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Hey, haven't been on in a while, since getting older miley is beginning to get a lot of sebaceous cysts some being quite large,.we have had a few burst managed to keep clean & had no sign of infection! Not going to get removed as she is nearly 9 now & they don't bother her, just wondering are they renowned for getting these as they get older? Would you have them removed?
 

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Some can be prone to these - we have had some who had loads and others none - even with litter mates. One girl we had kept getting these and at first, we had them removed but after a while, unless they were in a difficult place, or grew big, we left well alone. Her brother had none but he had a finer coat than she did, more like his dad. Our much missed Frankie had loads and we didn't touch them. Some could have been a nasty but what we didn't know, didn't hurt. Towards his end, he had one that ruptured and refused to heal, and then another which looked alarming but again we left alone.

It's up to you (and on your vet's advice provided he's not money hungry) whether you have them removed, but personally, again unless they are in a difficult place, my advice would be to leave well alone. Frankie had a heart murmur too which reallyi ruled out non essential general anaesthetics.
 

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Add - Your vet may want to do a fine needle aspirate to check that they are harmless.
Add - Your vet may want to do a fine needle aspirate to check that they are harmless.
Some can be prone to these - we have had some who had loads and others none - even with litter mates. One girl we had kept getting these and at first, we had them removed but after a while, unless they were in a difficult place, or grew big, we left well alone. Her brother had none but he had a finer coat than she did, more like his dad. Our much missed Frankie had loads and we didn't touch them. Some could have been a nasty but what we didn't know, didn't hurt. Towards his end, he had one that ruptured and refused to heal, and then another which looked alarming but again we left alone.

It's up to you (and on your vet's advice provided he's not money hungry) whether you have them removed, but personally, again unless they are in a difficult place, my advice would be to leave well alone. Frankie had a heart murmur too which reallyi ruled out non essential general anaesthetics.
[/QUOT
Some can be prone to these - we have had some who had loads and others none - even with litter mates. One girl we had kept getting these and at first, we had them removed but after a while, unless they were in a difficult place, or grew big, we left well alone. Her brother had none but he had a finer coat than she did, more like his dad. Our much missed Frankie had loads and we didn't touch them. Some could have been a nasty but what we didn't know, didn't hurt. Towards his end, he had one that ruptured and refused to heal, and then another which looked alarming but again we left alone.

It's up to you (and on your vet's advice provided he's not money hungry) whether you have them removed, but personally, again unless they are in a difficult place, my advice would be to leave well alone. Frankie had a heart murmur too which reallyi ruled out non essential general anaesthetics.
[/Q
Some can be prone to these - we have had some who had loads and others none - even with litter mates. One girl we had kept getting these and at first, we had them removed but after a while, unless they were in a difficult place, or grew big, we left well alone. Her brother had none but he had a finer coat than she did, more like his dad. Our much missed Frankie had loads and we didn't touch them. Some could have been a nasty but what we didn't know, didn't hurt. Towards his end, he had one that ruptured and refused to heal, and then another which looked alarming but again we left alone.

It's up to you (and on your vet's advice provided he's not money hungry) whether you have them removed, but personally, again unless they are in a difficult place, my advice would be to leave well alone. Frankie had a heart murmur too which reallyi ruled out non essential general anaesthetics.
Thank you for reply, my vet did want to remove them, but as you say iwanted to leave well alone, as they get older it's awful watching them recover from anesthetic, not that she has ever been under only to be spayed, but i didn't own her then. So sorry to hear about your Frankie. When i first got miley and joined here i read a lot of your good advice to understand more of the bassets way of thinking, i also added a bulldog as everyone mentioned they like company.. best thing i did they are great friends.
 

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If your dog has a heart murmur, you need to weigh the need for removing the cyst against the risk of complications while he is under.

Unrelated surgery requiring anesthesia might be an opportunity for you to include cystectomy. For example, when my late Olivia was undergoing teeth surgery, we took the opportunity to have a couple of cysts removed.


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only really good reason to remove 1 they are interfering with function ie walking etc they keep exploding, Just had 3 removed from an 11 year old because of the onging problem of they keep exploding which irrtates the surrounding skin and 2 another dog keeps licking at them so they can't heal.
 
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