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Ruby again has the bacteria pyroderma and this is an on and off thing for months! She's got one of those nasty red things on her toe AGAIN and she is AGAIN on her antibiotics twice a day.

I'm feeling very sad for her health and how sick she's been getting.She seems to only do fine on antibitiotics!!!! But she gets secondary yeast infections from the antibitotics.

Any idea on how to get rid of the pyroderma she is experiencing? It can't be healthy for her to be dealing with all of this day in and day out.

Thanx,
Janice and little Ruby
 

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I have no advice but I am very sorry Ruby is feeling bad. Good wishes and Healing drool from Copper,Dolly and Patty.
 

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When our dogs take antibiotics I give them a big glob of Dannon plain yogurt with each meal. This helps to keep the environment in their intestines as it should be while on the drugs. It might help with her yeast problem-
 

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Ruby again has the bacteria pyroderma and this is an on and off thing for months! She's got one of those nasty red things on her toe AGAIN and she is AGAIN on her antibiotics twice a day.

I'm feeling very sad for her health and how sick she's been getting.She seems to only do fine on antibitiotics!!!! But she gets secondary yeast infections from the antibitotics.

Any idea on how to get rid of the pyroderma she is experiencing? It can't be healthy for her to be dealing with all of this day in and day out.

Thanx,
Janice and little Ruby
[/b]
1. has the bacteria been cultured and test to be sure it has not developed a resistent to the particular antibiotic you are using

2. pyroderma may be a secondary condition resulting from a more primary condition that is not being treated. Until the primary condition is controlled the pyroderma will keep reappering. Some possible but not all primary conditions that can lead to pyroderma include allergies, seborrhea aong with more serious auto-immune diseases. In cases that recure it is often a good idea to consult a specialist in veterinary dermatology who are better trained to deal with finding and curing the primary cause.

list of Veterinary Dermatologists

see Pyoderma in canines

How to treat pyoderma

The foremost advice is that if your pet is rubbing itself raw and suppurating from a wound, go and see your veterinarian. However in nine out of ten cases this isn't the case. Because pyoderma tends to be a chronic disease many clients are used to recognising the symptoms and can manage the condition at home provided they use the correct medications. Follow the rules below:

Remember each type of pyoderma requires a different type and level of treatment.
Treat early, as soon as your dog shows symptoms.
Look for a primary cause.
Blame fleas every time unless proven otherwise.
Question why the skin condition may be allowing secondary pyoderma to occur.
Think about changing diet to a hypoallergenic diet.
Use an EFA such as Viacutan to improve skin nutrition and reduce inflammation.
Ensure that the skin is well moisturized and clean with a product such as Humilac
Cool 'hot spots' and areas of inflammation with Dermacool
Treat surface pyoderma with twice weekly shampoos with Etiderm
Superficial and deep pyodermas will require the shampoo Paxcutol
Prevent reoccurrence with healthy skin maintenance including regular shampooing with Sebocalm [/b]
Pyoderma
Pyoderma is the second most common inflammatory skin disease of dogs. Flea allergy is most common and often complicated by secondary pyoderma.
The major predisposing factors for pyoderma in the US are allergic dermatitis and chronic use of glucocorticoids.

...The prognosis (outcome) for animals with pyoderma is variable. If the underlying cause is identified and effectively treated, the pyoderma may resolve successfully. Otherwise, the pyoderma may not respond well to treatment or it may recur frequently.[/b]
Canine superficial pyoderma: the good, the bad and the ugly
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thank you for all of your help. She's seen the regular vet but it has been cultured. I have to bring her in next week for a longer appt (they had 6 emergencies.....) and I'll find out what's what then. I'll also get some plain yogurt for her; thanx for that.

I sure hope she doesn't have autoimmune diseases; as I have 4 and if she does, maybe it **is** indeed hereditary.

Thanx again!

Janice
 

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Sorry to hear about Ruby having health issues yet again! If Ruby does not like the yogurt, you can try giving her an acidolphilus supplement; acidolphilus is the good yeast in yogurt. I take them whenever I am on antibotics to prevent any secondary infections. Also, if you choose to get yogurt, make sure it has active cultures in it or else it will not do any good. Jackie sends healing drool to Ruby!!! Get well soon and stay well!
 
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