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Our sweet lil 6 month old seems to be suffering from nearly constant skin issues and we're looking for some tried and true tips. She started with what the vet diagnosed as a yeast infection on her female parts (where she pees out of) as well as a few red, crusty, reddened patchy/bumps around her hind "leg" pits. We sprayed gentamicin 2x/day x 5 days per the vets orders and it seemed to clear up nicely. However not more than a few weeks later, more crusty red coloring to the female parts. This time around we swabbed her clean with hibiclens (since she had just recovered from a UTI and we didn't want that recur) and after a few "sqeaky clean" nights it looked better. The cycle has repeated itself multiple times since then where we either treat her with the gentamicin spray for the bumps or the hibiclens wash for the crusty nether regions.

At this time we are thinking it's an allergy and are ready to switch food. We're feeding her science diet puppy food right now and checking out solid gold and innova. However, the reason we went with science diet was that the vet stated that their claims were scientifically proven. Of course she also said that science diet is one of the only companies that sends out the results to vets. Therefore, I'm sure there are other studies out there so has anyone ever heard of the AAFCO? Are they a legitimate organization? I can't switch on testimonials alone... gotta have real proof!

We're worried that it might be stemming from our daily walks. It might be important to note we live in Oregon and as you might guess we get a fair amount of rain. We in fact tried on rain coats the other day (which was hillarious) but decided she really needs rain pants or some sort of a belly cover instead! We try to either dry her down or give her a bath when she's filthy and/or soaking wet. So before we run out and buy side by side doggie/human treadmills... what are your thoughts? Are we missing something?

Thanks in advance, you all are a tremendous resource! The "honorary mascot" thanks you also. :D
 

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The cycle has repeated itself multiple times since then where we either treat her with the gentamicin spray for the bumps or the hibiclens wash for the crusty nether regions.[/b]
I don't know if there is a final solution to this- Murray is 5 and I just treat his arm pit problems as a chronic condition.

I consult with our vet when things seem to get worse, but basically we just have a daily routine: I check his skin every morning, and do what seems to be needed: if there is evidence of yeast, I swab with Malaseb Flush; if there are sore places I spray with Genticin; in the summer to keep the area dry( and if there are no sore places) I dust with Gold Bond Medicated Baby Powder.

He was tested for allergies when he was a pup and we learned that he is allergic to just about everything: dust, pollen,and protein sources other that fish. A big spoon of Dannon Plain Yougurt with each meal does seem to help the yeast problem a bit.

Anyway, that's just my personal experience, maybe someone else can make other suggestions-
 

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Yogi also suffers from allergies. I do check his skin in his known problem areas which are mostly his front feet (occasionally back ones too) and his arm pits pretty much every day. I also check his ears since they will flare up if his feet are bothering him. Last year around September or October I put him on 3V Caps and they really seem to have made a BIG difference with his skin problems. His armpits look better than they ever have and we don't seem to be having as many problems with his feet. I use Gold Bond on his underarms just like Murray's mom does and when his feet are flaring up I use Chlorexiderm Shampoo or Nolvasan Shampoo for foot soaks in a mixing bowl. If the yeast seems to be getting bad I use Panalog oinment in between his toes after I soak them and they are fully dry. I recently ordered Malaseb Wipes so I can use them on his feet to see how that works for him. I hope they will be here by the end of the week. My vet does not stock them so I had to order them online. I get so tired of the foot soaks when he is having problems, but it does help him. I do those twice a day for a week or so when needed. I only had to do them once this winter so I am pleased about that! I am ever so thankful that he is very cooperative with the foot soaks so I don't have to put him in the tub all the time. He is a very big boy! I notice for Yogi, when it is wet out that is when he seems to have more problems so I am guessing he might have allergies to mold. I just try to dry his feet really well which does help. Knock on wood we have not had any major problems for a few months. We will see what happens in the summer. I am doing the 3V Caps for a whole year to see how well they work. At the end of that time I will make a decision as to whether or not I want to keep him on them forever. There have been a couple times where the allergies got out of control and he had to go to the vet but in the last few months since he has been on the 3V Caps it hasn't been a problem. So I really do think they are helping him. It does take a couple months for them to start working though. It took quite some time for me to find out the best things to do for Yogi and I am sure that you will find what works best for your hound as well. Good luck!
 

