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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hi all,

It's been 7 months since Spencer made the trip to the Rainbow Bridge & I've been thinking about adding a new furbabe (or 2) to my life. I'm thinking I'd like to find a dog or possibly a pair, preferably young adults, but no more than 5 or so years old. I got both Sadie & Spencer as pups, so the rescue thing is new to me. A few questions for those of you have adopted rescues:

-Is there anything in particular to look for or avoid when considering a dog?
-If not already a pair, is it better to adopt 1 dog & add a second later, or
adopt 2 at the same time?
-So many rescued dogs have been treated for heartworm. Does this have any
lasting effects on the health of the dog?
-Any suggestions or advice for me?

I've been regularly visiting the Guardian Angel Basset Rescue & the Ohio Basset Hound Rescue websites. Does anyone know of any other rescue organizations in the Greater Cincinnati area? I should add that I would like to wait until about mid-June to actually bring any dog(s) home. I'm a teacher & think that since I am home during the summer, it would be best to wait until then, so I can be home full-time to help them adjust.

Thanks for any info/suggestions/advice. :)

Amy

I can't resist adding one of my fave pics of Spencer...
http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/5146416075/
 

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We adopted Woofus and can say that he's been a lot of work. Saying that, he was abused and had many problems that we were willing to deal with. I think you should have an idea of what you're willing to deal with (ie if you only want a really easy going dog or one you have to work with) and ask your local rescue. But my best advice...don't even try. Cause the hound will pick you :) Go to your rescue a couple of times and you'll have one that will call you their own.
 

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Wow, that is great that you are thinking of adopting... can't help you with the adoption ??s.

But wanted to say what a nice picture of Spencer that is. He has such nice features. Worm wants to know, "How did he stand that way? I can't seem to do it...???"
 

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I have three adopted hounds:)

We are in the Uk so no idea about the Heartworm issue.


Either a bonded pair or adopt separately would be fine,mine were adopted singly at different intervals.
I would not adopt two individuals at one time though I would give the first one time to settle before introducing number two.




This is my gang:D
 

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So many rescued dogs have been treated for heartworm. Does this have any
lasting effects on the health of the dog?
this is entirely variable it stongly depends on the age and health of the dog, and the extent of the of the infection. Generally a few worms is not going to cause any long term damage. if there is damage it can general be heard by a vet listening to the dogs breathing (pulminary artery is a prime spot for worms and the heart.

American Heartworm Society FAQ's




is it better to adopt 1 dog & add a second later, or
adopt 2 at the same time?
It is probably personal prefference I don't know of any studies suggestion one is better than the other but personnal I never like take two dogs at the same time. I think the potential for creating problem that are not solvable is much greater.


Any suggestions or advice for me?
Come up with a profile of what the idea dog is to you. Isd color and marking imporant, activity level, compatibility with other non-dog species i.e cats, small children. a non barker etc. an stick to ideal it is better to wait for the right dog instead of taking on the heartbreaking story and find the is not just right for your situation General dogs in rescue come with some sort of issue , the perfect dog is rare you need to decided what types of issue you can and can not handle. i.e. excessive shyness unlike a puppy an adult dog is what it is you can help somewhat around the edges but you can not mold the dog like you can a puppy so it is critical that the dog is compatible with you and your lifes style because if not the odd of making it work are slim to none.

I'm a teacher & think that since I am home during the summer, it would be best to wait until then, so I can be home full-time to help them adjust
1 would agree. it is rare that even adult dogs are truely housetrained in a new setting. They certainly learn more quickly than a puppy but it is best to assume they are not housetrain until they prove otherwise. Being home makes this sa much easier process. The only caveate is you must guard against creating a dog that is too clingy and more likely to suffer seperation anxiety when you eventual go back to working. See Seperation Anxiety

Separation anxiety is often triggered by either a high contrast situation – months of the owner home all day followed by sudden eight-hour absences – or some sort of life change – rehoming, a stay at a boarding kennel, a death of a key family member or major change in routine.


...
Puppies and newly adopted dogs are at higher risk to develop separation anxiety if they are smothered with constant attention their first few days home. It is much better to leave for brief periods extremely often so the dog’s early learning about departures is that they are no big deal and predict easy, tolerable lengths of absence: "whenever she leaves, she comes back."

 

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I have three adopted hounds:)

We are in the Uk so no idea about the Heartworm issue.


Either a bonded pair or adopt separately would be fine,mine were adopted singly at different intervals.
I would not adopt two individuals at one time though I would give the first one time to settle before introducing number two.




