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hi everyone! new here! i'm looking to adopt a 6/7 yr old basset beagle mix, but I have a 8 month old lab and children as well. I am just wondering if he would be too "old" for that circumstance? What do you all think?
 

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I will add that both the potential new doggie and my pup are neutered so hopefully the male-male thing wouldn't be an issue???
 

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I think it depends less on the age and more on the personality mixture of everyone involved.
 

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and the age of the children. That said it is usually easier to bring a puppy into a new home that included other dogs than an adult because a puppy has something called "puppy license" which means adult let the get away with behaving inappropriately till about 5-6 month of age. after adult can be hell on puppies. Given yours is * month and in the middle of adolescence the adult may find it necessary to teach the puppy manners. Not saying you should not adopt at this time but it is a consideration. see Labrador Rescue Blog: The Puppy License and its loss "Puppies up to 4 ½ to 5 months of age appear to have something called a ‘puppy license’ – something that allows them to be an absolute pest to older dogs without repercussion. You see puppies being down right rude in dog terms doing things like jumping on older dogs, stealing food and toys from adults, barking right in the face of an adult or worse still humping them – and the adults just seem to put up with it, and even expect it – at least well socialised dogs do (dogs with good dog communication and social skills).

However at about this age the license expires as the puppies hormone levels change and they develop psychologically. Adult dogs now start to insist on the puppy controlling their behaviour and being more respectful in their interactions – and this comes as a shock to many puppies who ignore the more subtle signs until an adult dog (maybe their best pal at home, a friend at the park or a total stranger) snaps back – figuratively and sometimes literally. The adult dogs might:

· Bark (roar) at an adolescent displaying inappropriate behaviour.

· Plant the adolescent’s face into the dirt with a well placed paw (something my boy was doing to other younger and over the top puppies at only 12 weeks of age – and which caused some distress until I figured out what was going on).

· Knock the adolescent with their muzzle or mouth.

· Snap at them.

The messages might be relatively peaceful and quick or they might appear and sound like a major scuffle if not full out fight – and the adolescent will generally be doing the majority of the screaming. But if there are no wounds then do not panic – now or the next time you see or meet this adult dog or any adult dog, or your adolescent will pick up this fear from you and act on it. This does not mean that you should put up with inappropriately socialised/skilled adult dogs or other adolescents bullying and picking on or terrifying your pup – so if you are concerned, if blood is drawn or punctures made then seek professional help."
 
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