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Hello Fellow Basset Lovers:

My basset, Shackleton was just diagnosed with a bad yeast infection under both of his front arms. It has become almost black and flakey. (Gross!) The vet gave us an anti-fungal shampoo to soak him in, and a topical anti-fungal treatment as well.

I have heard of yeast infections in their ears-but have you seen this under the arms? We have to go back to the vet to see if oral treatments are needed.

Any info would be greatly appreciated!
 

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It's great that you're using your vet as your main source for information. I can just speak in general terms: bassets are prone to allergy and skin problems, and the moisture in skin folds seems to be conducive to promoting yeast problems in some dogs. Murray has more problems with this in the summer when it's humid. Our vet gave me a Malaseb flush to clean these areas. If they develop into raw sore areas, he gave me Gentocin spray (antibiotic/cortisone) which works great to heal those areas. I use Gold Bond Medicated Baby Powder under his arms and neck area to keep things dry- that seems to help. Food allergies were also an issue with Murray's skin, and when I changed his food to Wellness Fish and Sweet Potato (no corn, beef or poultry which he was allergic to)his problem with itching disappeared.I hope something I said helps.
 

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"I have heard of yeast infections in their ears-but have you seen this under the arms?"

very common in basset. This is a warm moist area with skin folds that allow yeast to thrive. Some find baby powder or similar drying agent is all that is necessary to keep it from becoming and ongoing problem.

However most yeast infections have an underlying cause. In basset hounds one of those underlying causes is ussual an allergy or seborrhea. One the yeast infection is under control The vet may start looking for a cause.

some useful links

MALESSEZIA DERMATITIS "So what conditions lead to a yeast proliferation? An increase in skin oils (which often occurs in an allergic flare up) would be the most common situation. Sometimes there is an immune deficiency which allows the yeast proliferation. Some animals are battling seborrhea (excessive oil production of the skin) and thus are naturally predisposed to the yeast proliferation. Some animals are actually allergic to the yeasts themselves. The most important thing to realize is that yeast infections are not contagious but they tend to recur unless the underlying allergy, seborrhea, or whatever problem is controlled.

The following breeds are predisposed genetically to yeast infections: the West Highland White Terrier, Basset hound, Cocker spaniel, Silky terrier, Australian terrier, Maltese, Chihuahua, Poodle, Shetland sheepdog, Lhasa apso, and the dachshund"

Seborrhea "Primary seborrhea is an inherited disorder of the skin in which the outer layer of the skin (the epidermis), the sebaceous glands, and part of the hair follicles are hyperproductive. The rate of cell turnover in these tissues is significantly increased, causing excessive production of scale (dry flakes of skin) and sebum (fatty lubricating substance). Seborrhea oleosa is the more greasy form while seborrhea sicca is a dryer form. Many dogs have a combination of both types. Chronic waxy ear infections (otitis externa) also occur commonly as part of this disorder.

Signs of primary seborrhea are usually apparent by a year of age. Affected dogs are often greasy, scaly and smelly.

...Primary seborrhea is most commonly seen in the American cocker spaniel, West Highland white terrier, English springer spaniel, and Basset hound"

Merk Veterinary Manual - Seborrhea Introduction

[ January 30, 2006, 08:51 PM: Message edited by: Mikey T ]
 
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Bubba had yeast problems in his arm pits in the summer months. He had a very large chest and as a result deep arm pits. The vet prescribed "Malaseb pledgets", very thin medicated pads, that we used to wipe down the area which cleared it up after a couple of weeks.
As a prevenative our vet also had us get "acidophilus/lactobacillus" (use 1/4 to 1/2 of human dosage)which are capsules that you can purchase at the health food stores that contain the same thing that yogart does. We gave him that daily, year round. We also used the Gold Bond Medicated Powder which really helped keep things drier in the summer and sprinkled it on three times a week in the winter and daily in the summer.
You've done the right thing taking him to the vet. Follow your vet's advice, and next time there you might ask about these other items if you are still having problems. Different vets use different products and acheive the same result.
Some Bassets have food allergies that can cause skin problems as well. Good luck.
 
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Don't know for sure, but I think frequent bathing might make the problem worse by keeping the areas damp. The yeast likes the warm damp. I think using a powder would be better as it would help keep the area dry.

Janet 'n Twinkie
 

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"Would regular bathing help with the yeast infections? "

Depends on the cause of the yeast infection, If it is a result of Seborrhea frequent baths would help provide it is with the proper medicated shampoo, If it is allergies or other cause it is much less likely to help.

Also frequent baths on dogs with normal skin can cause the skin to dry out. That sounds good for preventing yeast infections right? Not really cause often what happens with dry skin is the oil gland go into over production actual making it a much more conducive environment for yeast.

Your probably more likely to increase the risk of a yeast infection with frequent bath but as stated above there is no simple yes or no answer it depends on the cause.
 

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We just had our two in for their checkups and we mentioned to our vet that Luther has this problem. Mike had mentioned using Gold Bond and the vet said powder would work to keep it dry (there is no infection yet - it's just moist & a little sticky) but first we should try earwipes. They are like Epiotic ear cleaner only in round disk form. He said to load them up with additional Epiotic and gently wipe the area a few times a day. If it improves over a few days or weeks then that should be a normal maintenance function - just like his ears. Then we can also use the powder to help it stay dry and less itchy.

