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We recently got a fifteen-month-old Basset female. She is very pretty and seems to be a perfect fit for our family. Our three little girls love her very much...and she seems to be rather fond of them, as well.

I brought her in for a pedicure and the worker commented on the degree her legs were bent to. Just how steeply angled and splayed can they safely be? I'm honestly horrified that I might have bought an animal who will have to be rehomed because our family can't afford thousands in vet bills!

Her feet are always pointed almost ninety degrees outward. It does not always seem that her weight is evenly balanced on the whole foot, but more toward the front toes.

Please, let me know what you think. Thanks!
 

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I would bring her into the vet for an opinion - they may end up wanting to do xrays. It is a common problem in poorly bred basset hounds and many of the dogs I have fostered have a similar issue in their front legs. Only one has ever come into the rescue I work with in the past 5 years that actually needed surgery for front leg deformities.

I adopted my Bogie when he was around that age and he is bow-legged, so his are rotated the other way and looks like he has "elbows" sticking out instead of the "elbows" touching each other as in your dog. I was afraid of the same thing you are - a whole lotta vet bills. The vets I brought him to recommended I keep him on the skinny side to limit the amount of weight he is carrying. The vet said as long as it isn't causing him severe pain, there was no point of fixing his legs - he can walk, run, jump, play just like any other dog. That isn't to say he moves perfectly normal - he definitely compensates his weight, to run straight ahead he runs at an angle (if that makes sense) and he doesn't seem to lift his front legs up as much as other dogs so when he walks, his nails sometimes scrape against the ground during the step. But he isn't in any pain and gets along just fine. They also warned that he would likely get arthritis in those joints earlier in the life and that giving him glucosamine certainly couldn't hurt.

Again, I would take her to the vet. There isn't a clear cut line between this angle is too severe and needs surgery vs manageable, and your vet should be able to observe the way she walks, feel her legs, etc and better make the decision.
 

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Spencer's legs are bowed pretty good. When he was a pup, the vet said the only way to fix them would be an expensive, painful surgery. I opted not to do that. Spencer's vet said the same thing Mahna's vet said - that keeping his weight under control would be important, and that Spencer would likely have arthritis in his legs when he got old. Well, he's old now (almost 14 yrs) and aside from some occasional stumbling, he is just fine. He is able to run & play & does not seem to have any discomfort. He is a smaller Basset - 45-50 lbs, and weight has never been an issue for him. He's too hyper - runs it off!
 

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Awww... poor Maggie...:( she looks happy though and I'm sure she'll be able to get around until she's a good age, but try to not let her get too heavy! I agree that it's partly due to poor breeding, also not enough good food whilst growing and probably also due to people walking Basset pups when they are not fully developed, because their legs and feet are not 'constructed' in the way of other dogs.

Basset legs/feet have a series of 'plates' that take a long time to knit together and if walked more than a few minutes/short distance before they are ten to twelve months of age, these plates can get damaged and maybe this leads to malformation and ending up like Queen Anne legs.

Bassets are very heavily boned dogs and need good nourishment and care whilst developing and should not go up and down stairs either as their weight is too much on those little front legs when going downstairs....

I think if Maggie gets around OK like she is now, it's best to avoid surgery and lining vets' pockets and just watch her weight!

Edit:: Here's a Basset with 'Queen Anne legs' who seems lively enough.... he looks quite small built so he's probably quite light weight-wise and the legs maybe don't bother him like they would on a big heavy hound!
 

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you got two seperate things going on. the First is the pointing of the feet east and west oposed to north and south ie fiddle fronted because the shape of the legs and chest resemble a violin/fiddle. This rarely ever causes a problem in bassets, The second is the elbow out in front of the wrist joint the is referred to as knuckling over. It happens irregardless of how the feet point they are two seperate issues. Knuckling over is a disqualifing fault in the basset breed standard i.e. bigger fault that ]n being fiddled fronted, but no basset is winning a comformation contest with either. Knuckling over while not likely to cause a problem is more likely to do so than being fiddlefronted


Knuckling Over : A fault in regards to many breed standards where the weight of the body forces the wrist joint to flex forward due to a faulty structure of the joint.

Mariah

Pehaps the best agility basset ever certainly in the top three ever is as fiddledfronted as your dog, but abscent is the degree of knuckling over .



