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My husband and I got Louie a few months ago and we love him to death. He's six months old and he's such a playful, yet layed back dog. He absolutely loves other dogs and people and we were thinking of possibly getting a second Basset. If we do get another Basset we were going to apply to adopt one from the Basset Hound Rescue of Ontario. We have a small yard but it's fenced in and safe. We take Louie for a 40-60 minute walk everyday, but it just seems like he's lonely and/or bored sometimes and we were wondering if he would like a buddy.
So, before we got serious about getting another, I thought I'd poll all you multiple basset owners to find out all the Do's and Don'ts and any other tips and suggestions you found when getting another Basset. We were thinking of one a bit older. Around 2-5 years old.
Was it difficult to introduce another Basset? Did you take your current Basset to "pick out" the new member of the family? Louie is currently being crate trained. Do we need another crate? And what about feeding time - how do you manage that? Did you find they became more independant (not that I really mind all the mommy cuddles, but I'd like him to not be AS attached) once they had a buddy to play with?
We have a ton of questions, and I know that every Basset is different (like people) but if you could give us any tips or suggestions or even stories are fun too, it will really help us to decide.
Thanks so much!!
Dana
and Louie says THANKS too!!!
 

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Murray has a dachshund 'sister'; we've always had more than one dog at a time. I think most dogs like other canine companionship. And I think it helps them to be less neurotic and more 'doggie'- just my opinion.

Personally, I think each dog should have its own crate. We feed our dogs in separte locations, but lots of people feed dogs together, I think it just depends on the dogs. Introducing them in a neutral location, outside of your house, is a good idea.As far as their relationship with you after the new dog comes, I think that depends on the dog too. Murray is a big smooshy cuddler and nothing will ever change that.

Louie is a handsome guy! Good luck!
 

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My two are littermates and have been together since birth. So, there situation is different. But, I can tell you they love to play together. It really takes the pressure off of you to entertain your little guy so much. Young pups have a ton of energy and another dog is a great way for them to burn it off. Also, they play in a dog way they don't with us. My two eat from separate bowls but right next to each other.

We do have a visiting Basset often. Now, we have Wilson for a month. The visitor is always fed in another room. Just easy that way and no worries about food fights. I do however give an occassional biscuit together. I make sure I'm standing there to supervise. Toys are also up for grabs. Beds are shared too. The visitor always sleeps in a crate by her or himself.

I think a separate crate is a good idea. You sound like you are on the right track doing alot of investigation. Take your time looking for the right playmate for your boy. Good Luck!
 

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Although it's twice as dirty and twice the food and vet bills, two dogs are really only about 20% more work than one. The doggy dynamic can vary. Sometimes they become great friends, usually they establish a pecking order, and sometimes its just like having two dogs each by themselves. Unless one (or both of them) have some sort of personality/behavioral problem they should sort things out pretty quickly and then get along.
 

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Getting a second hound was the best decision I ever made. I resisted it for a long time, but finally gave in because Lightning had severe separation anxiety as a puppy. Stomps cured Lightning of his separation anxiety immediately. We had some territorial issues, and Stomps attacked Lightning a few times, but feeding them separately and establishing some rules in the house has fixed that. I never crated mine, but I would still recommend it. Going for a walk was the only time I didn't like having two bassets--Lightning likes to move quickly and Stomps likes to stop and pee every three seconds, so our walks were pure chaos. But now I have a huge fenced-in yard and dog doors, so that's not an issue anymore. I say go for it!
 

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We were thinking of one a bit older. Around 2-5 years old.
Was it difficult to introduce another Basset? Did you take your current Basset to "pick out" the new member of the family? Louie is currently being crate trained. Do we need another crate? And what about feeding time - how do you manage that? Did you find they became more independant (not that I really mind all the mommy cuddles, but I'd like him to not be AS attached) once they had a buddy to play with?
We have a ton of questions, and I know that every Basset is different (like people) but if you could give us any tips or suggestions or even stories are fun too, it will really help us to decide.
Thanks so much!!
Dana
and Louie says THANKS too!!![/b]
The rescue will check the temperment of a potential adoption first to find out if it has problems with other dogs or not. I would not take Louie to a foster home to pick out a potential companion. Such intial meetings should be doner on neutral territory where each will be equally uncomfortable and one on one meating only not Louie to a pack. The dymanics are such you will not get a good read on compatibility. All else being equal mixed sexed matches are less likely to run into sibling rivialry than same sex matchs. Females tend to be more "lively" than males at all life stages.

You will need a seperate crate for each dog. As for feeding What do you do now? Mine are not free fed, They are fed twice a day. Each has their own spot. Each must maintain a down while the meal is prepared, and the food bowl put down. Each is release seperately to go to their individual bowl. The order they are released is based on the speed which they eat. The fastest of course being the last to eat. To minimize any conflict from checking the other bowls, the dogs get desert ie. dog cookie, if they stay in front of their bowl after the meal. The cookie is put in the bowl to further reinforce the behavior. This is a breif synopsis of my procedure of course it does require some training. FWIW when Macey arrived it took 5 days to he fully catch on but she is extremely quick learner.


How strongly a dog bonds to humans vs dogs has a lot to do with its early development 4-16 weeks of age. Little effects this intial deveopment phase later in life. It can be tweeked with a lot of effort but to expect a dog that heavy needs human attention to become less dependant on it is unrealistic.

Louie however is just reaching adolescents which is marcked by a dog seeking more atonomy, finding were it fits in the world etc. you may find as he matures he needs less human reasurance. This is just natural maturation rather than becoming more dependant on another dog


Some consideration against adopting at this time, Unless Louie is fully house trained his accidents in the house can have an adverse effect on an older house trained dog. You may find yourself haveing to train two instead of just one. Adolescents has often been caracterized as the deamon seed phase. While each dog is different trying to deal with two dogs at this delvelopment stage might be more than you want to chew. Check into the developmental stages of a dog before deciding if this is the best time or if you are better of waiting another 6-8 months until Louie is more of an adult

Developmental Stages Of Puppy Behavior
6 - 18 months = Adolescence
Most influenced by human and dog “pack” members.
At seven to nine months they go through a second chewing phase -- part of exploring
territory.
Heightened exploration of dominance, including challenging humans.
If not spayed or neutered, beginnings of sexual behavior.[/b]

Puppy Adolscence - or Demon Spawn

DEVELOPMENTAL STAGES & SOCIALIZATIONWhat happens when - how your puppy changes and develops

Puppy development
Adolescence is a very difficult time for pet owners. They are surprised when their cute little puppy becomes a free and independent thinker[/b]
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks, everyone.
Louie is finally house trained and he only "piddles" in excitement now.
We weren't going to get another Basset right away. We want to take our time and figure out if it's right for US and make sure we're making the right decision.
Keep the suggestions coming...they're all fantastic!
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks, everyone.
Louie is finally house trained and he only "piddles" in excitement now.
We weren't going to get another Basset right away. We want to take our time and figure out if it's right for US and make sure we're making the right decision.
Keep the suggestions coming...they're all fantastic!
 

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Gotta tell ya. Having two Basset's is only about half the work. Rosco and Cletus are the best of friends and could never be seperated. Even if one of them is gone only for a few minutes, the other gets worried and has to look for him. I say go ahead and get another one, but be sure to treat them equal.
 

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Louie is so cute! I have three bassets and they take good care of each other. I do spend a bit more time cleaning the yard... and my routine vet visits have to be spread out... not so much for cost but because I can't get them all to the vet in one car trip :lol: But I consider them well worth the bit of extra work!
 
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