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I am so excited! :lol: I saw an ad in the paper yesterday for Basset Hound pups and I called today and will be going this afternoon to look at them. There are 4 males left - Tri, lemon and white, and one that is almost all black! They are 3 months old, had their first shots and have been wormed. My housemate agreed that she won't mind another Basset as long as someone else didn't raise him. The last experience was awful, although my first Basset was 4 years old when I got him and he was terrific. I considered getting another breed, but I so longed for another Basset. Being houndless was just awful! So, wish me luck! I asked the woman if I liked one, could I just pay for him but pick him up on Friday, since I won't be home tomorrow. She said that would be fine. I will have to get him a new crate. I received an e-mail from Pruina showing a new training tool for puppies. It's like a cat litter box with large pellets that you train a puppy to use. It can be put at the back of the crate so the puppy can go when you're not home. I am going to see if PetSmart has this.
 

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awww! you sound sooooo excited and i dont blame you.

if you're anything like me you'll already be thinking about what name you can call him!

cant wait to see his picture as i know you'll get one of them!

i feel all excited for you now
 

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So excited for you!!! We had to wait a whole week before we could bring Daisy Mae home. Just about killed me, but once she was home it just felt so right. Absence makes the heart grow fonder is definitely true. Congrats!! And like everyone else said.......we'll be waiting for lots of pictures!!
 

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I know how you feel....I have to wait 4 weeks for my baby.... :( ...she is only 2 weeks old right now....it is very hard to be patient...my house ia all puppy proofed and her kennell is ready for her...toys, blankie..everything...am i crazy or what? :D
 

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If you are we all are!!! :p

Oh wow, I can't believe it!! They finally changed my log in and I can get in!!!! Now the test is if I can get in under Baxter at work too.
 

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I know how you feel....I have to wait 4 weeks for my baby.... :( ...she is only 2 weeks old right now....it is very hard to be patient...my house ia all puppy proofed and her kennell is ready for her...toys, blankie..everything...am i crazy or what? :D
[/b]

Why are you bringing home a pup at six weeks? That's really way too young. Way too young. A good breeder will not let a pup go before at least eight weeks of age. I know two weeks doesn't sound like much, but a pup learns a lot from its siblings during that time.....
 

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Well...they are really big for their age...and already have eyes open and are roaming arond really well..they actually act more like 4 week olds.......plus they will be 6 weeks the day after christmas and the breeder is hoping to get them out in time for presents....if she isn't ready i won't take her....i want her to be ready before i take her from her mommy and littermates. .....as hard as it wil be i CAN wait if i HAVE to :rolleyes:
 

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I would HIGHLY suggest waiting until AT LEAST 8 weeks before you bring your puppy home. And this is directed to any dog breed in general.
I have experience with English Mastiffs...we brought the first one home at 12 weeks and the 2nd one home at 7 weeks. The difference between the two...was HUGE!! I cannot tell you how huge it was. Lex (the younger) was much more clingly...took longer to housebreak...he was a little more shy than the older one, and we treated them equally. Where we went, they went, he was exposed to "life" just as much as Church was.
My best friend experienced the same thing with her labs...its runs across the board with dogs, no matter how big they are.
My breeder wants to let Dallas (my expecting puppy) come home to me at 7 weeks, I have asked her to keep him until 9 weeks, I was trying for 12, but that was not working....I am telling you, you will be much happier in the end if you wait until at least 8 weeks.
 

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Maybe that's why Baxter is doing so well with housebreaking. Haven't even had to teach him not go where he shouldn't. He was 3 MONTHS old when we got him. He is just so sociable, friendly, playful and mindful. The Lab I have that's 14 years old was 3 MONTHS old when I got her and she too has been the most wonderful dog I ever had.

Now, did you see that??? I was coming up as "Baxter Basset" earlier and now I'm coming up as HOMER again!!! This is really weird! <_<
 

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I will definately consider letting her stay awhile.......I know the breeder will not have a problem with it (she calls the whole litter her "kids"..hahaha) Anyway...thanks for the advice .....any thing to help make house training easier will be worth it to me..I am terrible busy and am going to feel awful about the amount of time she will be in her kennell as it is. :(
 

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Its not just mothers, it the whole social thing as well. They learn from thier "elders" they see the "big boys" going outside, they want to do it too...thats how they learn...so Church already had some "doggy social skills" when we brought him home at 12 weeks, Lex...well...not so much. They were both really well behaved, Lex was just different.
 

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I would never buy a puppy from anyone who would let one leave before 8 weeks. Back yard breeders want you to take the pup away at 6 weeks so they don't have to administer the 8 week vaccinations. This does not sound like a reputable breeder to me.

I know because I've had a basset from a backyard breeder before I did my homework. It's so hard to wait for a pup when you are dead set on one, but this is a mistake to which you could pay for the next 10 years, when the dog is not properly socialized, and afraid of its own shadow. Worse yet it bites because it did not learn proper bite inhibition. Hopefully Mike T and Betsy can chime in here so I don't sound like such an old fuddy duddy.





edit:
Doh! Didn't mean to hijak this thread. I just noticed the original poster said the pups in question are 3 months! By all means get yourself a hound!!!!!
 

