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Discussion Starter #1
Hello!
I posted the other day about my shedding Basset, wondering if it was due to food change, surgery (spay) or what not. I have now noticed some spots of dullness in her coat and when I tried to look at the skin the fur just comes out in clumps. When I can finally get through to see the skin it is heavily coated in what I would call dandruff. Any thoughts?
She has an appointment at the vet on Tuesday for a different matter (shots) and I will certainly bring this to their attention.
I have only bathed her with the shampoo that the vet gave me, and the only one I have ever used for our lab and cocker. I seem to recall our cocker having many skin issues, but as she was a family dog (ie: my parents responsibility) I am not sure of the causes or cures.
Thank you for any thoughts, insight or tips!
 

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When I can finally get through to see the skin it is heavily coated in what I would call dandruff. Any thoughts?[/b]
With the following caveates, when it comes to skin problems in dogs most general practice vet are not equipt to make a differental diagnoses as to what is a primary or a secondary cause of problem. In many if not most skin conditions treating symptoms is not curative only until the primary cause is found and controlled is a moderate chance of longer control and success possible. So I always recommend getting a referral to a vet that specialze in dermatology

find a dermatologist

While not the only cause of dandruff, but a very prevelent in basset hound, is a skin condition known as seborrhea
Primary seborrhea is an inherited disorder of the skin in which the outer layer of the skin (the epidermis), the sebaceous glands, and part of the hair follicles are hyperproductive. The rate of cell turnover in these tissues is significantly increased, causing excessive production of scale (dry flakes of skin) and sebum (fatty lubricating substance). Seborrhea oleosa is the more greasy form while seborrhea sicca is a dryer form. Many dogs have a combination of both types. Chronic waxy ear infections (otitis externa) also occur commonly as part of this disorder.

...Primary seborrhea is probably inherited as an autosomal recessive trait in the West Highland white terrier, and this may also be true in other breeds. This means there can be affected puppies in a litter where both parents have normal skin but carry the gene for seborrhea. Autosomal dominant inheritance with variable expressivity may be the mode of inheritance in some breeds.

...Primary seborrhea is most commonly seen in the American cocker spaniel, West Highland white terrier, English springer spaniel, and Basset hound. It is also seen in the Irish setter, German shepherd, dachshund, Doberman pinscher, Chinese Shar-pei, and Labrador retriever[/b]
If seborrhea is the cause you should let the breeder know because it is likely a genetic cause. Some other info. Seborrhea can not be cured only controled. It is the only time frequent bathing is recommend for bassets. It can be kep under control by shampoo therapy Secondary yeast infection are common with Seborrhea. Yeast infections are often the cause of hound dog funk, a rancid oil smell often referred to the dog smelling like corn chips. Especially if the odor return in days after bathing.

Seborrhea in Dogs

MALESSEZIA DERMATITIS

While degreasing shampoos such as the benzoyl peroxide (oxydex®,
pyoben®) and sulfur/salicylate (sebolyte®, sebolux®) shampoos will help remove the skin oils feeding the yeast, there are shampoos that are specifically anti-yeast. We prefer the 4% Chlorhexidine shampoo called Chlorhexiderm Max as it both strips skin oil and kills yeast; however, other anti-yeast products include Selsun Blue, Miconazole shampoo, Nizoral shampoo, and more. The pet must be bathed twice a week to start and the shampoo requires a 15 minute contact time (meaning do not rinse the lather for 15 minutes).[/b]
I know many that have had good luck with selsun blue.
 

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Wow!
Thank you for that great information!
She is losing all her fur in that patch. Is that common with it?
I will go peruse and read and talk to the vet tomorrow!
 

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Wow!
Thank you for that great information!
She is losing all her fur in that patch. Is that common with it?
I will go peruse and read and talk to the vet tomorrow![/b]
Purly speculation but I think she is just blowing her coat and the lose of under coat is what is up but it is possible the two are tied together and symptoms of the same underling condition. It is not a bad idea to consult your vet. with the one caveate I have with all general practice vets and skin condition. In general they are not very good at it. It is often cheaper and faster in the long run to consult with a specialist in the field of dematiology

Find Dermatologist
 

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So, brought her to the vet today, but no sign of the dandruff!!??!!
I guess the bath and all the brusing got rid of most of it? The vet could see her balding spot and said there is nothing to treat... It isn't uncommon for them to change colors either apparently... She is getting more and more black the more I brush her!!

On another note: She didn't have her usual appetite yesterday but did eat. Then last night she was really restless. She didn't eat anything this morning. Luckily I was bringing her to the vet anyways. They had a look and did a couple of tests, but haven't found anything wrong yet. No sign of vomiting or diarrhea yet either. I just hope she will be ok. I kind of forgot how much stuff can go wrong with dogs... sigh... another worry!!!

Thanks for the info!!
 
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