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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I know there's at least one foundation around that does research on pet and wild animal diseases--Morris Animal Foundation. But I seem to recall that there is another group doing research on diseases relevant to Bassets. Am I correct, and if I am, who is it, and what are their current projects?
Thanks
 

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AKC/CHF (Canine Health Foundation) solicits grant proposals and presents them to parent clubs. BHCA is currently funding, along with CHF, a glaucoma study and a thrombopathia study.

Here are the descriptions of the grants from CHF's website.

Active Grant No.  2245: Screening Candidate Genes as Potential Cause of Basset Hound  Thrombopathia


Mary  K. Boudreaux, DVM, PhD; Auburn University


Sponsor: Basset  Hound Club of America


Abstract: Bassett  Hound Thrombopathia is an inherited platelet defect that has plagued the  breed since its first description by Johnstone and Lotz in 1979.   At the present time, diagnosis of the defect requires the animal(s)  be brought to one of the few existing specialized veterinary platelet  function laboratories in the country.   Although platelet studies do identify affected dogs with clarity,  unambiguous identification of carriers is difficult.   Identification of the genetic cause would greatly facilitate  elimination of this defect from the breed by allowing clear identification  of carrier and affected animals without the necessity of having the dog be  on the premises of the facility.  Many  candidate genes need to be sequenced and evaluated to begin to make  progress toward identification of the cause.   This study not only would potentially identify the genetic cause of  Basset Hound Thrombopathia but would also add valuable information to the  database on the canine genome.  As  information on the canine genome continues to expand, veterinarians will  be better positioned to identify genetic causes of disease, which will  ultimately benefit all breeds.


 


Active Grant No.  2291: Canine Lens Luxation and Glaucoma


Gary  S. Johnson, DVM, PhD; University of Missouri, Columbia


Sponsors:  American Sealyham Terrier Club, Basset Hound Club of America, Bull Terrier  Welfare Foundation, Dandie Dinmont Terrier Club of America, Dandie Dinmont  Terrier Trust Fund, Jack Russell Terrier Research Foundation, Miniature  Bull Terrier Club of America, Petit Basset Griffon Vendeen Club of  America, Tibetan Terrier Club of America, Welsh Terrier Club of America


Abstract: Heritable  lens luxation, if not treated promptly, will induce secondary glaucoma.  In addition, heritable primary glaucoma can cause secondary  lens luxation.  Since it is  not always known whether lens luxation or glaucoma is the primary disease,  we believe it is rational to study both diseases together.   One or the other of these diseases is responsible for loss of sight  in the Basset Hound, Border Collie, Dandie Dinmont Terrier, Jack Russell  Terrier, Miniature Bull Terrier, Petit Basset Griffon Vendeen, Sealyham  Terrier, Tibetan Terrier, Welsh Springer Spaniel, and Welsh Terrier.  We are attempting to produce DNA marker assays that will  identify dogs with the mutant gene responsible for lens luxation and  glaucoma.  Early  identification of these dogs would enable dog owners and their  veterinarians to instigate measures to preserve their dogs’ sight and to  adjust breeding practices to minimize or eradicate the disease in their  breeds.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks, Betsy. This is just what I was looking for.
 
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