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So sorry, just one more question. When is the best time to get a puppy spayed? The vet recommended 4 to 6 months. I also heard in the past from a previous vet that it is best to wait at 6 months. My pup is now 4 months and I am getting her fixed but just want to hear opinions about the best month to get this done...
 

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Our current vet recommends doing a spay at 5-6 months. She did mention that if you do it at 5 months, they heal up faster; I had not heard that before. We are having Ninja spayed on June 23rd, and she'll be a week short of 6 months.
 

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If we were talking males the health benefits of nuetering are over blown. A realistic look a the health risk vs addvanages actually favor keep males intacked.

The same is not the case for Females in which mamary cancer and pyoderma are potential life threatening conditions that are realitively common in intacted bitches but non existant in spayed. However the rate of mammary cancer and tumors in bitches is directly related to how many heat cycles the dog has had. If they are spayed before the first cycle the odd of mammary cancer is virtual nil , they increase quite dramatical if the bitch has one cycles and ieven more so if the dog as two which is approaching the same rate as for intacted bitches. So ideally you want to have a female spayed before the first heat cycle. which is ussual around six months of age or later but the are know to come into heat sooner as early as 4 1/2 month So I alway advocate for spay sooner rather than later but at the same time you do not want to push the vet into spaying a dog earlier than he/she is comfortable because spaying at a younger age does require different techniques and procedures and watching out for different problems during surgery. If option for early sterilization you want to only use a vet experience in doing so. . That said early spaying dogs as young a 8 weeks have shown to have few post surgical problems and pain then dogs where the procedure was done later.


Long-Term Health Risks and Benefits Associated with Spay / Neuter in Dogs

On balance, it appears that no compelling case can be made for neutering most male dogs, especially immature male dogs, in order to prevent future health problems. The number of health problems associated with neutering may exceed the associated health benefits in most cases

50-60% of mammary tumors are malignant, for which there is a significant risk of metastasis Mammary tumors in dogs have been found to have estrogen receptors, and the published research shows that the relative risk (odds ratio) that a female will develop mammary cancer compared to the risk in intact females is dependent on how many estrus cycles she experiences:
# of estrus cycles before spay Odds Ratio
None 0.005
1 0.08
2 or more 0.26
Intact 1.00


Early Sterilization in Dogs and Cats
Additionally, it has been reported that spaying young animals takes less time and holds less risk of hemorrhage than for adults.
 

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I think I might go with doing it at 5 months to try to avoid a heat. The last thing I want is for Gwenny to get pregnant. There is a huge bloodhound male that lives next door to my mom, lol. If she goes through a heat while we are at her house, it would not be good. So I will get her fixed before we go to visit.
 

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Our vet strongly recommends getting your females spayed before their first heat - she says this dramatically decreases their chances of developing cancer in the reproductive areas.
 

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Our vet reckons that 6 months is the ideal age for spaying and we had our two pups done
on the same day at exactly 6 months and so did my friend's Pug get done the same age!

I would have thought that any earlier than 6 months is too early and their reproductive
organs aren't as developed as they are a month later!
 

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Mike T

I've been meaning to ask this anyway..

I've also read that spaying a dog early can cause the bones to grow a bit longer than if spayed later, and that this is a concern in bassets as it can make the risk of bone and joint problems greater.. And the recommended time to spay is after 5 months but before the first heat cycle (like you said, is a gamble as they can come in earlier) but not to neuter males until after 11 months.

We are not planning on breeding our two, and plan on spaying the female at just after 5 months.. The vet suggested we do them at the same time so they would both be recovering at the same time and one who didn't have surgery wouldn't be playing too aggressive with the one that did. I'm not sure that is valid as I'm afraid surgery or not they will both still be more active then they should if we don't watch them anyway.

And after what you posted I'm not sure we need to neuter the male at all. But that being said, my stud male from back when breed beagles did have a lot of problems the vet said would have been lessened had I neutered him after we stopped breeding. So basically I'm confused.
At this point I am thinking of having her spayed, but not having him fixed at all.?
 

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we were always told at 6 months. Fred is 6 months now and will get done as soon as our income tax check comes in. We were also told spaying/neutering too early causes the growth plates to not close properly and the dog ends up growing differently. So Fred will get done in about a month.
 

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Honestly, in 30 years of keeping intact females and spaying them when they're older (7+ years) I've had ONE case of mammary tumor (which was huge), which was removed and never caused any more problems.

As far as I'm concerned, the main issues are:
1) If she goes into season, are you able to protect her from being bred "accidentally"? If you have any doubts at all, spay.
2) Are you willing to put up with hormonal mood swings, bleeding, false pregnancies, and watching for signs of mastitis and pyometra? If not, spay.

In the case of males, testicle removal is not a substitute for training.:D
 

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Most shelter puppies are spayed or neutered before leaving at 8 weeks (or right at 8 weeks) because they are usually required by law to do so. Vets have been doing this for years now.

If you have no intention to breed (and do the diligence, research, and care required) please consider spaying and neutering. Lord knows we don't need any more accidental litters.

In general there are often behavior improvements for neutered males (not always), and I don't know why anyone who doesn't intend to seriously breed would want to deal with the mess of a female in heat.

