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I'll try not to make this too long. This morning, Spencer had a seizure. I was up & about, but he had not been out of bed yet. I walked in the room & I noticed his head twitching & he had a look in his eyes like he wasn't there. I started petting & talking to him & within a minute, he was in a full seizure - convulsing, head back, tongue out, eyes rolling & he lost control of his bladder. Of course I'm about to lose it. Luckily my sister was next door at my Mom's & I had a phone handy so I called her to come over. The convulsing lasted not more than a couple minutes & then he was out of it for maybe 10 minutes. That time was almost scarier than the actual seizure. He seemed partially paralyzed and his eyes were HUGE & he just stared, obviously not aware of anything. We kept talking to him & petting him & all of a sudden he focused on me, started wagging his tail, got up & started running around the house like a maniac. I called the vet & they had me bring him in. They examined him & drew blood (results due Monday) & told me what I described was actually minor & very typical. They said the wild behavior after the seizure was normal & could last up to a couple hours. It was 4 hours before he calmed down. Since then, he seems ok. I expected him to be exhausted, but he hasn't been. He drank alot of water today & seemed hungrier than usual, which they told me to expect. They gave me all the possibilities of what it could be, but cautioned that it is often difficult to pinpoint the cause & until the bloodwork comes back, I should just watch him. They said if the blood work is normal, they would likely just "wait & see," because treatment is not usually undertaken unless the seizures become frequent or long in duration. I've done a lot of reading & everything they said is in line with what I've read, but now I feel like a first time mama with a brand new baby - I don't want to let him out of my sight. Any one have experience with this?
 

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My Artie age 10 started having seizures in September 2007. After the first one, the vet kept him a day and did bloodwork, ultrasound of his liver and chest and ekg. When everything came back fine, they had me bring him again for a bile acids test. Basically, they draw blood before the dog eats, then again after he eats and compare the results. This test also showed nothing abnormal. Two months went by before another seizure, and the vet thought it best to continue to watch and wait. Three more months before the next seizure occurred, at which time Artie was prescribed phenobarbital. That was last February 21. He has been seizure free since then and his liver shows no signs of damage from the meds. The side effects he did experience only lasted about 2 weeks and included sedation, hunger, and lots of whining.The vet has said that if seizures should return/worsen, we might need to investigate the possibility of a brain tumor, but Artie seems no worse for the wear and continues to terrorize the entire household as he sees fit.

I know how scary it is to watch the seizure, and there's not much you can do besides make sure they don't hurt themselves until they snap out of it. I hope Spencer feels better and doesn't have to go through another one.
 

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Murray had one seizure 2 years ago when he was about 4 , and never had another one.

Let us know how it goes- I hope it turns out to be a once and done episode like Murray.
 

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Last Christmas break (not the one that just passed) my boy Gibbs had a seizure. Though not as extreme as Spencer's. I too was absolutely freaking out (which I'm sure only worsened the situation). All tests the doctors ran came back fine. He hasn't had another one since. The vet I went to had a dog that used to seizure, so I was lucky in that she was familiar with the situation. Hopefully this will be a 1 time thing for Spencer. Let us know how it goes.

~Heather
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks finnn, muraysmom and 2 hounds for your comments and good wishes. I talked to Spencer's vet today, and she said his blood test looked good. The only thing out of whack was an enzyme that is secreted by the muscles, but she thought that was due to the seizure & the fact that the muscles were contracting violently. She said for now the recommendation was to just watch him & see if he has another seizure. Since Saturday, he has been doing ok. All day Saturday he was a little off, but seemed normal yesterday & today. The neighbor who lets him out daily came over twice today to make sure he was ok, and he got to spend a few hours outside since the weather was very mild. We had a walk this afternoon, some play time in the yard & he is now sleeping peacefully.
 

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That's good to hear. I know it's scary, but I'm glad things look good so far.

~Heather
 

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So glad to hear he's doing OK now. Hopefully that was his first and last seizure. Stay healthy, Spencer!
 

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So glad to hear he's doing OK now. Hopefully that was his first and last seizure. Stay healthy, Spencer![/b]

One siezure is not atypical in a life time.

FWIW
The epiletic dog I had the post ictal phase lasted 24 hours and was marked not by manic activity by rather a lack of any. Neither is a typical each dog usually has there own pattern. I think the first siezure is hardest on the dog and owner because they don't understand what is happening. You may want to discuss with your vet a perscription for (valium) to be adminstered rectally in the case of an emergency. custer or status sizure (siezure lasting 10 minute or more) can kill. Just because the dog never had one before does not mean it won't

EMERGENCY CARE FOR CANINE SEIZURES
 

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My late cocker had occasional seizures that were never treated. My vet said basically that same thing your vet did, that unless the seizures were frequent and violent, they don't give meds for them. Molly would seize, we'd stay with her through it, she'd bounce up when it was over and greet us like we'd been gone for six months, and life would go on. She lived til the age of 13 with no other issues.....
 

