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Stanley, our 1 year old basset, is showing signs of seperation anxiety. Let me give you some back story. We got him a year ago st the same time we brought my grandpa in to care for him. Mom gave him her bedroom and she started sleeping on the couch. After awhile grandpa got a hospital bed and slept downstairs. My step dad is in the basement about 90% of the time, which the dogs have access to. In February my grandpa passed and mom went into the hospital. After coming home from the hospital mom continued to sleep downstairs. So now if mom tries to sleep upstairs Stanley goes insane. He just continues to bark until someone goes to him. What can we do? We can't let the dogs out of their area as they just will not get the hang of not peeing in the house thing. Any advice would be great. We need a good night sleep!
 

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Crate alongside, or near the bed of whoever is going to have him in with them. Bassets hate being on their own - they are a pack animal and if the canine pack isn't there, they bond with their humans. However, you say 'dogs', plural, so presumably he does have other dogs to be with? Unfortunately Bassets are rather like elephants - never forget, so if he's used to being with a human, you may well find it's impossible for him to be otherwise. But again, try a crate - at least he shouldn't be wandering around and messing.


And for that, check he doesn't have a medical problem because by a year, he should be able to hold through the night assuming he goes to bed by 11 pm, having emptied immediately before, and somebody lets him out by 7 am.


To get clean indoors - praise a lot when they empty outside, correct ONLY in the act or they won't know why you are angry and clean up mistakes properly so there's no over-marking. I defy anybody not to be able to housetrain provided there's not some medical problem going on.
 

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I agree with Franksmum, use a crate while working on housebreaking. TAKE him outside, reward him when he does his thing. When he's inside he must be CLOSELY supervised (eyes on the dog) or leashed to you or crated so he doesn't have the chance to make a mistake. Bassets are very intelligent but they are creatures of habit and the more you let them practice a wrong behavior the harder it is to stop.
 

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I am still waiting for my hound (waiting list is 5 months T.T) so I can't speak for the breed. But I have had many dogs, your problem applies to most dogs really. You seem to have raised your pup in a way where it's constantly around people, so if your mum sleeps upstairs now he will need to be alone. It's not something he's used to so it's not surprising that he is barking at night.


So you need to train him to settle when he's alone, and since he's not toilet trained, you probably need to toilet train him if he's an indoor dog.


As suggested by FranksMum, crate training is a good option for you right now and it can address both issues. There are heaps of articles on crate training if you Google it, but here's a link that came with my crate if you are too lazy to search


dog crate training guide
 

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I am still waiting for my hound (waiting list is 5 months T.T) so I can't speak for the breed. But I have had many dogs, your problem applies to most dogs really.

Hah - as you will discover once you have your Basset, the Basset, and many other hounds, are NOT like other dogs and as said, hate being alone. Of course there are some things that are less unique to the breed (and this is a unique breed, in so many ways) and can be corrected by 'common methods', but you will have to adapt your methods to fit your Basset, or you'll hit a brick wall. Never forget, if you hit 'stubborn' you have to change your approach to training - always making what you want seem, to them, to be what THEY want.


Have fun! And HAVE PATIENCE! (Both of you!!)
 

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always making what you want seem, to them, to be what THEY want.
Unlike the so called easy to train breed basset hounds like many breeds are not biddable. That is they are never motivated to do something to please you. The need to be paid for any work they do if you want them to repeat it in the future see https://suzanneclothier.com/article/hard-to-train/ "In a world of trainers who often prefer dogs who don't ask many questions, dogs who bend easily to the control and demands of rather arbitrary rules and regulations, there are far too many breeds who have a reputation of being stubborn, tough to train, willful. What this often means is that this "difficult dog" is an intelligent dog who asks too many questions for the average trainer. Such a canine mind is not automatically compliant, and comes equipped with its own view of the world and its own definitions of what constitutes meaningful, enjoyable activities. This is not to say these dogs are not willing - one of the great charms of these breeds is their keen interest in life and in people. If given the right answers to "Why?" and "Why not?" many of these dogs can be not just agreeable but downright brilliant in the execution of a task."
 

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..... in other words, Bassets have minds of their own and don't automatically react to commands (and almost 'never' when on a hot scent LOL ). The key to being able to train without hitting a brick wall, is to find the key to unlock their brain...... and it was as bad, if not worse, with our Whippet, early days.
 
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