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Saturday was a beautiful day so I chained Snickers up so she could romp in the front yard and she was having a lot of fun chewing my shrubs, chewing a newspaper, staring at birds, and jumping around in the snow. Saturday is also "puppy training" day so I took her to play with the other dogs. While I was the pet store I bought her some Happy Hips Sweet Potato chews and Zuke's Cranberry bone. The whole day went like an ordinary Saturday...she played with the others dogs, I gave her a sweet potato chew and her new bone when we got home, and she was so tired that she skipped dinner. She liked the sweet potato chew, but only chewed her bone for about 5 minutes.

Later that evening all was normal...she was curled up next to me on the sofa and was sleeping for several hours. We went to bed around midnight and that was it all went downhill.

She was tossing and turning in her crate, like she couldn't get comfortable, and started to whine. I took her outside and she peed. We went back to bed, but she kept whining. I decided to put her in bed with me and happily jumped up and laid down...but shortly after she continued to toss and turn. She jumped down, walked around, whined a little more, and then threw up. I got up and cleaned the mess and gave her some ice water. She drank a decent amount. I took her to the family room and she kept pacing and whining and then threw up 2 more times.

At this point I'm fearing bloat or torsion so I put her on the sofa and feel her belly...I didn't feel anything hard. I petted her a little bit and she continued to pace. I took her outside and she peed, pooped, and threw up again! :( When we came in she laid down on one of her beds and tried to go to sleep. She seemed to be comfortable and I was calling all of the emergency clinic finding out locations, directions, symptoms to look for, etc. After she seemed ok for about 20 minutes she woke up, stood up, and threw up 3 more times! :(:(:( Her last throw up was pretty clear and I was like "ok, that's it, we're going!". I felt her belly and it was still soft. She laid back down, quickly went to sleep, and was fine. I gave her a little food when she woke up and she kept that down, her energy returned (went for 2 walks and she was running), and had no other issues.

I'm thinking she ate something outside, but I'm not sure. I was also wondering if her new treats could have caused her sickness. I also read that Basset's can get bloat.

Anyone have any ideas about what caused her sickness? And how to prevent bloat?
 

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I would continue to watch her. I don't know the size of the Sweet Potato chew, but Bassets can swallow large chunks of rawhide chews than can become lodged in the intestines and cause blockages. We never let Bogie have rawhides anymore, since I have reached down his throat more than once to retreive a large slimy piece that was about to slide down his throat. They have very powerful jaws and can bite off large chunks of things and swallow them down whith out chewing them up.
I do hope Snickers will be OK and not have any more problems.
 

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Years ago Murray had a blockage from eating a Greenie. He was doing some of the things you're describing. I took him to the vet, they x-rayed him and said if he didn't pass it by morning they would have to remove it surgically. Luckily he passed it.

I'm not familiar with the treats you gave Snickers; is it possible she was having a problem like Murray had with the Greenie?

I'm glad she's better now.
 

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And how to prevent bloat?
Virtually impossible the only know sure fire way is having the stomac tacked to prevent it from rotating. This is common in some lines of Great danes at the time of spay and nueter but they have an effected rate nearing 25% basset are much less prone to it. Certain assumption made about bloat that have not been born out in studies are still recomended even though they are not effective.

such as waiting after meals for exercise, feed 2 or three meals, raising the feed water bowl, the later is actual shown to increase bloat risk. While feeding more meals isshown to reduce bloat risk smaller meals are, als a dog with a calm personality, ie not stressed, percetion of the dog being stressed is associated with boat, Easting fast increase bloat risk, along with age the older the dog the higher the risk. Bloat in puppies is exceedingly rare.


Canine Bloat Prevention and Gastropexy Surgery

Breeds that are susceptible to GDV and should be considered for the preventative procedure

Great Danes
Irish Wolf Hounds
German Shepherds
Standard Poodles
Blood Hounds
 

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As mention above it is one reason puppies especialy need to be supervised with new chew items. What is strong and large enough for one is not going to be for another, This sizing is only a guide line an aggresive chewer is going to require a stronger and larger chew than one that is not aggressive, The nature of the dogs chewing style is more important than the actual size of dog in choosing an appropriate chew.

There are no 100% safe chews.
 

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I would definitely be suspicious of the treats she had that day but having said that, there is no way to be sure. I wouldn't give any of those treats just to be on the safe side.
In so far as bloat is concerned, I have become convinced that it is largely a genetic thing. Yogi has bloated without the torsion and spent the night at the Emergency Vet having a tube passed to release the gas, very scary stuff indeed! We also have a GSD that has problems with bloat. While these things may not prevent bloat from happening to our boys we do the following for them. No heavy exercise before or after meals, no water for one hour after meals and they eat three times a day. Our vet has suggested giving Mylanta with each meal but our dogs are unable to tolerate that on a daily basis without getting diarrhea. We do keep Mylanta on hand at all times so that at the first sign of bloating we can give them that to help reduce the gas.
The most important thing with bloat is to recognize the symptoms and to get your dog to the vet as soon as possible. Also, know your dog and what is normal behavior for him/her.
Hope Snickers is doing well.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
She is back to her normal self!

Sunday was a day for rest and after the morning bouts of vomiting she had no trouble keeping food down, drinking water, and had a bunch of energy.

Monday I gave her the bone and she was fine. She went to town on it and had no adverse reactions to it.

Tuesday I gave her another sweet potato chew and she had no trouble with that either. I really want to be able to give her these sweet potato chews because are made for healthy joints and hips.

My best guess right now is that she either ate something outside or I cut up the soft dog food in too small of pieces...when I looked at her vomit it didn't look like she chewed the soft dog food at all. I now cut them a little bigger so she chews them a bit before swallowing. So far so good!

I'll get some mylanta in case of emergencies...good idea!
 
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