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I didn't mean to make it sound like the breeder wasn't good....she definately is...it was ME who asked about taking the pup at 6 weeks..NOT her....she said she has never let any go before 8 weeks before...but as I said with the holidays coming and since the pups were pretty big and fiesty for their age she said she would consider it...and I 'm sure she will pay for the 8 week shots regardless of whether I take the puppy early or not......this sounding any better???? :blink: :huh:
 

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I dont have anything to say about your breeder, I dont know her or the situatuon. I just want YOU to realize what you will be bringing home at 6 weeks, and what you can expect...I know you are excited about your little girl, as I am about bringing my baby home...but I know in the end, I will be much happier with a puppy that is just a wee bit older that 6 weeks....
 

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I totally understand....and really appreciate all the great advice....I am seriously thinking of letting her stay until at least 8 weeks old...maybe even longer. Thanks to everyone who posted......as I said I am new to bassetts and any advice is GREATLY appreciated ......and needed :)
 

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Why are you bringing home a pup at six weeks? That's really way too young. Way too young. A good breeder will not let a pup go before at least eight weeks of age. I know two weeks doesn't sound like much, but a pup learns a lot from its siblings during that time.....
[/b]
FWIW those that train and place service dogs have a much higher success rate with dogs that are removed for the litter at 6-7 week than later. Dogs that are removed from the litter at this age will have a bias toward being more people/human skills than dog skills/ around 8 weeks the dogs are more balanced 10-12 weeks more dogskills/than human skill. Of course this is all variable also on the dog individual socialization and temperment.

dogs removed earlier from the litter have a tendency to have reduced dog to dog comunication skills which can be problematic later in life if the dog must cope with other dogs however these dogs also typically bond stronger to humans than dogs removed later. For dogs that are to be humancentric and not likely to need dog/dog skills like guide dogs earlier removal from the litter is ideal.

When is the best time to remove the dog from the litter is not clear black and white. It depends on the individual dog, the actual socialization the dog recieves prior to and after seperation and so on, and the environmental situation the dog will live in afterwards. Dogs that are going to be in single dog households and have little or no contact with other dogs do not need as much dog/dog skills and more human/dog comunication skills could be benefitial. Dogs that need strong dog/dog skills and not as much human/dog skills like pack hunting skills should be left with the litter longer than the traditional 8 weeks. For most breeders the situation of the placed dogs is highly variable hence the desired for a balance between dog and human comunication/bonding and therefore the 8-10 week removal from the litter recommendation

of course this all deals with generalities and the specifics for any individual dog vary greatly certainly a high percentage of dogs will not fit the typical mold. Also the socialization the dog recieves after removal from the litter is just as important. A dog removed earlier from the litter but placed and socialize with many other dogs will have similar skill as a dog left with the litter.

Puppy Socialisation and Habituation (Part 1) - Why is it Necessary?
What practical applications do we have that bear out the research? Guide Dogs for the Blind, who, until 1956, used to rely on the donation of adult dogs which they took on approval to maintain their training stock. The success rate of these dogs fluctuated between 9 and 11 percent and it was recognised that this could be improved if the association could supervise the rearing of puppies. These were purchased and placed in private homes at between ten and twelve weeks old or even later. Things improved, but the results were not good enough. It was Derek Freeman, who pushed to have puppies placed in private homes at an earlier age to optimise socialisation and habituation during the critical development period. Derek had a strong belief in Scott and Fuller’s work and importance of early socialisation and habituation in the production of dogs that were best able to survive and perform in the world at large.

Derek found that six weeks was the best time to place puppies in private homes; any later critically reduced the time left before the puppies reached twelve weeks; but if puppies were removed from their dam and litter mates before six weeks they missed the opportunity to be properly socialised with their own kind, which resulted in inept interactions with other dogs in later life. The training success rate soared because of this policy, which was carried out in conjunction with the management of the gene pool via the breeding scheme Derek also pioneered. Annual success rates in excess of 75 percent became common. You might think that this is a special scheme for dogs with a special function. In fact, what the scheme provides is adult dogs with sound temperaments. These dogs coincidentally make the best material for guide dog training which does not start until they have been assessed at ten months or older. As a result of the breeding scheme, Derek Freeman also proved, if proof was needed, that you cannot dismiss the importance of genetic predisposition, i.e. the basic material required for good temperament can be produced through good breeding. Conversely, a lack of habituation/socialisation can ruin the chance of an individual developing a sound temperament, however good the genealogy.[/b]
*Bold added for emphysis
 

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Well, I'm still questioning this breeder. I know a slew of reputable breeders. None of them allow puppies to go to pet homes prior to eight weeks, and the fact that it's Christmas means just one thing to them: They will have pups in their house or kennel until after the new year. This person may refer to the pups as her 'kids', but there are a lot of red flags here......
 

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Well, I'm still questioning this breeder.[/b]
Agreed. No way a responsible breeder would consider letting a 6 week-old puppy go to a pet home. :(
 
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