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Anyone out there experiencing arthritis or something similar with their bassets due to the short legs?

And a big thanks to the cruel people who decided to breed bassets with short legs. Our beautiful basset / lab mix was just diagnosed with acute arthritis in her elbows, and she isn't even 2yrs old! Feeling bummed out now. :(
 

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I'm very sorry your very young dog is suffering from arthritis... are you sure about the diagnosis? Did you have puppy from eight or nine weeks of age? If so, did you walk him too early, or allow him up and down the stairs?

My family have had many Bassets (mostly rehomes of varying ages) and several as young puppies, but we have never had any leg joint problems with any of them! Almost all of them have lived to 13/14/15 with the exception of two we lost to cancer at 11 and 12 but we have ALWAYS been very strict about not allowing our Bassets up and down stairs and only garden play for very young pups and very short gentle walks (several times a day) for puppies, building up gradually until they are 10 - 12 months old, and none of them have had any joint problems.

I wonder if it's worth getting a second opinion because a lot of people reckon that many vets don't know enough about Bassets and arthritis seems quite severe for such a young dog... maybe the Lab in him is causing the problem because of their occasional known problem of hip or elbow dysplasia!
 

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Thanks for your response, Sophie. I'm glad to hear that you have had such success with your dogs... That's great!

Anyway, we got this diagnosis from an orthopedic specialist who took X-Rays of Dinky (yes Dinky) today. From my untrained eye, it did look like her bones do not do what they're supposed to do. The orthopedist seemed quite certain, but you are certainly right in that one can never know for sure...

Dinky has had serious fits of yelping pains on several occasions, which prompted us to get her checked out. We adopted her when she was ~8mo, and she has been pretty much given the run of wherever she wants to go (which seems to have been a mistake). We have been limiting her activity lately, which seems to have been a big help. Hydrotherapy is next. Any other advice is welcome.
 

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yep, my big guy has arthritis in both back legs. He is nine now and was diagnosed approximately one and a half years ago but the vet reckons he had it a while before that.

I got him at eighteen months and was very much aware that bassets had to be careful about jumping off furniture, using steps etc. I took every precaution so that he would not injure himself but what happened before he came to me I have no idea.

He is now on Metacam daily (anti-inflammatory) and Seraquin (glocusamin chondrotin). Really seems to work for him. At night he sleeps in a crate which is covered with a heavy blanket and has an extra soft and thick mattress so that he is out of draughts and is comfortable.

Unfortunately, long walks are now a thing of the past and the longest stretch he has now is about forty minutes, although he would be happy to do more. I occasionally do the Hydro Therapy and find it really helpful and he sleeps like a log afterwards. Also when he is resting I was shown how to massage his legs and move them so that he is more supple.

All in all I find him much happier and MORE energetic now than he was before he was diagnosed with arthritis. As A side note I stopped the Seraquin for a while and he was certainly a lot stiffer and not wanting to exercise at all.

Vet told me that this condition was common in bassets because of the reason you stated and to never let him get heavy (He never was) as this puts more pressure on those joints.

Hopefully your little guy will respond as well to the treatment as mine has.:)
 

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Pearl has had arthritis since she was about three in her hips. About that time, she went on a diet, and lost about 10 pounds over a year. That helped a lot, and the arthritis has been controlled with occasional Rimadyl, and, now that's she's 10, 1/2 Rimadyl tab a day. She's very happy, comfortable and active. She still loves to track, and is working on urban tracking. Being active, thin and using pain medication when needed has made a big difference, and she's one happy hound. Hopefully, you'll find the right combination for your hound, and all will be well.
 

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Hydro Therapy

Thank you all for your kind posts. I'm glad I posted here. Anyway, I am just a recent dog owner, so this news has been disheartening.

But can anyone tell me how often a basset would need hydrotherapy?

Thanks again.
 

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What happens when some stupid person breeds a very long legged dog to a very short legged breed? Nothing good.
 

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Good point, bubbad. We got Dinky because we figured the dispositions of bassets and labs would be such a good mix, and we were right. She is just the sweetest dog ever! And besides, she was a rescue dog, so it felt like the right thing to do. As with any mixed breed, I can imagine there would be risks involved, but that was a risk we were willing to take.
 

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And thats ok but most likely the basset part isn't the only thing at fault here as someone else mentioned, Labs have what I may consider, a large amount of hip problems. So, even if the hips are not dysplastic it would not be hard to figure out there still could be the situation you have now. I hope you can make her comfortable. I guess I'm just saying don't be mad at us for breeding short legs. A good breeder would never cross two different breeds to begin with.
 

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It's interesting, our beloved cockapoo was diagnosed with hip displaysia and arthritis almost 3 years ago at about age 9, and she was at the point where she couldn't walk. With a very knowledgeable vet, patience on all our parts, and a regimen of Deramaxx and Adequan (glucosamine injection), she was able to run and kind of jump until the day she died. Her passing was not related to her diagnosis or meds...she had a stroke. But my point is that with the right treatments and meds, your pup can have a full, happy life. With our dog, we couldn't take her for walks anymore. She wouldn't last very long on the walk and then the next day she was in pain, so we stopped. We found other ways to get her exercise. Playing a couple rounds of fetch, things like that. I wish you luck with you dog :)
 

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And thats ok but most likely the basset part isn't the only thing at fault here as someone else mentioned, Labs have what I may consider, a large amount of hip problems. So, even if the hips are not dysplastic it would not be hard to figure out there still could be the situation you have now. I hope you can make her comfortable. I guess I'm just saying don't be mad at us for breeding short legs. A good breeder would never cross two different breeds to begin with.
My thoughts too about a good breeder crossing two breeds and I'm at a loss in wondering WHY there is a craze for "designer" breeds these days... eg, crossing a Poodle and a Lab to get a Labradoodle and then charging many hundreds of £s... when in the past these cross-bred dogs would have been called a name I hate (mongrels) and would be cheap to buy.... or am I missing something?

If I am, can someone please explain 'designer' breeds to me?? :confused:
 

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a big thanks to the cruel people who decided to breed bassets with short legs
Leg length has nothing to do with arthirtis. As a matter of fact arthiris is much more of a problem in labs than it is in basset so If you are looking for a genetic reason you scorn is better reserved for lab breeders.

Bassets are dwarf breed and the type of dwarfism they have also contributes to more massive bone size and therefore joints. The realitively short limp length couple with relative to any other breed masive joint size create very low joint stress compared to other breeds. So even will poor conformation a bassets in general have very little joint problems compared to other dogs, especially arthritis.
 
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