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Thanks so much! Is allergy testing something that all vets do? I remember my parents Westie having to go to the dog dermatologist, which was a little spendy. Its funny her feet are totally fine, which is good, because she HATES mud puddles so I can't imagine the foot soak going all that well. :huh: The 3V caps look like vitamin supplements, what food do you use? Is that something we can get from switching the food? Panalog looks like one powerful drug, something to keep in mind if she gets really bad.

PS I love the name Yogi, so appropriate!
 

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I think most vets would offer allergy testing. The vet I used to go to had a vet that specialized in skin problems and she was most helpful with Yogi. I decided not to have him tested for allergies because I have no intention of giving him allergy shots. I did do a food trial for Yogi for like 12 weeks to rule out food issues. That did not seem to be the problem. So I just try and manage them as best as I can and it did take some time to find out what works for him.
The 3V Caps are fish oil, basically. I currently have Yogi on AvoDerm (he has been on that for a couple years) but plan on switching him to a new food in a few weeks.
Thanks for the kind comment about Yogi's name! I went through 2000 dog names and narrowed it down to five and took another week to decide on his name! :lol:
 

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I decided not to have him tested for allergies because I have no intention of giving him allergy shots.[/b]
That's a good point- when I had Murray tested, it was very expensive, and I was intending to give him allergy shots, but that didn't work out(he got hives after the first shot!) so I feel like we spent alot of money for nothing.

The 3V caps are a good suggestion- I don't use those, but do give Murray salmon a few times each week.
 

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I discovered that Fred is allergic to corn when I fed him corn based food and he would scratch a lot, had dry flaky skin, and would drink water like he lived on a desert. Also, his poop was soft to watery. I changed his food to Pro Plan for sensitive skin and stomach, which contained no corn, wheat, or soy with salmon as the #1 ingredient. Well now, he has a very shiny coat, he doesn't scratch at all, and has been over all a very happy pup. You may want to look at the ingredients of her food as well, so that it can be ruled out also. From what Ive read, food allergies are common in bassets and it does play a factor with skin allergies.
 

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Food is one of the least likely causes of alergies in dogs. only 10% of all alergies are food related. You will probably want to investigate possible environmental allergies first. there are blood antigen test for a large munber of atopic alergens,

Also keep in mind another cause of secondary yeast infections is bassets is seborrhea.


Most primary care Vets do not have the training, knowledge and skill the multiple layer to get to the primiary cause of most skin condition you may want to get a refferral to a vet that specializes in dermatology.

Find a Dematologist


Patricia F. Ashley, DVM
Private Practitioner
Veterinary Allergy & Dermatology Service .
1863 Pioneer Parkway East, PMB # 342
Springfield, OR 97477
(541) 988-5458
(541) 746-0599 (FAX)

Terese C. DeManuelle, DVM
Private Practitioner
Allergy & Dermatology Veterinary Referral Ctr.
6323 S. E. King Road
Milwaukie, OR 97222
(503) 777-8999
(503) 775-9212 (FAX)

Christine Graham-Mize, DVM
Private Practitioner
Animal & Dermatology
Veterinary Referral Center
6323 SE King Road
Milwaukie, OR 97222
(503) 777-8999
(503) 775-9212 FAX

Alan C. Mundell, DVM
Private Practitioner
Animal Dermatology Service
6525 15th Avenue NW
Seattle, WA 98117
(206) 789-2959
(206) 781-8659 (FAX)

Jonathan D. Plant, DVM
Assistant Professor
Magruder 273
College of Veterinary Medicine
Oregon State University
Corvallis, OR 97331-4802
 

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If you change foods, try Wellness brand in the senstive style (its a light blue bag) or a lamb and rice food. Certainly not a food with corn or soy in it if you think you have allergy issues. Corn and soy, two of the top 3 causes of food allergys in dogs (look at what your current food has as the fist couple ingredients and then look up corn and dog food to verify how bad it is).
 

