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This was posted on a beagle group that I belong to. Thought it was good advice.

Nice thing to know for animals.

A School Nurse has written the info below -- good enough to share
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I had a pediatrician tell me what she believes is the best way to remove a tick. This is great , because it works in those places where it's sometimes difficult to get to with tweezers: between toes, in the middle of a head full of dark hair, etc. Apply a glob of liquid soap to a cotton ball. Cover the tick with the soap-soaked cotton ball and swab it for a few seconds (15-20), the tick will come out on it's own and be stuck to the cotton ball when you lift it away. This technique has worked every time I've used it (and in KY, that was frequently), and it's much less traumatic for the patient and easier for me. Unless someone is allergic to soap, I can't see that this would be damaging in any way. I even had my doctor's wife call me for advice because she had one stuck to her back and she couldn't reach it with tweezers. She used this method and immediately called me back to say, \"It worked!\"
I need to post a caveat to my earlier post for tick removal. I have received conflicting information from another poster that makes sense to me, so I'm passing it on. "Removing ticks via the smothering method causes the tick to "throw up" into the dog's bloodstream (spreads Lime Disease and other nasty stuff to the dog). My vet and my doctors tell me to use only tweezers, and try to get the tick out with the head intact on the first try."


My apologies for posting information without researching it first.

Janet 'n Twinkie
 

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About 12 years ago during a terrible tick outbreak in Virginia, I found a great tool for removing ticks. It was called a "tick picker", or something like that, and basically it was kind of like kitchen tongs except the ends were shaped like half a spoon. They worked like scissors, so that when closed, the halves of the spoon scooped under the tick and you could pull it out without the threat of the tick spitting anything into the person/horse/dog's bloodstream. They were cheap, and I bought them at a horse tack store. I haven't seen a pair since, but if anyone finds them for sale, they are definitely worth the money.
 
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