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Do all bassets have the walrus feet in the front? Berkley looks like a huge ballerina because his stick straight out to the sides when he sits. Post Pictures of your dogs feet to compare with each other. Im wondering if there are any that dont stick out?
 

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Discussion Starter #4
he doesn't really sit he lays. so i got one that sorta shows them. I posted it to my page, Im not sure how to add pics to these posts..
 

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HOLY TOLEDO those ARE long ears!
Mine are shorter, but THICKER for some weird reason.
He-Human cooks a lot of pizza and said my ears are like pizza dough not rolled out thin enough. Hmpf. Glad HE'S so perfect.

Trying to understand exactly what the walrus feet thing is. Are those like bow legs or the paws that pace different direction? Known some poor houndies that had some real trouble with their legs b/c of that--they said on the rescue site that it was a problem that comes from poor breeding practices. I don't know about all that stuff. MikeyT? Is that true?

Finally I was gonna' post a new picture of MEMEMEMEME that shows my footsies but they're having trouble up at photobucket. Is it just me or is anyone else having an issue with them? Maybe it's because I paw the keyboard. HA
later tater
 

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Feet the point east west instead of north south is actual a very serious conformational fault but quite common. The common term is fiddlefront beause when you look at the whole of the legs from the chest down the outline of the leg loos sumewhat like the body of a violin/fiddle esepecial where the elbows turn in.

Keep in mind that the feet do not sliply point out they point out because the elbow is routated in an tucked under the chest force the feet to turn out. The coformational adnormality actual occurs in the forarms elbo and shoulders it just manifest itself at the feet. Most of the time it has no adverse effect on the dog but in some rare cases it can increase arthitis risk. ANd in even rare insidence in which angular limb diformity is the culprit ( on bone grows too long/short0 surgery may be the only option to alieve pain and future problems.

That said in a vary limited sample size the more fiddlefronted the dog the better agility dog it was for me I have read that for many/ most dogs when that have this when they run and the front legs need not support as much load the feet point straight ahead again. This becomes a very good indication when it occurs that the dog will not have any problem cause by being fiddle fronted.





it was a problem that comes from poor breeding practices.
It certainly does not help but even good breeder can throw a fiddle fronted dog on occassion. Proper basset fronts are very difficult to maintain because it is polymorphic (many genes) invovolve so if for instance breeder from two different lines where to breed a pair even though both lines are known for producing good front the combination of the two might produce very poor result because it is not just have the Right gene it is the right combination of genes and it is not singular in nature. there are multiple combination when right will produce a symetrical front It is why line breeding is prevelent. moving outside the line can produce devestating effect on the frons So poor breed is part of the problem but also one can not discount that dwarfism that cause the baset bassic shape does not produce consistent results and effects on all the bones hence this is one area that bassets because of their unique genetic are more natural variable than other breeds.
 

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Sadie had nice straight legs:



but Spencer didn't:



When he was a pup, the vet said he would be more prone to arthritis, but Spencer lived to be 14 years old, and never had arthritis in his legs. He was rather clumsy though, and would trip & sometimes even fall over his feet.
 

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Here are Larsen and Ninja's legs:


Ninja's look a bit turned out sometimes, but not very much. Larsen's are really straight. When he walks, his gigantic paws point perfectly forward!
 

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Hmmm... is it possible for the legs to be straight when they're born, and then become more and more turned out? I fear that's what might be happening to Worm. His feet look more turned out now than they did couple months ago... is that a bad thing?

ps. ("i'd like to check out your legs, Esther, so I hope you can figure out how to post soon." admiringly yours, Worm)
 

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Both of mine have walrus feet. Sometimes it is really obvious. Harley is only 1/4 basset at best so I'm not sure if he gets it from that or something else. The vet calls them ballerina feet.
 

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is it possible for the legs to be straight when they're born, and then become more and more turned out?
most definately there are two major posipilities for this.

1. andgular limb diformity this happens when in what is the forarm in humans which has two bones and one of the bones either grows faster or the other stops growing, this put pressure on the elbow (ELBOW INCONGRUITY/ELBOW DISPLASIA) and the legs turn as a result. Keep in mind give the dwarism nature of basset some inconguity is enevitable and it rarely requires corective action. Toughy who had realative straight front. when being examined for pano turned out to have an elbow incongruity of 6 MM that is one bone was 6mm longer than it should have been if ideal. Thew vet familair with basset said he has seen up to 12 mm without causing a problem., So the incongruity if it exist must be sever befor taking and radical steps. The cause for such incongruities can range from normal developmental abnormalities of being a dwarf to a traumatic injury to a growth plate.

The other reason elbow turn in is to suport the weight of the front end. turning in of the elbows puts the legs more under the chest. This occurs when the conformation is not correct in the shoulder area. As the puppy gets bigger it has more weight to support hence the increasing nature of the elbow turm. THis is one area that weight management may and emphysis on may help. That is the growth of the skelatal structure can not be sped up. but over nutrition. haveing the dog grow too fast puts extra load on an inadequite bone structure leading/contributing to problems. It has clearly been demonstrated in labs that hip dysplasia can be dramatical curtailed in dogs genetical predisposed to it by manange their weight during puppyhood I believe the same is likely true of basset front ends as well. but have no actual proof.
 

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If find the term walrus feet a little disconcerting because I have applied "walrus" to an entirely different behavior.

When Toughy and my fathers dog cory were still alive and living together every morning they after breakfast they would engage in what I called Walrus Wrestling. They would sit face to face. each sitting on a flant with there feet/legs out to one side like a tail flipper A d the would bark and spar with their mouths/head only never moving any otherbody part much as you see bull walrus fight over mates and territory. an't get much lazier when it comes to play!
 

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And I noticed that there are a wide range of front paw size too...Woody's front paws are very large....is this a desirable trait or one that just his mommy loves...

And Worm, I agree with you...Esther is beautiful....I would like to see those "gams" myself...

Woody Hayes
 

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Bowser's feet

Bowser has one leg that is greater (by almost an inch) in circumference than the other. Looking right now through his old pics i think it's obvious it didn't start off like that. He was alternately limping on one then the other and finally it settled into the one leg which is now turned out more and smaller than the other. He babies it a lot too, not always putting weight on it, and sitting or standing with it lifted slightly. He's been on adequan shots (which did seem to help, but i'm kind of afraid to keep him on because i worry about something that causes cartilage regrowth also causing cancer) which stopped the limping, but like i said he still babies it.
Going with the theory that as they grow they become heavier (obviously) but that causes more stress and growth issues on the front legs...i do believe the severity of his issues are our fault, seeing as we encouraged, in the beginning, the use of stairs as exercise for him as he was growing.
We just didn't know that could hurt him, which is kind of annoying seeing as we did almost a year's worth of research on either getting a basset or a saluki and nothing EVER said the stress on his legs could cause this.

Anyway, we give him walks and minimize the stairs and since the shots he' stopped the limp, but my little man has turned out feet/elbows and always sits with the one foot off the ground : (

At least the pink bunny slippers didn't do it to him.... : )
 

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Both of mine have it, Ella's were really straight when she was little but have now turned out a bit. Ringo's are pretty bad, he has the big knuckled joints too.







Here is Ella as a pup with really straight feet.
 

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I am not quite sure how to up load a pict. but here is one of Woody as puppy..I realized I don't have too many of him with his feet on the ground...he's usually sleeping or being held..can you say "spoiled baby".?.
 
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