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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hi everyone.
I am new to Bassets but have owned many dogs over the years.
I have a six month old basset Winnie, who is totally amazing and naughty. Whenever I talk to Basset owners they tell me you can't train a basset in the same way you train other dogs.
But no one actually tells you why or more importantly how!
We are still working on the house training, progress is being made and I am sure we just need to stick at it. So I am not too bothered with that.
Winnie will sit, lay down, look, and give her paw on request. It took a few minuets each to teach these with treats. Well "look" took a lot longer and we are still working on it.
My main problem is getting her to focus, she can be really wild at times. Her favourite game is stealing things to chew and making you chase her to get them back. Yes I know stop chasing her and she will stop running.... but then she destroys what she got.
I guess most of it is just puppy stuff. But can someone tell me the difference between training Bassets and other dogs !!!!!
Please.
 

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training

I've had dogs all my life, and I'm as old as dirt.

all dogs are as different as people, dog breeds do have bred in traits that you need to know. you could line up 100 dog trainers/owners and ask them this question, and you will get 100 different answers. here is my 2 cents.

train a dog/pup to respond to these 3 commands and when they have mastered them, any other training will fall into place.

NO
come to call
GOOD dog

never think you are smarter than the dog, once they master the 3, they will teach you the rest
 

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There is no difference than this Bassets are soft and sensitive in general, they do not tolerate or respond to rough handling. The use of positive punishment generally causes them to shut. down. There reputation for stubbornness arise from how they deal with stress which is to shut down and do nothing.

Any classes based on modern positive reinforcement general work well with bassets.

favourite game is stealing things to chew and making you chase her to get them back. Yes I know stop chasing her and she will stop running.... but then she destroys what she got."
She is brilliant and a typical basset and expert at manipulation and getting what she want.

1. every time she steals something beat yourself or spouse if appropriate over the head for leaving the item where she could get it. Keep in mind when it comes to dogs freedom must be earned. She should not have full run of the house if you can't trust her. she must be confined to a smaller safe area where she can still see you whether it is a baby gated safe room , crate or x-pen when you are not immediately supervising her.

2. you must teach a "give' or "drop it' command starting with low value item and slowly woring up to higher value items.

How to Teach Your Dog to Drop It: 11 Steps (with Pictures)

The Dog Trainer : Teach Your Dog to Give or Drop an Item :: Quick and Dirty Tips ?

how to teach dog drop it - Bing video

this is how I do it but with one hand on each side of toy
how to teach dog drop it - Bing video

 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thank you for your advice I will work my way through the links.
You obviously know Winnie very well, either that or she is a typical Basset. She does shut down when stressed. She hates getting her harness on getting ready for a walk and will stand like a statue, looking very sad. She likes it when she has reached the park. But hates either the walk or the car journey there. I had hoped she would have got over it by now.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
That last link was really good, I have booked marked it and will watch it again and other training sessions by her. I should have realised most of this myself. I guess years of not having a puppy dulls the brain to their behaviour. Thank you.

Do you ever use a clicker? or a dog whistle? At the moment Winnie is really good off lead in the park (she is off lead the minuet we get away from the car park)
As she gets more confident and follows her nose I am worried that she might wander off and was thinking that training her to return to a whistle might work well. What I mean is return to the treat the whistle represents. Thanks for the help it's appreciated.
 

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The main thing to remember when training Bassets is they are not the least bit interested in doing something to please you. They want to be "paid". For most Bassets that means an edible reward, but depending on the dog can also mean attention, praise, toys, games etc. Remember that it is the dog that determines what is a reward. I may think you should find paper clips rewarding, you probably want cash and won't continue to work for me if you don't get any.

Bassets are highly intelligent and can learn very quickly when properly motivated.

I do use a clicker, but it's not a "calling" device, it's a behavior marker. You use it by clicking at the exact moment the dog is doing what you want, so that he knows he has earned a reward. http://www.clickertraining.com/get-started

As far as doing recalls at the park, the secret is NOT to only do it when you're ready to leave. Call her in frequently while you're there, give her a treat and send her off again. Otherwise she learns that coming when called means the fun's over.
 

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[quoteThe main thing to remember when training Bassets is they are not the least bit interested in doing something to please you. They want to be "paid". For most Bassets that means an edible reward, but depending on the dog can also mean attention, praise, toys, games etc. Remember that it is the dog that determines what is a reward. I may think you should find paper clips rewarding, you probably want cash and won't continue to work for me if you don't get any.][/quote]

Yes I think I am getting the hang of how important rewards are. I have to sneak the treats into my pocket while she isn't looking. Training went well at class this week and we are working hard at home. Well chuffed with how I am learning !


Have to be honest I love stationary... but that's another story ;-)
 

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'Remember that it is the dog that determines what is a reward."


BUT you can change that over time. pairing a toy with food can transfer the value of the food to the toy. to learn more about transferring value dog a google search on Susan Garrett blog transferring value

just one example
Grow the Value | Susan Garrett's Dog Training Blog

some useful tools
https://www.clickerdogs.com/createamotivatingtoy.htm

not by all means comprehensive but a good start.
https://www.clickerdogs.com/listofreinforcers.htm


two areas where training fall apart is changing location and adding distraction. Dogs are poor generalizer for them train the to respond to a verbal cue like sit say in the kitchen is not the same thing as in the dining room or outside or ...
once you have the behavior reliable in one location do not expect it to be reliable everywhere unless you work and train it everywhere. Same goes for distractions,

https://www.clickerdogs.com/distractionsforyourrecall.htm

more on generalization
ClickerSolutions Training Articles -- Generalization versus Discrimination
DF-1