Before 1990, the general advice was to wait until the cat or dog was between 6-9 months of age. However, this is not taught in veterinary schools any more.
Here are the facts supported by every single research project I have encountered: There is no statistical difference in any physical or behavioral parameters in dogs and cats neutered (spayed or castrated) at an early age (9-20 weeks) or at a later age (6-9 months). No differences in height, weight, temperament, intelligence, etc. NO DIFFERENCES.
There is only one proven difference between early and later sterilization: In female dogs and cats, if they are neutered prior to the first heat cycle, they have virtually no chance of developing breast cancer. If the animal has just one heat cycle, the chance increases to 10 percent.
Dr. Lisa Howe at Texas A&M Veterinary School is the leading authority in this area, and I would suggest anyone contact her if they have particular questions.
– William Folger, D.V.M., M.S., A.B.V.P. (Feline) SNAP Medical Advisory Board Member
SNAP - Ask the Vet: Spay & Neuter Behavior Questions
 

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My opinion is that males not used for show or breeding need to be neutered.No matter how overblown the problems may be(testicular cancer etc.) why does someone want the boy dog humping everything from stuffed animals to legs.Yes,you can train them not to do so but when a bitch in the neighborhood comes into heat you aren't going to train that boy to stay in the yard,not easily and not reliably. Girls are the same ,not showing, don't breed, get spayed. My bitch goes through a false pregnancy everytime she has a heat,milk and everything. When you have milk you can have mastitis ,the breasts get red and hard,not fun for her ,not fun for you. The best age about 4-5 months for a bitch and 6 for a male. Vinny wasn't neutered till he was 3 because I had to prove to the breeder he wasn't show quality. He had no trouble adjusting at all.
 

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We're planning on getting Virga spayed at 6 months. I have absolutely NO desire to go through a heat cycle with her. I've never experienced one but just have a feeling I would not enjoy it and I don't want Doppler to potentially get riled up. So she'll be getting spayed at 6 months for that reason and the health benefits. Doppler got neutered at 6 months just because we felt it would be responsible to do so.
 

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males not used for show or breeding need to be neutered. No matter how overblown the problems may be(testicular cancer etc.) why does someone want the boy dog humping everything from stuffed animals to legs[/.quote]

The health issue of nueter vs unueter is just one aspect Unlike females in which it is general believed reduction in mammary tummors from spaying early is more benefitial than the other health problems created by spaying. That is not the case in males in which if anything nueter increases potential heath problems long term. There are other issues like nuetering before maturity effecting the size ( actual nuetering delays growth plate closure increasing height) and look of the dog. Many claim altering before maturty effect the look of the body and the head of many breeds. In dogs involved in dogsports there is increased hip dysplasia and CCL ligament problems reported in spayed and nuetered dogs over unaltered dogs so there are some legitimate reason not to do so.

FWIW humping is a common problem in nueter dogs as well. IT is a FAP (Fixed action Pattern) ie instinctual behavior and not totallty hormonally related. Hence the reason female dogs engage in the behavior as well.

We're planning on getting Virga spayed at 6 months. I have absolutely NO desire to go through a heat cycle with her.
Waiting until six month may be too late. some have been know to come in as early as 4 months, It is rare but it can happen.
 

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Waiting until six month may be too late. some have been know to come in as early as 4 months, It is rare but it can happen.
She's 5 and a half months old right now so I don't think two more weeks roughly will make a difference. I don't think she's gone through a heat cycle yet. Never having seen one I can't be sure. But I don't think she has.
 

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our vet says if Fred goes into heat we have to wait for the heat to be over than 3-4 weeks for her hormones to settle down. So we're really hoping she does not go into heat before our income tax gets here! But I was under the impression 6 months was "the age" to spay/neuter but our first dog we had when we got married came to us neutered so this's the first time we're dealing with this on my own, as an adult. And Fred and our kitten are both getting spayed the same time.
 

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If I recall correctly, and I rarely do except maybe this one time, when I took Annie to get spayed she was in heat...but it wasn't "visually" evident to me. They just let me know after the fact that the procedure was a bit messier than expected.
 

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our vet says if Fred goes into heat we have to wait for the heat to be over than 3-4 weeks for her hormones to settle down.
That is actual not the case but because of changes in the uteris because of a heat cycle there can be more complications so most vets prefer to wait but their is no absolute ban on the practice Those vets willing to do the surgery general charge more if the dog is in heat.

from http://www.vetinfo.com/dfemale.html]Female dog Problems[/url]
. It is possible to spay a female dog when she is in heat (some vets are uncomfortable doing this but most are willing). If you are planning on getting her spayed anyway you might want to discuss this with your vet.
Mike Richards, DVM


But I was under the impression 6 months was "the age" to spay/neuter
The is no definitive age any age comes with their pluses and minuses. With a female maximium protective efffect from mammary tummor which is the biggest health plus for spaying is befor the first heat cycle, After the first but before the second has a minimal increase in risk and after the second heat cycle the risk increases dramatically and continue to increase the longer it is delayed. However there are other risk that occur just in the opposite ratio so it is something that is not cut and dry. Given the genetics, breed histories, job-sports the dog is engaged in etc can change the landscape enourmously on when is the optimal time.

Early Spay-Neuter Considerations for the Canine AthleteOne Veterinarian's Opinion

Note this is specifcally for dogs involved in sporting activity because the liklihood of certain condition contributing to an injury etc the consideration for a dog involved in sports is much different than the average pet dog. INcreased CCL injuries is huge for a dog involved in sport not so much a pet dog etc.


Long-Term Health Risks and Benefits Associated with Spay / Neuter in Dogs


The traditional spay/neuter age of six months as well as the modern practice of pediatric spay/neuter appear to predispose dogs to health risks that could otherwise be avoided by waiting until the dog is physically mature, or perhaps in the case of many male dogs, foregoing it altogether unless medically necessary.

The balance of long-term health risks and benefits of spay/neuter will vary from one dog to the next. Breed, age, and gender are variables that must be taken into consideration in conjunction with non-medical factors for each individual dog. Across-the-board recommendations for all pet dogs do not appear to be supportable from findings in the veterinary medical literature.​


And keep in mind this is just health risk it does not address other issues as well.
 
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