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Took Daisy to vet today for checkup and shots. She is about 18 months old. We were fostering her but she was hard to place so we adopted her last December. She had severe hip dysplasia and today the vet told us both back knees are very loose. The only thing we know about her past was a girl bought one of her siblings and the breeder was going to put Daisy down because of her hip. The girl ended up talking the breeder into giving her Daisy but then she was crated probably 20 plus hours per day. She is taking glucosamine daily. Are there any exercises that would help or is surgery in the future her only option.
 

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My cockapoo Zoey had displaysia. She was slowing down over time, which we attributed to age, and then one day she could barely walk. I took her to the vet and we confirmed that it was in fact displaysia. Long story short, she ended up on Deramaxx for pain and Adequan for her joints (basically glucosamine). The Adequan was a monthly injection (I did it myself), though it was front loaded and she was getting more shots initially to get it into her system. She passed away a year ago today, but it was unrelated to her meds or displaysia. She actually had a stroke. But before she died, she was back to walking, running, and doing stairs like a normal dog.

Long term, my vet explained that there is a stem cell transplant that was showing good results on displaysia dogs, but we weren't at the point that she needed that yet.

As for exercise, I don't know specific exercises for displaysia, but I'd say limited activity dictated by what the dog is able to handle is appropriate. A walk in the park or around the block is fine, if the dog can take it and not be suffering in pain after you are home.

My point is that displaysia is by no means an automatic death sentence. Usually it deteriorates to the point that the dog's quality of life is no longer there. But until you reach that point, there are things you can do that make the dog pain-free and active.

Cute girl...and I am so glad she's with you - someone who is smart enough to know that there are things that can be done for her. Good luck!
 

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My first basset back in the 80's had it. He got around pretty good. He was my Houdini dog. He had to have more uppsies than other dogs, and got grouchy when he was in pain, but had a long healthy life.
 

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Thanks for the info. I guess I meant exercises for her knees. The doc said they needed to tighten up.
 

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Petella luxation is a fairly common problem in bassets It is not simply a matter of tighening the petella tendon and surounding mucularture. I know at least on basset competeing in agility that had both knees surgugically repare and went back on to compete very successful, IMHO it os more an orthopeadic condition that exercise etc are not going to help. It comes down to the the degree of luxation and the problems it cause. FWIW the classic symptom is a dog when running around sundly yelps in pain and limp, holds upt the leg etc for 5-15 minutes and then everting is ok again.

Of course it is an assumtion On my part that "loose knee" is discribing a knee cap that pops out of place. There or other ways a knee could be loose. Again given the the knee struckure these again general do not get better only worse like CCL(acl in human term) tear or rupture etc.

Most basset have terrible rear end awareness that is the rear end does not work independantly of the front it follow along for the ride. Teaching rear end awareness and some rear end exercises can help develop rear end muscularture, I just don't think it will prevent surgery/ As an example of what is possible Mariah was diagonesed as being mildly dysplastic. She had adnormal rear end developemed in the sense the dysplastic hip atually had twice if not more muscularture than the good hip. it was very obvious. Through chiropractic care she begain developing symetry and excersise that emphysized the rear end a lot of it being jumping , which may not be recomend given the knee problems, she now ways six lbs more then when we got het all of muscle in the rear end. Her but is equally as big as the front which is very unusual in a basset, but it is a reason she can jump on the table from a stand still as well.

very common rear end awareness exercise is a old circus elephant trick of pivoting around a "pedestal". other include walk between the rungs of a ladder laying on the ground. the trick is the exercise must be performed at a dogs walking pace meaning only one leg off the ground at a time not a trot which is a more typical basset pace. At the faster pace with more feet of the ground at a time the task is much easier.. backing up in a striaght line. backing up through a ladder. etc



Rear End Awareness

Teaching Rear End Awareness

teaching rear end awarness

Keep in mind most of these exercise are taught through a process called shaping. If you have never taught a dog via this method I would highly recommend taking a shaping class first befor attempting. It is likely to be a fustrating experience otherwise.


as for exerciese for the rear end beside teaching prober jumping tecnique som other are walking/climbing hills. Hills put more load on the rear end.


Strength exercise for Agility part 1


Part 2

FitPAWS Egg Balls

Sometimes referred to theraballs, balance balls, fitness balls, gymnastics balls, or Swiss balls, exercise balls are a great tool for working on core strengthening for canines and humans alike.
some of the exercises in the links above require or a easier to perform with on of thes balls.


Get on the Ball Two DVD

Strengthening the Performance Dog DVD


With the increase in participation of dog sports there is an increase in the number of people that make their living in Physical Therapy for dogs, You may want to consult with your vet to see if there is some one in your area he would recommend.,
 

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I love that, "rear end awareness." I've often thought their back ends are like those long fire trucks that have to have a driver for the back end. They need a little chihuahua sitting on their butts helping them navigate their back sides.
 

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I love that, "rear end awareness." I've often thought their back ends are like those long fire trucks that have to have a driver for the back end. They need a little chihuahua sitting on their butts helping them navigate their back sides.
Unless they're afraid of chihuahuas. Molly finds them rather unnerving :)
 
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