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I am looking for some help from basset owners. My 1 1/2 year old female has started limping when she gets up. It is from her front shoulders and sometimes she crys out in such pain. We have taken her to the vet and by the time we get there she is fine and they send us home. Any ideas or help would be great.
 

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It might possibility be panosteitis. It usually comes on suddenly without any apparent injury, and can come and go. It can be very painful for the dog with limping and and when the affected area is squeezed they some definate signs of pain. At least our Bassets did. We have had two Bassets that have had this and crate rest was prescribed by our vet.

Here is some info. on it from the internet:
Panosteitis is a spontaneously occurring lameness that usually occursin large breed dogs. Panosteitis is most common in large breed dogs between 6 and 18 months of age. Occasionally, middle-aged German Shepherds will have a bout of panosteitis. It affects dogs worldwide and has been recognized and studied since the 1950's. Male dogs are much more likely to get panosteitis then females. There is a higher incidence in several breeds including German Shepherds, Great Danes, Doberman Pinschers, Golden Retrievers, Labrador Retrievers, Rottweilers, and Basset Hounds.

What causes panosteitis?
Affected dogs are usually in the 5 to 14 month age range and male dogs are more commonly infected than female dogs. The disease has been reported in dogs as young as 2 months and can occur in young mature dogs. The lameness tends to occur very suddenly, usually without a history of trauma or excessiveexercise. In most cases one or the other front leg is affected first and then the problem tends to move around, making it appear that the lamenessis shifting from leg to leg. There are often periods of improvement and worsening of the symptoms in a cyclic manner. This makes evaluation oftreatment difficult since many dogs will spontaneously recover with or without treatment and then relapse.

X-rays usually reveal that the bones have greater density than is normallyfound. If pressure is applied over the long bones, pain is usually present.The X-ray signs do not always match the clinical signs.


Read more: Panosteitis

I hope Sookie gets better quickly.
 

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while pano is a possibility the age and sex of the dog are fac tors that make a less likely cause. In the pain in in a joint it is not pano Pano effects the long bones of the limb. a quick but not always effective diagnostic tool is when she is limping. Is to squeeze each of the 3 long bones in the affected leg in the middle of each and compare to an unaffected leg. If pano there should be some indication of pain if one of the bones is squeezed i.e. the bone affected by pano at the momment.

If X-ray and other diagnostic tools have not be used they should be. most bassets front assemblies are not as structurally sound as they should be while it does not effect the majority of basset with less than ideal conformation there are some that do require surgical intervention to preven problems from getting worse as they get older. Elbow displasia is fairly common in the breed and only when it is bad enough does it cause a problem. It is generally best to consult with an orthopeadic vet that has much experience with basset hounds.


If it is a front shoulder the pain is comming from and not another part of the leg OCD leasion Is releatively common cause of shoulder pain in all breeds of dogs of this age.

Osteochondritis Dissecans

[URL="http://www.workingdogs.com/deboer_elbow1.htm]Elbow Dysplasia, Part 1 (Dr. Henry DeBoer Jr.)[/URL]

Elbow Dysplasia, Part 2 (Dr. Henry DeBoer Jr.)

All that said the most commom cause of limping is a soft tissue injury [ie sprain or strain) the thing is often these are much more difficult to treat and much slower in healing if at all than a bone anomally even though many think of them as being less severe. They are more difficult to diagnose as well.
 

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think a lot of Basset owners' joint problems are caused by owners walking their Bassets too far when young and letting them run up and down stairs and jumping on and off walls or beds etc etc.
Their is no evidence that this is the case. There is evidence however that the genetic cause of a bassets dwarfism, lead to increased joint problems and angular limb deformities. There is no doubt that trauma , not moderate exercise can cause these problems as well the fact that most of the problems are on the distal (far) end of the done that genetics not trauma is more often the cause. One can not rule out the role nutrition plays as well
 

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I'd definately suggest getting an xray done, waiting to see the results of this before making any decision re what course of action to take or not take after.

In the meantime some pain relief.

Bassets as verbal as they are in so many situations are very stoic when it comes to pain so I think your basset yelping in pain should be taken very seriously.

Hopefully an xray will shed light and healing
 
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