IT is well known like humans certain dogs learn better some ways than other. For instance one of my bassets macy was an exceptional learner by observation especial of other dogs but rather a poor learn by doing her self which is in contrast to most dogs. That said working with people in training dogs I am of the firm belief that dogs are much more flexible in how they learn than people are in how they teach effectively. When you find something that works for you in training a dog it will work for every dog you train with a few tweeks. Try another method to teach the same thing and often fails. When looking at teaching a dog there is no one wright way but a sure guarantee of failure is if you don't think it will work it is not going to. you must have some belief in the methodology for it to be successful for you
 

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"Do you ever use a clicker? "


a dog clicker is an extremely precise tool. Most of the behavior we are desiring in a dog are rather imprecise. Using a clicker on an imprecise behave devalues the clicker.

from on if the fore most authorities on using a clicker in training'
ClickerSolutions Training Treasures -- Chucking Food
In this casual speech, and this is my own term, chucking food means the deliberate (meaning premeditated) more or less PRECISION delivery of food to the animal. It is not simply feeding the animal, or throwing food (though I can see where throwing food to the dog or dolphin might be in order). The process of delivering the food would serve as a secondary reinforcer, of sorts, and of course, the process ends with the primary reinforcer. The primary purpose (there are others) of chucking food is to preserve the precision of the clicker, the single most precise (and powerful) tool in the clicker-trainer's arsenal.

...The other mis-use of the clicker is for vague or general behavior - such as "over there" or "not doing something." Now if "over there" means that as the dog's right foot plunks down past an imaginary line and you go CLICK, then that is NOT a vague behavior. If the dog can earn the click by performing a reproducible event, then that is not vague. Can animals learn vague things? Of course they can learn many vague notions, such as HANGING OUT. However, the clicker offers few advantages over just chucking food when they accomplish such tasks. Now, I understand about training at a distance, and that MAY be an exception to what I have been presenting, and there MAY be others (yes, I have used a clicker at 50 ft, just as many of you have).

Folks, all I am suggesting is that you think carefully when you plan whether or not you will click and treat or treat only. Remember that getting any one behavior is for the short-haul, and your clicker is forever. Don't needlessly hurt the power and precision of the clicker you plan to use to get the most exquisitely fine behavior possible. Remember that you DO have a choice - clicking is not mandatory, nor is it a law. Remember that there is truly a PRIMARY reinforcer as well as a secondary reinforcer. Remember that you can shape behavior with a primary reinforcer, not just a secondary. Some have asked how our company got so much precise behavior so quickly. One reason was that we planned and we used our training tools pretty well, which means we did not squander our clicker (or whistle, or electronic signal, or whatever). I suggest that you consider doing the same."

I use a clicker muck less often now then when I first started clicker training.
 

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"The main thing to remember when training Bassets is they are not the least bit interested in doing something to please you."

having worked with beagles basset in general are far more biddable then beagles but all scent hound are low on the biddable scale. and all the so called easy to train dogs are high.


Actual this has nothing to do with how hard or easy it is to tray a particular dog. Biddable dog can be trained with some old school method that simple won't work wit non biddable dogs. This in the long run says more about the training method than it does the dog.

http://suzanneclothier.com/hard-train
"In a deliciously ironic twist, our deliberate selection for certain behavioral traits in purebred dogs has led to the development of breeds who, more strenuously than others, insist on interesting, well thought out answers to the two primary life questions. For example, a Border Collie might ask "Why?" and be perfectly satisfied with an answer of "Because I told you to." Driven by a nearly insatiable desire to do anything - even busy work - a Border Collie questions no further. On the other hand, a Siberian Husky receiving such an answer might simply **** his head and gaze at his handler with barely contained amusement. (Every Siberian worth his salt knows that "Because I told you to" is not an acceptable answer.) And the dialogue begins.

Handler: You should do this because you love me.
Siberian (truthfully): Love is a feeling, not a reason.
Handler (a bit pompous): It is important that you do this.
Siberian (with great wisdom): Humans give importance to the wrong things.
Handler (growing angry): If you don't do this, I'll punish you.
Siberian (with dignity): Then I may have no choice but to comply. But I can choose not to trust or like you.
Handler (calmer, trying another approach): I'll make it fun for you.
Siberian (interested): How much fun?
Handler: So much fun that you'll beg for more!
Siberian: On that basis, I'll try it. But remember, I'm easily bored. This better be good.

Now, if the handler was trying to get this Siberian to run, the dialogue would be much different:

Handler: I want you to run like the wind.
Siberian: I'm already gone!"
 

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"As she gets more confident and follows her nose I am worried that she might wander off '


in the field bassets are much closer workers than say beagles they general do not get that far away. However if the are chasing something they should not such as deer or fox they can end up miles away. It would take signifcant recall training for to over come the distraction of deer or a fox. When doing Field trials in Non-enclosed areas we have garmin tracking collars for this reason.



 

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I also signed up for "good doggie online" it sends you an email every day with new training tips to try. Just started it but its been useful so far. might also be for older dogs.
 

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Dude, training dogs is really very difficult. This is the most complex and time-consuming process. In addition, it’s not enough to watch a video on YouTube. You must have leadership skills so be very careful when training. For a long time I tried to train my shepherd but she was very moody. In the end, I decided to find a specialist for training, but came across a review of a special program for training dogs on officiallypets.com. After reading the review, I bought it and began to train the dog exclusively on this program and progress was immediately noticeable. So I advise you to try this program!
 

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bssetthanks for your advice because it is really very difficult for me to train my dog!
this article might help. on the mind set part and how most bassets are not very biddable ie willing to please.


 
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