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try changing your cleaning products, that might help. Pinesol being an example of a super irritating cleaner. but it could also be the smells in your laundry detergent or softener (you probly don't even realize how many different artificial/chemical smells you encounter in your daily life... not to mention we add on to it with perfume that has no other purpose)
 

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Our doggie derm recommended an air filter near where the dogs sleep for allergies, and more frequent bathing. Pearl had allergy tests some years ago, and has been on the shots ever since. Her allergies have gradually gotten better, so it may all be helping.
 

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In my not so humble opinion, Science Diet is crap food and I wouldn't give it to my dogs if it were free. There's very little in real nutrition in there, and lots of fillers.

Vets are NOT nutritionists.

It is also my opinion that diet makes a huge difference in a dog's health. Even if your dog is not allergic to a particular food, a sound nutritional base helps to build a strong body and immune system.

I've seen considerable difference in the health of both myself and my dogs, depending on what we are eating.
 

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In my not so humble opinion, Science Diet is crap food and I wouldn't give it to my dogs if it were free. There's very little in real nutrition in there, and lots of fillers.

Vets are NOT nutritionists.

It is also my opinion that diet makes a huge difference in a dog's health. Even if your dog is not allergic to a particular food, a sound nutritional base helps to build a strong body and immune system.

I've seen considerable difference in the health of both myself and my dogs, depending on what we are eating.[/b]
Soundtrack--
What *do* you feed your dogs? I agree with you that we are what we eat--but I really can't figure out what's a horrible dog food, what's a lot of fluff, and what is a really sound healthy diet (Oh, please, don't say that I have to cook anything for the four legged ones)
 

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Currently I'm feeding Kirkland, either Chicken & Rice or Lamb & Rice. Sally is on a homemade diet, and Chili is on Orijen.

I consider Kirkland to be "decent" food - not crap but not top of the line. However, if I had the time and the money they'd all be eating homemade.
 

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Given the age of your puppy, I would wonder if her skin problems are resulting from her puppyhood series of vaccinations -- which are quite a load for a small body. You might want to read the information below to see if anything rings a bell with your little lady's symptoms. If so, then you might want to ask your veterinary care provider about it.


Ischemic Dermatopathy / Cutaneous vasculitis

A little known and often misdiagnosed reaction to the rabies vaccine in dogs, this problem may develop near or over the vaccine administration site and around the vaccine material that was injected, or as a more widespread reaction. Symptoms include ulcers, scabs, darkening of the skin, lumps at the vaccine site, and scarring with loss of hair. In addition to the vaccination site, lesions most often develop on the ear flaps (pinnae), on the elbows and hocks, in the center of the footpads and on the face. Scarring may be permanent. Dogs do not usually seem ill, but may develop fever. Symptoms may show up within weeks of vaccination, or may take months to develop noticeably.

Dogs with active lesion development and / or widespread disease may be treated with pentoxyfylline, a drug that is useful in small vessel vasculitis, or tacrolimus, an ointment that will help suppress the inflammation in the affected areas.

Owners and veterinarians of dogs who have developed this type of reaction should review the vaccination protocol critically and try to reduce future vaccinations to the extent medically and legally possible. At the very least, vaccines from the same manufacturer should be avoided. It is also recommended that the location in which future vaccinations are administered should be changed to the rear leg, as far down on the leg as possible and should be given in the muscle rather than under the skin.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vaccination_of_dogs
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A retrospective study of canine and feline cutaneous vasculitis
Patrick R. Nichols**Animal Allergy and Dermatology Center of Central Texas, 4434 Frontier Trail, Austin, Texas 78745, USA
Daniel O. Morris††Department of Clinical Studies, Veterinary Hospital, University of Pennsylvania, 3850 Spruce St., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, USA and
Karin M. Beale‡‡Gulf Coast Veterinary Dermatology and Allergy, 1111 West Loop South, Suite 120, Houston, Texas 77027, USA
*Animal Allergy and Dermatology Center of Central Texas, 4434 Frontier Trail, Austin, Texas 78745, USA †Department of Clinical Studies, Veterinary Hospital, University of Pennsylvania, 3850 Spruce St., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, USA ‡Gulf Coast Veterinary Dermatology and Allergy, 1111 West Loop South, Suite 120, Houston, Texas 77027, USA
Correspondence: Daniel O. Morris, Department of Clinical Studies, Veterinary Hospital, University of Pennsylvania, 3850 Spruce St., Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA. E-mail:[email protected]
Abstract