This is my gang:D
What nice looking hounds!!! that's so good that you took them all in, looks like they enjoy being in your gang :lol:
 

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Have you looked into Michigan Basset Rescue? Michigan Basset Rescue - Home of the Original Basset Waddle It's located in Southeastern MI and that would be about the same distance as GABR. We have three hounds, 2 rescued and one adopted as a puppy. We brought each of our rescues in one at a time so they would have time to adjust. You might let the rescue organizations around know what your looking for in case they come across dogs like your looking for (They might take them in knowing they already have a home lined up for them). If you're going to bring two dogs in at once, I would recommend a bonded pair since you won't have to worry so much about them adjusting to each other. Also talk to the people at the rescue, they would be able to give you tips on taking home two dogs, as they are constantly bringing in new dogs all the time. Good luck! And post lots of pictures when you find your hounds!!
 

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I don't have any answers for the rescue questions but I just wanted to say how great it is that you're willing to take in one or even two rescues! I think what someone said about just looking until one speaks to you is a good idea. Good luck and please post pictures of the hounds when you find them!
 

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You might want to consider Bluegrass Basset Rescue in Hopkinsville, KY which is straight down rte. 65 from Louisville, not that far from you. Bluegrass Basset Rescue has a website and is on facebook. Good luck!
 

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I adopted 3 y.o. male Basset from GABR, they are a great group but I picked the wrong dog. He was rescued from a breeder, had been treated poorly, untreated heart worm and leg fracture. He was quiet, well behaved, a good dog until he suddenly attacked my 15 y.o. granddaughter six weeks after we adopted him. He suddenly ran in from another room, chasing & biting her multiple times, did not stop until my son subdued him. This was unprovoked, shocking, still cannot figure out why it happened. I returned him to GABR, he was evaluated by a behaviorist and re-fostered, they found no aggression and put up for adoption again a few months ago.

I decided to try rescue again a few months later but through a Doberman/Rott rescue group. I went to pick up a pug and came home with a Basset. The adoption coordinator said it was a shame we had a bad Basset experience because she had the sweetest little Basset that no one wanted. She had been family raised with a 10 year old child and much loved but her owner died. She was fostered with a family, dogs, cats, and two autistic children and loved everyone. We have had Simone for 5 months now, she's 18 months old. We love her like crazy and she is the sweetest, funniest dog I've ever seen. The nice things about an older dog is half the work is already done! She sleeps through the night, crate trained, potty trained, full grown-no surprise in size.

I should have realized a breeding stud that did not even have basic health care was probably not socialized well and not a good fit for our family. I should have waited longer for the right dog. It's easy to fall in love with a dog and feel sorry for them, to want to give them love and a good home but it is important to understand their history. Good luck, rescue can turn out great if you get the right dog.
 

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should have realized a breeding stud that did not even have basic health care was probably not socialized well and not a good fit for our family.
It is also the rescues job to do the same as well. The rely on the foster homes to provide them with accurate info on the temperament of the dog but this is only as good as the situations that have been observed. i.e if the dog is not in a home with a small childeren it can not be reliably evaluated with how it is with small children. etc. Th can make assumption but assumptions are not reliable. You want to be sure the dog is or has been fostered is a similar home/lifestye situation as your own.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Wow, lots of good info & advice. Keep it coming, it's welcome.

To those of you who suggested not adding 2 individuals at once, I was thinking it would be better to do 1 at a time, unless they are already a bonded pair. I don't want to take on too much or cause any problems for the dogs.

Wworm, thanks for the compliment about Spencer. I did have to laugh at your question about "making" Spencer stand that way. I was never very successful in "making" Spencer do anything. He certainly had a mind of his own! I have a friend who told me he thought it was a good thing Spencer was so cute because it made up for his naughtiness. ;)

MikeyT, I understand what you are saying about separation anxiety & a high contrast situation. While I am home during the summer, I do go out & about, so the dog would know what it would be like to be left. I just think I could control it better in the summer - several short outings leading up to longer ones instead of leaving the dog for 8 hours right off the bat.

roscoelayalmommy & shiappab - I will look into the rescues you suggested. Both are close enough to me.

Simone's mom, what you describe is my big fear with adopting a rescue. You just never know what they have been through or what might trigger a problem. I've actually wondered about that, because I visit the GABR site often enough to have seen dogs reappear after being adopted. There is one on there now that I remember from several months ago. But, on the other hand, getting a puppy is no guarantee that you will avoid problems either. I got both Sadie & Spencer as puppies, within a little over a year of each other & I dealt with behavior problems (anxiety, fear, some aggression) with Spencer all his life. Sadie was an easy dog & did not show any problems like Spencer.

