalls all the time ,over vaccinating a puppy seems more dangerous to me. Screwing up the dogs immune system would concern me.I know we have discussed this with Krista in one of the other forums. You may want to look through them,health and gentics possibly.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Bubbad- I will go look for some info on that. Thanks!

As far as the classes I go the one my friend is going to right now is really mostly just the puppies playing together. They work on one command a week I think.
 

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Another option is to look into puppy socialization parties. My vet holds puppy parties every other Friday night where puppies play together and play with new people (and kids). Molly enjoyed them and really blossomed socially, but she's grown too old for them now. I know some kennels/doggie day cares in my area hold socialization gatherings too. Check with your vet, the humane society, or even local pet stores.
That sounds a nice friendly way of socialising young puppies with other dogs and people.:D
 

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it is well known I and Sophie B disagree on puppy exercise but this we do agree that exercise is best done off leash. A leash can compel a puppy to over do it where off leash this is virtually impossible. Care must be taken when leash walking to be sure the puppy is capable of the distance traveled. if the dog start to stop moving etc it is agood sign that it is tried or overwhelmed it is better to carry the dog back and do less distance the next time, don't worry about creating a situation in which the dog learns it controls the walks. If walks are done in a non-confrontational way the dog will look eagarly to them rather than them becomeing a wrestling match with a flat basset that refuses to move.
I'm pleased we agree too Mikey... and occasionally I have seen people that I want to shout at when they are 'dragging' young puppies (various breeds) along, when clearly they look too young and probably are tired to be kept constantly on the move.... whereas exercise off the leash in a safe place (or in the garden) allows pup to rest now and again rather than be forced along by the owner!

Regarding limiting exercise of Basset pups (not taking them out for long walks on leashes whilst young) has often been mentioned by breeders and vets in the five different areas of the UK that I have lived in and having adhered to this, three generations of my Basset owning family have not had any joint or back problems... probably helped by keeping them off stairs too!
 

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there is a big difference between limiting exercise and limiting on leash walks.
Exercise for any dog is best done off leash. For most dog and puppies. leash walking at a human pace is not exercise. it is not fast enough to be effective. That said for the very young it is easy to over do it. one needs to systematically build up the endurance and fitness level of a pup or dog to avoid injury. The most common dogs injured are the weekend warrior type athletes that go full bore occsional with the family but the rest of the time recieve little to no exercise and conditioning.
 

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5 weeks- parvo/corona/distemper ** done **
7 weeks-parvo/corona/distemper ** done **

10 weeks- parvo/corona/distemper
13 weeks p/c/d
16 weeks- p/c/d booster
fwiw any vaccine before six weeks other than parvo is totally useless. corona vaccine is never needed. ewait six months for a rabies vaccine is as the far end of the scale. 12 weeks minimium, sixteen typical.

Parvo is not a core vaccine in only needs to be given if the puppy is at elivated risk. Contact with other puppies that you do not know the living conditions/precautions such as a puppy class would constitute and elivated risk iMHO bordetella vaccines fall in the same boat but being bacteria in nature the immunity is less than a year. 6 month is typical if the dog is kenneled with other dogs or has frequent contact. FWIW I do numerious dog shows an never vaccinate for bordatella no had I ever had a bout of kennel cough. unless a puppy or an imune comprimised oldster it is exceedingly rare for it to be fatal so IMHO unless required by a facility the dog will be attending the risk out ways the benefit.

see the vaccine schedules I posted earlier.
 

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This is the standard vaccination schedule for the clinic I work at:

3 to 4 week Litter Package: All puppies Examined, Deworming & free exam for Mom of puppies: Total $48 (regardless of # of Puppies)

8 weeks: Basic Puppy #1, Exam, DHP-PV, Fecal, Deworming
12 weeks: Basic Puppy #2, Exam, DHP-PV, Corona, Deworming
16 weeks: Basic Puppy # 3, Exam, DHP-PV, Rabies, Fecal, Deworming
 

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I agree that seems like an awful lot of vaccinations.

My puppies get their first shots at 8 weeks, then at 12 and 16 weeks, and rabies at 6 months.
 

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As far as excercising my puppy goes, the best form is him chasing, romping with my 13yr old out in the yard....it starts off with him keeping up w/ my son the first trip, then falling alittle behind and my son laughing and waiting till Woody (the puppy) taking short cuts or just watching....it is adorable to watch and I know that he is getting exercise and not being pushed.

Woody and his mom
 

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I agree that seems like an awful lot of vaccinations.

My puppies get their first shots at 8 weeks, then at 12 and 16 weeks, and rabies at 6 months.
That's the vaccination schedule we followed with Virga. Along with de-wormings however many times were necessary to clear them up. But with Doppler, since we didn't get him until he was four months old, we had to do all of his later in his life. And of course both of them get boosters whenever needed and rabies once a year.
 
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