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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all,

Sorry it's been a while. I've just seen that the Basset Hound Rescue Network have an extremely urgent need for a foster placement for 2 bonded male bassets, aged 1 and 6 years old. They're currently in Telford, but could be transported wherever required.

If you can help please get in touch with them and please share this with any other UK basset groups you know:
https://www.facebook.com/bassetrescuenetworkgb/posts/1620288924857128?fref=nf

Thank you,

Lynda
 

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Hi all,

Sorry it's been a while. I've just seen that the Basset Hound Rescue Network have an extremely urgent need for a foster placement for 2 bonded male bassets, aged 1 and 6 years old. They're currently in Telford, but could be transported wherever required.

If you can help please get in touch with them and please share this with any other UK basset groups you know:
https://www.facebook.com/bassetrescuenetworkgb/posts/1620288924857128?fref=nf
I note that one person on Facebook has offered to take them .... so hopefully this has worked out. I'm not familiar with this organisation but have they
1. Contacted the relevant Rep. (area) with Basset Welfare?
2. Been onto whoever bred these two? Even if they can't accommodate two males (particularly), they may well know of somebody who could, depending on for how long. Or other breeders within a reasonable area of where these two currently are?
3. Again depending on for how long - Boarding Kennel? Most would give a reduction for sharing, and probably also for longer-term boarders.

Hopefully they will be able to be fostered together as separating them, at a time when they will be bewildered, could be the worst thing they could do. People don't always realise what a bond like this really means.
 

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People don't always realise what a bond like this really means.
Which is why I always recommend against acquiring littermates which tend to form even tighter bonds than unrelated dogs.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thank you for the reply FranksMum. I passed those suggestions on by email (I'm not on Facebook) in case they're any use. It looks like they've had another offer since then as well, so hopefully that means it's sorted. I'm not affiliated with them and they're all busy volunteers so often they don't get round to updating people on these situations for a while!
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Which is why I always recommend against acquiring littermates which tend to form even tighter bonds than unrelated dogs.
A lot of breeders don't tell buyers this though. If a buyer wants two dogs 'to keep each other company' it must be hard to convince them otherwise.
 

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A lot of breeders don't tell buyers this though. If a buyer wants two dogs 'to keep each other company' it must be hard to convince them otherwise.
Sadly IMO, indicates more of the 'needs' of the purchaser & the dubious 'ethics' of a breeder.
 

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A lot of breeders don't tell buyers this though. If a buyer wants two dogs 'to keep each other company' it must be hard to convince them otherwise.
Coming from one who has almost always 'run on' a couple of puppies ....... I'd suggest that occasionally, and depending on the individual buyer, it can be okay to let two litter-mates go to the same home. BUT as a general rule, we tended to advise people to have just one, get through the puppy stages, and then by the time the first is approaching a year, start thinking about getting a second. There's no doubt this breed, above most other breeds I'd suggest, tends to do better with a companion (or two, three, four - and the rest is history!:D)

On the other hand, I let two, male and female go to a fellow-breeder thinking with her kennel set-up the two together would be great. I don't think the two EVER were together from the day they left me. Even worse came later when I found out she sold them to another breeder not in the UK. A very sad lesson learnt, the hard way. Never again did I sell to another breeder.

Back to thread - I hope those two have been able to be found a foster home. But that they don't have to say in foster-care for long. If you hear more, do post!!
 

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I think the difference with "running on" littermates is that we have other dogs for them to interact and form relationships with, as opposed to a pet home where they are usually the only dogs and have no one but each other. I've had the occasional person want to buy littermates, I've always told them no.
 

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I must be missing something here. Why is having two dogs bonded a bad thing? We have had litter mates before and never had a problem? We have thought of having two next time round, seemed a good idea to us.
 

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I think the difference with "running on" littermates is that we have other dogs for them to interact and form relationships with, as opposed to a pet home where they are usually the only dogs and have no one but each other. I've had the occasional person want to buy littermates, I've always told them no.
:):):):):):), think we should ask for a thumbs up sign!!
found one.
 

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I must be missing something here. Why is having two dogs bonded a bad thing? We have had litter mates before and never had a problem? We have thought of having two next time round, seemed a good idea to us.
The problem is, it's suggested, that two going to a home together, especially a novice home, will tend to listen, look, to each other before the owner which can make training more difficult. Nothing wrong, for me, in two bonding together, as long as they don't form a mini-pack and shut the owner out. Those we ran on, initially didn't interact with the adults until they were older. It's more a no-no, I think, for the novice owner. And there's no doubt some individual time has to be factored in, so they don't become too dependent on each other.

Case in point - our last two, brother and sister, were fine, reacting with me and everybody until the time came when we sadly lost the sister. Her brother was LOST. Much as never having lived as a single hound from the moment he was born, would have meant he was bound to be upset. I didn't quite realise exactly how much he'd relied on her, and of course, the others, when it came to dealing with situations outside the home. He definitely started to adopt an 'attack is the best form of defence' attitude, hackles up and rumbling. Most un-Basset like and totally not how he'd been before.

If you'd like to consider having two next time, especially as you have other hounds too..... I see no reason why this can't work, given you are experienced too.
 

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Yes, I see that now. If you have no other dogs and have never had hounds in particular, I can see that the two together might shut you out. Hard enough getting thru to one sometimes! We also have cats who have seemed to "joined the pack" they play and sleep together....odd because no two of our animals were raised together! One cat used to even go on walks with us and the dogs...
 

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Discussion Starter #13
The BRNGB have posted a blog about these two today - Nelson and Tibbs:
Brothers in Arms: Nelson and Tibs | The Basset Rescue Network GB Ltd

No update about whether they've found a foster, but I assume they have as the blog post is seeking adoption for them. Adorable pair - funnily enough, not littermates! Nelson is 6 and Tibbs is 1.

Hope they can find a home together.
 

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Not even so much that they shut you out, sometimes they can get overly dependent on each other. I've had dogs in for grooming that fret if they're out of each other's sight. That can be a real problem if one needs to be hospitalized, if one dies, or if something happens to the owner and they need to be split up. It can happen with any two dogs but it's more common with littermates that have always been together. It's necessary to make sure each one has separate "me time" to make sure they are able to function independently.
 
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