Again, thanks for all the info. :)

Amy
 

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-Is there anything in particular to look for or avoid when considering a dog?
Your #1 priority should be finding a dog that is suited for your family. This is probably the real reason for most of the returned rescues. For example my husband and I are super lazy at home and thus we adopted Anabelle who sleeps 23.9 hours a day (or at least it seems that way). We would not be able to deal with a dog that requires heavy exercise and stimulation. Our mutt is crazy and thus drives us crazy, but thankfully only when there are other people around :p
-If not already a pair, is it better to adopt 1 dog & add a second later, or adopt 2 at the same time?
If the 2 dogs are already accustomed to each other, it's best to adopt them together. If they're not, probably the opposite is true. A new house is very stressful for any dog, rescue or not, and adding another dog that is unfamiliar to them will (in my opinion) hurt the process more than it will help it.
-So many rescued dogs have been treated for heartworm. Does this have any lasting effects on the health of the dog?
Anabelle was treated for heartworms and I am not aware of any lasting health effects for her. The main problem is while they are undergoing treatment they aren't allowed to exert themselves much at all. For a younger dog this often means confining them in a crate for long periods of time. Overall though a few months after her last shot, she was back to normal.
-Any suggestions or advice for me?
Ask the rescues if there are any dogs that have been glanced over and need adoption more than others. I find it rewarding to see the good in dogs that other people have overlooked. But again make sure they're a nice fit for your family. Also these dogs are often the favorites of the rescue/shelter volunteers and they will love to hear about them later on and see how they're doing.
 

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He was quiet, well behaved, a good dog until he suddenly attacked my 15 y.o. granddaughter six weeks after we adopted him. He suddenly ran in from another room, chasing & biting her multiple times, did not stop until my son subdued him. This was unprovoked, shocking, still cannot figure out why it happened.
I heard something similar happening with a former breeder dog. It was the smell of ovulation or menstruation that set him off.
 

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I don't have any advice for you, Amy but I'm excited that you are thinking of getting another basset! I'll always remember Spencer, I loved his pictures! He shared the same birthday as my Yogi!
Good luck with your search and keep us posted.
 

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i might be related to spencer on accounta' i make up for my naughty with CUTE!
I left them the cutest present before "werk" today... a big steaming Esther boom boom pile in the den. What's the big fuss about? He got up to run (without ME??) and she kept sleeping. Sometime's a girl's just gotta GO right? And then he wouldn't talk to me while he got dressed??? Pfft. big babies.

btw spence had some C-U-T-E basset eyeliner... really brung out his eyes!
 

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I can't really offer much in the way of advice about adoption but wanted to say that I'm so glad you are thinking of welcoming a hound or two to your home. You were such a great mom to Sadie and Spencer, any hound would be lucky to be your new family member! The one thing I do agree with, is that (unless you find a bonded pair) it might best not to bring two home at the same time. We got Larsen first at almost 4 years old, and then barely a month later, 9-week-old Ninja came home. Looking back, I think we would have been wiser to give Larsen more time to really feel secure with us and his surroundings before introducing yet another change in the form of a puppy.


I heard something similar happening with a former breeder dog. It was the smell of ovulation or menstruation that set him off.
Oh my gosh, I was just mentioning something similar to someone today. Larsen is a former show dog, who was intact until a week before we got him, but was never actually bred. After he had been with us for a while, I began to realize that he acted different toward me once a month. He doesn`t come after me or anything of the sort...he just doesn't want my hormonal self getting too snuggly with him. He is very sensitive!
 

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hello

I was browsing the bassett wanted adds and came across yours. my wife and I rescued Murphy from an animal shelter in Michigan where we live. We wanted a pet that we could take with us on the road, we are over the road drivers. We both love having him with us but unfortunately, I feel that it is not working out for him. we have noticed a change in him when we are on the road compared to when we are home. He really needs a home life where he can play and run. Murphy is 2 yrs old, very smart, house broken, gets along well with other dogs, and is not a barker and not a bitter. We are not asking anything for him except that he is loved and cared for. I will send u some more pics of him if you would like. If you have any questions please ask. Thanks for your time. Chris....
 

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What kind of change does Murphy have on the road compared to at home?
 

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Amy, I don't know if I'M ready for you to get another dog. I still miss Spencer's smiling face! Oh well, I guess I'll have to put my feelings aside. I had had Lightning for 18 months when I got Stomps. For a few months they were very good together, but then Stomps decided he was in his forever home and he was going to be the boss of it. He and Lightning had a few very nasty fights before I figured out how to prevent that from happening. So I would recommend that if you get two dogs that aren't already bonded, get two at similar ages, at the same time or within just a few months of each other. Also, keep in mind that rescues' true personalities might not come out for quite a while after adoption, and how they act at the foster's might not be similar at all to how they act in a different situation. Stomps probably would have been happier being an only dog, but that didn't become evident for a long time after I got him. But overall, he and Lightning did enjoy each other's company. I think Stomps and Spencer are sniffing each other's behinds at the bridge.
 
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