Twenty-one cases of cutaneous vasculitis in small animals (dogs and cats) were reviewed, and cases were divided by clinical signs into five groups. An attempt was made to correlate clinical types of vasculitis with histological inflammatory patterns, response to therapeutic drugs and prognosis. Greater than 50% of the cases were idiopathic, whereas five were induced by rabies vaccine, two were associated with hypersensitivity to beef, one was associated with lymphosarcoma and two were associated with the administration of oral drugs (ivermectin and itraconazole). Only the cases of rabies vaccine-induced vasculitis in dogs had a consistent histological inflammatory pattern (mononuclear/nonleukocytoclastic) and were responsive to combination therapy with prednisone and pentoxifylline, or to prednisone alone. Most cases with neutrophilic or neutrophilic/eosinophilic inflammatory patterns histologically did not respond to pentoxifylline, but responded to sulfone/sulfonamide drugs, prednisone, or a combination of the two.

http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi/abs/1...93.2001.00268.x
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Vitale, Gross, Magro (1999)
Vaccine-induced ischemic dermatopathy in the dog
Veterinary Dermatology 10 (2), 131–142.
doi:10.1046/j.1365-3164.1999.00131.x

Prev Article Next Article
Full Article
Vaccine-induced ischemic dermatopathy in the dog
Vitale,
Gross &
Magro
1Department of Medicine and Epidemiology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, California 95616, USA, 2IDDEX Veterinary Services, California Dermatopathology Service, 2825 KOVR Drive, West Sacramento, California 95605, USA, 3Department of Pathology, Beth Israel Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Pathology Services, Inc., 640 Memorial Drive, Cambridge, Massuchusetts 02139, USA
Correspondence to: Carlo B. Vitale
Present address: Encina Veterinary Hospital, 2803 Ygnacio Valley Road, Walnut Creek, California 94598, USA.
Abstract
Post-rabies vaccination alopecia associated with concurrent multifocal ischemic dermatopathy was identified in three unrelated dogs. All dogs received subcutaneous rabies vaccine dorsally between the scapulae several months prior to observation of the initial area of alopecia at the vaccination site. All three dogs developed multifocal cutaneous disease within 1–5 months after the appearance of the initial skin lesion. Cutaneous lesions were characterized clinically by variable alopecia, crusting, hyperpigmentation, erosions, and ulcers on the pinnal margins, periocular areas, skin overlying boney prominences, tip of the tail, and paw pads. Lingual erosions and ulcers were observed in two dogs. Histopathologic examination of the skin revealed moderate to severe follicular atrophy, hyalinization of collagen, vasculopathy, and cell-poor interface dermatitis and mural folliculitis. Hypovascularity was demonstrated by diminished Factor VIII staining of blood vessels. Nodular accumulations of lymphocytes, plasma cells, and histiocytes in the deep dermis and panniculus also were noted at the rabies vaccination site. An atrophic, ischemic myopathy paralleling the onset of skin disease was identified in two dogs. Histological examination of muscle biopsy specimens demonstrated perifascicular atrophy, perimysial fibrosis, and complement © 5b-9 (membrane attack complex) deposition in the microvasculature of both dogs with myopathy. Marked improvement of the skin disease was obtained with oral pentoxifylline and vitamin E.

