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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hi All. It's been a while, although I have been lurking. Charlie is behaving strangely at the moment, I will give you a brief history. Charlie had a cyst between his toes and despite antibiotics it returned, he had an op on the 7th April to remove it and clean the area, the pus was also cultured to make sure he was on the correct antibiotics.

We noticed he was licking the area again on Friday, but he was also trying to escape from the house, pacing and drooling heavily. Another trip to the vets showed that the wound was now open, so painkillers, antibiotics and hibiscrub given. He is still trying to escape, drooling constantly, we don't know whether it's because he is still in pain or if there is a bitch in heat nearby. He is humping our other dog ( a male cocker spaniel) and trying to get out of the house and the garden. Is it down to him being in pain or feeling frustrated. Any suggestions would be great, we just don't know what to do for the best.

He is also refusing food and treats and will only be tempted by fish and chicken. He has never refused food before.
 

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Interdigital cysts and their God-forsaken therapies | petMD

See link above- did your vet label it as an interdigital cyst? My last basset Murray had one that kept returning for the last 2 years of his life, even after surgery. They are a curse, very painful for the dog too. I soaked his foot 3 times daily until the day he died, and he was on several different antibiotics off and on over the time he had it.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for your reply. I'm worried that we may have made the situation worse by opting for the op. The vet wanted to open the cyst up and drain it and check for foreign objects, so it made sense to go ahead, but it seems that wouldn't really help Charlie. I am really hoping that the wound has just opened up and the antibiotics do the job, but I'm not holding my breath. It's so frustrating, because we are doing everything we can to get rid of it, but nothing has worked so far. I did wonder if it had something to do with Charlie's wonky front end. His feet when sitting turn out, so could this cause rubbing and therefore the cysts?

He has only had maybe 4 weeks relief from this in 3 months. It's upsetting that we can't get rid of it.
 

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Thanks for your reply. I'm worried that we may have made the situation worse by opting for the op. The vet wanted to open the cyst up and drain it and check for foreign objects, so it made sense to go ahead, but it seems that wouldn't really help Charlie. I am really hoping that the wound has just opened up and the antibiotics do the job, but I'm not holding my breath. It's so frustrating, because we are doing everything we can to get rid of it, but nothing has worked so far. I did wonder if it had something to do with Charlie's wonky front end. His feet when sitting turn out, so could this cause rubbing and therefore the cysts?

He has only had maybe 4 weeks relief from this in 3 months. It's upsetting that we can't get rid of it.
Our vet thought Murray's repeated interdigital cysts were caused by ingrown hairs which were acting as foreign objects. It became a chronic situation with Murray, which I just dealt with symptomatically for the last 2 years of his life, with foot soaks and antibiotics at times. We had surgery to remove the cyst because we were desperate at that point, but the cysts kept coming back. Talk to your vet, and maybe you can also touch base with other people on this forum who have dealt with this with better results than we had.

I also should add that the foot soaks became something Murray looked forward to. He would lie on his platform bed and drop his foot over the edge. I would sit next to him and hold his foot in the warm water for 15 minutes and he would doze while I read a book. So it just became part of daily life and something we did together, not a great situation but we made the best of it.
 

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fwiw if he is an intact male all the symptoms humping trying to escape, not eating are classic when a Bitch is in heat.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I think maybe it was a combination of his wound and him pining because a bitch was in heat. It looks like our neighbours have just got a young female Labrador so I think she may be the object of his affections! He has calmed down considerably today, so hoping we are over the worst. His wound looks much better so fingers crossed it stays that way.
 

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So this doesn't happen every time she's in season, perhaps you can have a quiet talk with your next-door neighbours re the merits of SPAYING :p
 

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Discussion Starter #8
To be fair to our neighbours, it's probably our fault that Charlie is behaving that way. He is entire, it may well be if it happens again and he becomes distressed again we will have to have him castrated. We didn't want to rush in to doing this as I've heard it's better to wait until they are fully mature and also until recently he has never become this unhappy. He humps poor Tommy and is a pain on his walks, but nothing to the degree we saw over the weekend. It's not something we want to do, but if it will stop him becoming so agitated it may be necessary. We have even considered chemical castration first to see if it helps, before we opt for drastic and permanent solution.
 

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To be fair to our neighbours, it's probably our fault that Charlie is behaving that way. He is entire, it may well be if it happens again and he becomes distressed again we will have to have him castrated. We didn't want to rush in to doing this as I've heard it's better to wait until they are fully mature and also until recently he has never become this unhappy. He humps poor Tommy and is a pain on his walks, but nothing to the degree we saw over the weekend. It's not something we want to do, but if it will stop him becoming so agitated it may be necessary. We have even considered chemical castration first to see if it helps, before we opt for drastic and permanent solution.
Just know that even if castrated, a male will still be turned on - he just can't sire litters. Also I have had to have a couple of my older males castrated for medical need over the years, and on each occasion I regretted having to have it done - this is a gentle breed without the need to be castrated and mine went very 'soft', lost their zip, tended to put on weight unless watched, and grew heavier coats. Hopefully these people will have their bitch spayed rather than you having to get him castrated!! Chemical castration might, however, be an option. Just don't expect miracles. :(
 
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