We only just started this but I'll let you know if works.
 

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I realize this is a VERY old post, but my Pierre also suffers from underarm yeast infections. We've treated with everything known to man. My vet recommended frequent bathing as well. We tried the Malaseb shampoo along with topical treatments and internal treatments (pills of all kinds), but he still suffers from it all year long. My vet finally recommended, because of price restrictions, shampooing frequently with Nizoral A-D shampoo. It seems to help along with cleaning the underarms with alcohol to keep it dried out. It's not the best treatment, but the alternative is dangerous to him. I'll keep doing this.
 

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Snoopy's skin on his belly, and under his arms gets really red and itchy sometimes in the summer. He loves to have GoldBond Medicated powder on him, it makes him feel much better. But it is used in mild skin irritation only, not severe cases.
 

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My basset had the worst ears you have ever seen or at least I had ever seen and I have just gotten them under control. She not only had the yeast infection but also bacterial infection, that's the one that was so hard to kill. I got the yeast killed and of course didn't know it because there was still dark brown stuff coming out. Took her back to the vet and they had to do ear swabs and I had to doctor her twice a day for a good month.

I know like Mikey T says I think it is an under lying problem from allergies. Have you though if you aren't already on it a grain free food? That's one of the biggest food allergies.

It is no fun I have been at this for 2 1/2 years on and off. And I have to be very careful because she will eat the bird seed if I'm not careful and it was starting to come back but I think I got it killed again, they are looking good. I just have to clean them about every 3 days.
 

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It seems to help along with cleaning the underarms with alcohol to keep it dried out
besides a drying agent alcohol is antimicrobial as well

You can try malacetic wipe acetic acid (vinegar) and boric acid 1% or make your own wipes using vinegar, listerine, witch hazel etc.

If the dog is not licking the area medicated (athelets foots powders) work well at keeping yeast/fugus in check as well.
 

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I know like Mikey T says I think it is an under lying problem from allergies. Have you though if you aren't already on it a grain free food? That's one of the biggest food allergies
A year round problem tends not to be atopy because that is generally seasonal in naturel but some dogs have multiple allergies or are allerging to indoor contaminantes like dust/dustmites etc. Food allergies are another allergic source that is consistent for year round problem but food allergies acount for only 10-15% of alll allergies in dogs so it is much less freguent than made out and dogs the suffer from food allergies also tend to have other allergies as well.

I think it is important to point out the inacurracies in the Grains are a leading cause of food allergies. not because it is untrue, which it is but because it the basis of much of dog food diet myths. Food allergies are caused by proteins in dogs that are supceptable /prone to develop a food allergy Most grains contain some protein and as such are capable of causing an allergic reaction in dog but at the same time the carbo soucres in non-grain dog food also general contain protein an are cable of creating an allergyt as well. What the dog that is suceptable/prone to food allergies is going to become allergic to is the protein source that it comes into the most contact with. There is some variation base on the length of protein chain as to susceptibily in causing an allergy but this is minor and general play in to the hand of meat actually being more allergic than grains,

Food Allergies and Food Intolerance
Several studies have shown that some ingredients are more likely to cause food allergies than others. In order of the most common offenders in dogs are beef, dairy products, chicken, lamb, fish, chicken eggs, corn, wheat, and soy. As you may have noticed, the most common offenders are the most common ingredients in dog foods. This correlation is not a coincidence. While some proteins might be slightly more antigenic than others, many proteins are similar in form and the incidence of allergic reactions are probably associated with the amount of exposure
IT is not the ingredient that causes the allergy in the first place so thes common pet food ingredient get a bad rap because they are associated with food allergies but they are only associated with them because the are coomon dog food ingredients. If grain free diet becones the norm more dogs will be allergic to meat based proteins and or potatoes or other grain substitute and few will be allergic to grain. it does litte to blame the ingredient as the cause of the allergy an allergy occurs in a dog that is prone to it in the first place,.
 

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Pierre's is pretty severe. :( But due to his age, there isn't a great deal I can do. I certainly won't let him take anything that would hurt him (like 1 of the medications--strong potential for liver damage) or make him even more uncomfortable. What I'm doing seems to keep him comfortable, so I'll go with it. I also use powder sometimes. I just use foot powder rather than Gold Bond. If I was more faithful to it, I could probably cure it altogether
 

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Well, stupid me didn't see the other replies. Sorry folks. Yes, Pierre has multiple allergies--dust mites, grass, wheat and cedar, to name a few. He's my little "allergic to the world" dog. :) He's been on a grain-free food for years. As for licking, he does it all the time. I do put foot powder on his armpits, but can't on his elbow. As I said earlier, I'm not faithful enough to completely cure it, sadly. I also use witch hazel in his ears to clean them as well as alcohol to dry them. I've got those pretty much cleared up; just working on his pits now and 1 of his elbows. After just a few days from being shampoo'ed, he's already licking the elbow. I've been trying to be steadier. Poor thing
 
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