http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi/abs/1...64.1999.00131.x

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The Armed Forces Institute of Pathology
Department of Veterinary Pathology
WEDNESDAY SLIDE CONFERENCE
2002-2003

CONFERENCE 19
26 February 2003

Conference Moderator:
Dr. Michael Goldschmidt, MSc, BVMS, MRCVS Diplomate, ACVP
Professor, School of Veterinary Medicine
University of Pennsylvania
Philadelphia, PA 19104-6051

CASE II - 2513-02 (AFIP 2839301)

Signalment: 5-year-old, male, castrated, canine, Chihuahua
History: One by three cm lesion on the dorso-lateral neck
Gross Pathology: None
03WSC19 - 2 -
Laboratory Results: None

Contributor’s Morphologic Diagnosis: Post-rabies vaccination alopecia with injection site granuloma and panniculitis

Contributor’s Comment: The hair follicles are markedly atretic and their lower portions are replaced by an eosinophilic, hyaline stroma. The deeper dermis also has a cleft or seroma pocket that is partially lined by a thin layer of foamy macrophages and multinucleated giant cells with more peripheral lymphoid nodules with many scattered dermal macrophages, lymphocytes and plasma cells. Scattered melanin-laden macrophages (positive with Fontana-Masson melanin stain and negative for hemosiderin with a Prussian blue stain) are in the hyalinized lengths of the hair follicles with a few beneath the epidermal basement membrane (pigmentary incontinence).

This is post-rabies vaccination alopecia with an underlying injection site granuloma. Post-rabies vaccination alopecia is most commonly seen in toy or small breeds, especially Poodles, but Chihuahua cases have been reported. The lesion usually develops three to six months after vaccination.

Other reports describe mild to severe lymphocytic inflammation with macrophages in the superficial or deep dermis or scattered around hair follicle remnants. The dermis may have smudging of the collagen, especially around the hair follicles. Rabies vaccine antigen has been found in the hair follicle epithelium and in the walls of vessels in the area. One report of focal alopecia developing in all twelve of twelve inbred miniature Poodles injected with a killed rabies vaccine two months earlier suggest that there may be a familial predisposition to this apparently idiosyncratic, hypersensitivity reaction to the antigen.

http://www.afip.org/vetpath/WSC/wsc02/02wsc19.pdf
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Article entitled, ISCHEMIC SKIN DISEASE IN THE DOG by Dr. Peter J. Ihrke, VMD, DACVD
Professor of Dermatology, Chief, Dermatology Service, VMTH, Department of Medicine & Epidemiology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA, USA presented at the World Small Animal Veterinary Association 2006 Congress (article accessible at http://www.vin.com/proceedings/Proceedings...&O=Generic).

The following are quotes from Dr. Ihrke's presentation:

3. Localized post-rabies vaccination panniculitis (Post-Rabies): A localized ischemic skin disease associated with a rabies vaccination site and temporal link with the vaccination.

4. Generalized vaccine-induced ischemic dermatopathy (GVIID): A generalized ischemic skin disease with a temporal linkage with rabies vaccination, but with more severe generalized post-rabies vaccination-associated disease
.


2. Post-rabies vaccination associated disease is presumed to be due to an idiosyncratic immunologic reaction to rabies antigen that partially targets vessels. Rabies viral antigen can be documented in the walls of dermal blood vessels and in the epithelium of hair follicles via immunofluorescent testing. Since this syndrome is seen predominantly in very small dogs, it is tempting to speculate that the disease may be partially linked to increased antigenic load in comparison to the body size of the dog, since the same volume of rabies vaccine is given to all dogs subcutaneously.

Initial lesions--an alopecic macule or plaque develops at the site of prior subcutaneous rabies vaccine deposition. The time between vaccination and noting of the lesion usually is between one and three months.
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http://www.vin.com/proceedings/Proceedings...2&O=Generic

Cutaneous Vasculitis and Vasculopathy
Verena K. Affolter
School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis
Davis, CA, USA

" Immune-mediated vasculitis is typically triggered by an adverse drug reaction (antibiotics, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications, vaccines,...."

