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Our male basset puppy on various growth charts is predicted to be between 29-32 pounds. We honestly don't mind the small stature, but are there any reasons this should concern us? He is very healthy otherwise (though did already have a UTI - vet stated this wasn't too uncommon with puppies though, especially since they are so close to the ground and more easily get their bits dirty, and he seems to have recovered well). Is this perhaps a result of poor'ish breeding? I met the parents, and no way were they only 30 pounds, not huge, but not 30 pounds. I get that what matters most is that he is healthy, but 20 pounds short of the breed average seems pretty low.

Per the more conservative advice, we are going to hold off neutering until he is 18-24 months - has anyone actually experienced/witnessed any actual physical concerns from earlier neutering, though? Seems to be many studies saying to wait for "large breed" dogs, and then many studies debunking that advice. Because we travel, go to (a well vetted and we are happy there) daycare, will be attending group trainings, and interact with other dogs frequently, I would honestly prefer to neuter earlier if we can safely do so. So far we plan to wait, but I am open to some neuter now vs neuter later advice. (Yes, I see that there are other threads about it, but some are rather dated - what is the science saying today?)

I added the quotation marks because ours seems to perhaps be the smallest Basset ever :D

Thank you in advance! We are very excited to have - and very much in love with - our first Basset!
 

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science to date on nuetering males is overall for health they are better off for health, Longevity still goes with neutering because of wandering off. but imho that more has to do with how unneuter males are more likely to be owned by absentee neglectiful owners in this country so a lot of the so called benefits of nuetering ie increased infectious disease and being hit by cars speak more to who tends to have intact males vs benefits of neutering.


"On balance, it appears that no compelling case can be made for neutering most male dogs, especially immature male dogs, in order to prevent future health problems. The number of health problems associated with neutering may exceed the associated health benefits in most cases. "


think the charts you are using are likely off when it comes to adult size


 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
That's actually one of the charts I used :) I am going to weigh him again today.

I'll take a look at the other information you shared, thank you!
 

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Our male basset puppy on various growth charts is predicted to be between 29-32 pounds. We honestly don't mind the small stature, but are there any reasons this should concern us? He is very healthy otherwise (though did already have a UTI - vet stated this wasn't too uncommon with puppies though, especially since they are so close to the ground and more easily get their bits dirty, and he seems to have recovered well). Is this perhaps a result of poor'ish breeding? I met the parents, and no way were they only 30 pounds, not huge, but not 30 pounds. I get that what matters most is that he is healthy, but 20 pounds short of the breed average seems pretty low.

Per the more conservative advice, we are going to hold off neutering until he is 18-24 months - has anyone actually experienced/witnessed any actual physical concerns from earlier neutering, though? Seems to be many studies saying to wait for "large breed" dogs, and then many studies debunking that advice. Because we travel, go to (a well vetted and we are happy there) daycare, will be attending group trainings, and interact with other dogs frequently, I would honestly prefer to neuter earlier if we can safely do so. So far we plan to wait, but I am open to some neuter now vs neuter later advice. (Yes, I see that there are other threads about it, but some are rather dated - what is the science saying today?)

I added the quotation marks because ours seems to perhaps be the smallest Basset ever :D

Thank you in advance! We are very excited to have - and very much in love with - our first Basset!
Such a sweet pic!!! So -we rescued our third basset at 15mos (give or take) and we concerned that she was only 30 lbs. she had more energy than any basset we had before, longer legs, and we started doubting her bassetness. But she kind of evolved into a picture perfect girl, gained weight ( 53 by her 3rd bd). Still had the energy and was walking sometimes 3x/day. We changed her food up a few times to get the right mix for her and that did the trick. I wouldn’t worry too much. They have long muscular bodies to fill out.
 

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As our one year old is now weighing in at 65lbs and eats with relish, your little boy sounds very appealing, especially if he is a lap dog like ours. This is her waiting at my wife's feet as she cooks our dinner. Maisie has already been fed, but thinks being adorable will be rewarded with some chilli.
 

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Our male basset puppy on various growth charts is predicted to be between 29-32 pounds. We honestly don't mind the small stature, but are there any reasons this should concern us? He is very healthy otherwise (though did already have a UTI - vet stated this wasn't too uncommon with puppies though, especially since they are so close to the ground and more easily get their bits dirty, and he seems to have recovered well). Is this perhaps a result of poor'ish breeding? I met the parents, and no way were they only 30 pounds, not huge, but not 30 pounds. I get that what matters most is that he is healthy, but 20 pounds short of the breed average seems pretty low.

Per the more conservative advice, we are going to hold off neutering until he is 18-24 months - has anyone actually experienced/witnessed any actual physical concerns from earlier neutering, though? Seems to be many studies saying to wait for "large breed" dogs, and then many studies debunking that advice. Because we travel, go to (a well vetted and we are happy there) daycare, will be attending group trainings, and interact with other dogs frequently, I would honestly prefer to neuter earlier if we can safely do so. So far we plan to wait, but I am open to some neuter now vs neuter later advice. (Yes, I see that there are other threads about it, but some are rather dated - what is the science saying today?)

I added the quotation marks because ours seems to perhaps be the smallest Basset ever :D

Thank you in advance! We are very excited to have - and very much in love with - our first Basset!
I am a little relieved to see others with tiny bassets! Unfortunately, my Birdee is experiencing some joint issues at only 11 months old. As you can see from the picture, she is much smaller than her big sister. She currently weighs 38lbs. and really cannot gain much more or her poor legs won't hold her. She pops and grinds with every walk. I thought I was getting her from a reputable breeder but apparently not? She will also have to have surgery on her eyelids due to entropion. (Both eyelids roll in) Birdee is having x-rays this Friday to determine how bad her hips are and where to go from here. Good luck with your handsome boy! He really is adorable.
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her hips wo;; be bad, all basset hips are bad. all dwarf breed hips are bad but they very rare are the cause of pain. see Cardigan hip scores: A dose of orthopedic reality (Cardigan OFA, PennHIP, DI, etc.) even though about cardigans the same hold true for basset. Basset breeders have stopped test hips because scores have no relavance for the breed.

1 evaluation since 2018 Notice the purponderance of bad scores are dwarf breeds which seldom have hip issues.

A luxating Pettella (knee cap that pops out of place) is mucn more likely to cause rear leg pain in a basset hound. It is not rare in basset.
 

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her hips wo;; be bad, all basset hips are bad. all dwarf breed hips are bad but they very rare are the cause of pain. see Cardigan hip scores: A dose of orthopedic reality (Cardigan OFA, PennHIP, DI, etc.) even though about cardigans the same hold true for basset. Basset breeders have stopped test hips because scores have no relavance for the breed.

1 evaluation since 2018 Notice the purponderance of bad scores are dwarf breeds which seldom have hip issues.

A luxating Pettella (knee cap that pops out of place) is mucn more likely to cause rear leg pain in a basset hound. It is not rare in basset.
Both of her parents are very large dogs. Is it a fluke that she is "dwarded?"
 

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all bassets are dwarf ie shorted limb length. Meet 10 True Dwarf Dog Breeds

same Litter xena 32-36# bottom left group photo others in group photo bottom Leila mom 55-58, left to right top Brother Apollo 65+ Sister Artemis,Hermione Eowyn 56-60# Brother Sheldon 60-65# dexter 100-105 lbs
Dog Furniture Comfort Dog breed Carnivore
Smile Dog Dog breed Carnivore Mammal
 
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