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I am experiencing the seizure situation with my basset Sadie. She started having them about a month ago and its horrible to see! They are starting to occur daily now. Our vet cant get her in until Oct 7th, so im curious about how serious this is? Am I too worried about it because they certainly dont seem to be. But after her seizure, she seems confused at first and eventually snaps back to her old self again. She goes for the food dish or the bathtub for a drink, a bad habit we started, lol. She is pushing 12 years old so I didnt know if this was something to expect with age for a basset or if there could be an underlying problem making the seizures take place.
 

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seizure situation with my basset Sadie.
give the age of the dog do you know the difference between a siezure and a tremor.





She is pushing 12 years old
This makes idopathic (unknown cause) epilesy unlike so there is an underlying casue for the siezure, be it chemical or neurological.


They are starting to occur daily now.
This is a very bigg concern because each siezure loweres the threshold for the next. So the more frequent the siezures the more frequent they become. What vets consider controled is up for debate ussual between 1 anonth to 1 every 3-6 month obvious once a day is not under control

CANINE SEIZURES - OVERVIEW,
CAUSES AND TREATMENTS

Most dogs with idiopathic epilepsy suffer their first seizure between the ages of one and five years of age. A genetic basis for idiopathic epilepsy is strongly suspected in several breeds including the Beagle, Belgian Tervuren, Keeshond, Dachshund, British Alsatian, Labrador Retriever, Golden Retriever and Collie. Idiopathic canine epilepsy may have an inherited basis in other breeds also.


POSSIBLE CAUSES OF SEIZURES BY AGE
 

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Awww, i started reading this thread thinking that Spencer just had a seizure. then i realized that's a picture of Clifford.

and those videos are so hard to watch, esp the one with the seizure, couldn't watch all of it :(

sorry to hear about Sadie. I personally feel that Oct 7 is too long to wait for a dog that is having daily seizures. like Mikey said earlier in this thread, if not just to get valium or other med to help during the seizure. i would insist on being seen sooner or take my dog elsewhere where she could be seen sooner.
 

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i have never had a dog that has had a seizure, but I can tell you I don't think I would be giving any more shots as I think they are a cause of it and your vet will never tell you that one. I would also look into what I was feeding.

I just looked up in my book Natural Health for dogs and cats (love this book) it can be inherited but Dr. Pitcairn thinks the biggest factor is yearly vaccinations. I can't go into it all but that would be the first thing I would do and he also says a natural food diet.

Would there be a homeopathic vet near you? That might be something to think about.
 

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The recent post to this thread brought back a flood of memories. Most of you know my Spencer has been at the Bridge for over a year now. And Kim, I had another Basset named Sadie, also at the Bridge. Anyway, after that first seizure, Spencer had another one about 7 months later. After those 2, he had no more. He was never diagnosed with anything & since he came out of both quickly, the vet was not too concerned. He was an old guy & had some other issues. I would definitely have a dog having daily seizures checked out & I wouldn't wait long.

Worm, yes that is Clifford in my avatar. :)

I didn't watch the videos posted. Seeing a seizure is horrible.
 

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I miss Spencer's happy face. (Sadie, I hope your owners can find a vet that can take you immediately. What's the point of having a vet that it takes a week to get an appointment with?)
 

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I didn't watch the videos posted. Seeing a seizure is horrible.
It was not easy for me to post actual having a dog during a status (lasting more than 5 minutes) siexure before we could get her to the vet.
 

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Spencer had a siesure

This is what Julius our ten year old male basset experiences.
When i keep him on the grain free dry food he is fine for a month since we put him on the grain free.
Then I give him some human food and then a couple days later her come the seisures/epilepsy again.
 

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For me, and I'm not a vet, early onset fitting is more likely to be epilepsy. Later on, there are many things that could cause seizures. I have to say epilepsy isn't unknown in Bassets - and it does tend to run in certain bloodlines, it being usually hereditary (epilepsy). I think you do need to tell whoever bred your hound - I used an outside stud dog for what was my final litter and later on, when the dog was about 8, heard he'd been put down after he started having seizures. Alone it wasn't other than a worry, to me. Then I heard the same thing had happened to his mother, at about the same age. Doing more research, I found enough to suggest to me that it was there, on his mother's side. Although the only connection between the dog and my line was on his sire's side (via Tal e Ho actually) I made the decision not to allow the male we'd kept to be used at stud, and spayed his sister who we'd also kept. Thus ending our bloodline. I just felt the buck had to stop somewhere. Actually neither of them fitted throughout their lives - we lost both to cancer when in their 12th, and 13th years.

Unfortunately true epilepsy can skip generations so if this does turn out to be epilepsy again the breeder should know so she doesn't ever do this pairing again.

Obviously from the answers you've had here already, this is around in the breed which is sad. It's also there in Bloodhounds and I do wonder whether the use of that breed, years ago, has left a legacy. :confused:

I hope the news suggests this is just a one-off with your hound - and know it's more distressing for the owner, than the dog. If it happens again, making sure he's somewhere thrashing around can't injure him, stay clear - dogs in a fit could bite as they are out of it. You do need to make sure he comes out of the fit however...... I saw this in a neighbour's dog who had heat-stroke. He didn't despite her vet's best efforts, and had to be pts.
 
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