"Vaccine-induced vasculitis is mainly seen in small breed dogs...."

"Acute vasculitis--Legs and feet, ears, lips, tip of the tail, scrotum, and oral mucosa are mostly affected. These areas are more vulnerable as their blood supply has limited collateral circulation. With cutaneous vasculitis erythema, ecchymoses, areas of necrosis, and well-demarcated, "punched out" ulcers, and occasionally hemorrhagic bullae and/or pustules are seen. Erythema caused by vasculitis does not blanche with diascopy because of extravasation of the red blood cells. Subcutaneous vasculitis presents as nodular lesions. Systemic vasculitis causes variable clinical signs depending on the organ systems involved: phasic pyrexia, lethargy, anorexia, myalgia, arthralgia, lymphadenopathy and nasal discharge are seen. Wide spread systemic vasculitis may progress into shock and disseminated intravascular coagulation.
Chronic vasculitis--Less severe or slowly progressive vasculitis results in low-grade ischemia. Clinically these cases become evident at a chronic stage. Patchy alopecia, scaling, erythema and hyperpigmentation are seen. Lesions typically involve the pinnae, face, feet and tip of the tail often occurring over pressure points."


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Combination Vaccines, Multiple Shots--on Page 16 of the 2003 AAHA Guidelines under Immunological Factors Determining Vaccine Safety, it states that: "Although increasing the number of components in a vaccine may be more convenient for the practitioner or owner, the likelihood for adverse effects may increase. Also, interference can occur among the components. Care must be taken not to administer a product containing too many vaccines simultaneously if adverse events are to be avoided and optimal immune responses are sought. "
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Duration of Immunity to Canine Vaccines: What We Know and Don't Know, Dr. Ronald Schultz http://www.cedarbayvet.com/duration_of_immunity.htm

World Small Animal Veterinary Association 2007 Vaccine Guidelines http://www.wsava.org/SAC.htm Scroll down to Vaccine Guidelines 2007 (PDF)

The 2003 American Animal Hospital Association's Canine Vaccine Guidelines are accessible online at http://www.leerburg.com/special_report.htm .

The 2006 American Animal Hospital Association's Canine Vaccine Guidelines are downloadable in PDF format at http://www.aahanet.org/PublicDocumen...s06Revised.pdf .

Veterinarian, Dr. Robert Rogers,has an excellent presentation on veterinary vaccines at http://www.newvaccinationprotocols.com/
 

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We have yucky arm pits and between the toe problems at times, too. The vet tested and Bogie's is usually the result of a yeast infection. She told us we could use "Miconazole 7", the same product that women use for yeast infections, and by it over the counter for Bogie. It works really well. After it clears up we use "Tinactin" antifungal powder and sprinkle in the pits and on the toes. We know his usually starts up during wet outdoor conditions, and with the melting snow now it's tough keeping toes and pits dry. We just started treating his arm pits today, since they are looking reddish and irritated. No problems since last September, or course we have had frozen tundra since then. With Spring comes the yeast infection.
 

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My vet informed me that many dogs are allergic to wheat. I feed my dogs Wellness. Jack had some problems in the past year with yeast infections in his right ear. I was feeding him Wellness, but also giving him treats that had wheat. Now I only give wheat free treats, and Jack hasn't had any more ear issues. Maggie sometime gets red bumps near her private area in the summer. I think her skin reacts to grass. I put Golds Powder on, and this seems to due the trick. Jim
 

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We have had all these problems with Bo especially her armpits and we have found that the best advice given to us is to give her a normal strength (human strength) hay fever tablets and these had worked a treat and her skin is much improved. We were also recommended by our vet to give her a daily evening primrose tablet which we were advised would help with her skin, fur and joints. The poor girl rattles in the morning having these two tablets along with her glucosamine but she has substantially improved since having her daily medication and i would recommend these rememdies to anyone with a hound.

lets us know how you get on. :D
 
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