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I`ve been rereading this book during our latest cold spell.This caught my eye...
A comment Patricia makes in closing her kennel story should be of interest and value to our readers.She notes:"I believe they showed them heavier then(in the old dogs` day)than they do now,and feel that the Bassets today have improved in length of neck,(perhaps because we are keeping weight off)and heads are better,but there is lack of bone today.
Do you think since 1985(when the book was published)that the breed has gotten heavier boned?
 

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I think it comes and goes, also depends on what region of the country you are in. I know that with my last litter, a lot of the interest I got was from people looking for more bone. I've seen some nicely boned hounds in the ring, but still a lot of the racier ones too. Someone mentioned to me that it seems that when you get a hound with lots of bone, you usually lose the good shoulders and movement. It's a delicate balancing act between keeping the heavy bone while still maintaining a hound that can move out and have endurance.
 

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I just love this book and have enjoyed rereading it so much,the pictures and kennel history`s I find so interesting.I had to bring it up as a topic to let others on the Forum know about this Basset hound book.
 

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Ther are some who think the streamline basset is proper but the standard says," The Basset is......heavier in bone,size considered,than any other breed of dog." I love the heavy bone,this breed is not meant to look like string beans. Interpretations of the Standard vary,by Breeder and by Judge.
 

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This dog,Bubba is two years old in this photo,he was 70lbs,he was "heavy in bone". His shoulders were as they should be,his movement ,very sound, and beautiful. Maybe he was more the exception than the rule. He was a striking boy when he moved around the ring.
 
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I love this breed of dog, no matter what "type" they are, but for me, the heavy boned, flappy-skinned dog will always be representative of the breed.

Janet 'n Twinkie
 

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I think a key phrase is "size considered". A 70 lb basset should not have bone like a 200 lb St. Bernard, but he should have heavier bone than any other breed at 70 lbs.
 

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It's about balance. Breed too much for movement and you lose type. Breed too much for type and you get a dog that can't get out of its own way.
 

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Yes Betsy and Miriam ,you are both quite right. My Bubby had it all ,at least most of IT,he just didn't have enough time to show it off.
 

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Interesting - I look at the TallyHo and some other magazines, and I was thinking that perhaps some of the hounds looked TOO short. I know they are supposed to be short, but some of them look as if movement through any type of terrain that wasn't totally flat would be a problem. I'm not avocating tall hounds, by any means, but perhaps an inch taller?? What do you think?
 
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