IMHO if the dog is moving well and showing no pain going the x-ray vet exam route is opening a can of worm there is no certain in any diagnose about the potential for arthritis or future problems. Most vets do not have enough experince with the unique orthopeadics of a basset to make a qualified opinion, if you decide to further investigate save you money an consult with a vet that specialize in orthopeadics and has working knowledge of bassets in particular.

As noted above especial in basset all orthopeadic abnormalities are exacerbated by being overweight, That said the vast majority of bassets are overwieght so much so that a correct weight basset is often mistaked for emaciated.

see corpulent Canines for how to determine the correct weight for a particular dog

also keep in mind even when using pody charts and other aids most owners ten to underestimate how fat their own dogs are.
Purina® Study ]Confirms Link Between Body Fat and Chronic Health Conditions
Other Purina research found that most owners couldn't accurately assess their dogs' body conditions. When owner and expert scores were compared, only 28 percent of owners characterized their pets as above ideal body condition, while 79 percent of the experts scored those same animals to be above ideal body condition. Dr. Larson says this gap is serious because pet owners are not likely to recognize that their pets are overweight and even moderate excess body fat can lead to problems.
some slim trim basset to get a feel for it
Mariah 42 lbs

Toughy 48 lbs

Macey 50 lbs
 

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I agree with MikeyT... if your Basset is happy and gets around, leave the X-Rays alone. Two very good breeders/friends of mine have always said that the majority of vets do not have enough experience with Basset Hounds and my own vets have told me that over the years they have never seen many Bassets (mostly have been mine)and never have they had a set of twins like I have. My pair create much amusement when they go in - people in the waiting room fuss them and they love it and one of them sits up for ages like a meercat and loves the attention...

What a poser... she does it all the time, from about 6 months old.... even when we're out walking if someone stops to speak to them! :)


They go in the vets mostly just to be weighed and when they were spayed together and checked afterwards. The vet I have always tried to see with my dogs (I have another dog and lost my dear old Basset last year) loves my Bassets and tells me to call in for her to see them if her car is outside and she makes a fuss of them and gives them treats!!!!

I have digressed.... just wanted to agree with Mikey -- don't bother with x-rays angeloftheprairie, unless your Basset struggles to get around! She's lovely and I hope you'll have as much enjoyment as we get from ours! Bassets are just the best dogs in the world!!
 

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Thank you all so much for the information! Maggie does move just fine. She runs and plays like a champ. She is right were she should be in weight and we plan to really keep an eye on that. She does honestly look skinny compared to what would be considered a "normal"...but I know that she's healthy. It would be my guess that her former owner was uninformed about the walking and probably enjoyed taking her out on walks a lot last summer! She came from the breeder, who really ought to have known better, before that. Too bad, really. But we'll make sure she's properly cared for and doesn't put on any extra poundage. Thanks again!
 

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Thank you all so much for the information! Maggie does move just fine. She runs and plays like a champ. She is right were she should be in weight and we plan to really keep an eye on that. She does honestly look skinny compared to what would be considered a "normal"...but I know that she's healthy. It would be my guess that her former owner was uninformed about the walking and probably enjoyed taking her out on walks a lot last summer! She came from the breeder, who really ought to have known better, before that. Too bad, really. But we'll make sure she's properly cared for and doesn't put on any extra poundage. Thanks again!
But as we all know... there are breeders who are very caring and there are 'breeders' who are not caring and do it for money....!!!

There are good ones like my two friends who breed only occasionally to get a new dog for showing, and are very selective with who they sell pups to, and provide printed leaflets and tell you how to feed, walk and care for your pup etc etc and are on the end of a phone for any help... and there are those who just keep on breeding for the money and don't care who they sell to, which is why there are unwanted pups because people lose patience with the stubborn nature of Bassets!!! :eek:

It isn't your fault Maggie's legs are like they are and I hope you have many years of fun with her as she looks cute! :D
 

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You have a lovely basset, with feet to be envied by all ballerinas! LOL Perhaps she could have a job advertising ballet products.

I have to agree with all who have said leave it be if its not bothering her. Weight and appropriate exercise are important too.

My basset foster has ankles that "pop" from straight to bent. When he arrived it was constant when he was at rest, standing or sitting. After two weeks of exercise on demand and resulting weight loss I noticed today a huge change. Not only was he not "popping" constantly but he was standing with better alignment at the shoulders and hip. The result seems to be a lesser degree of bend at the ankle which looks alot more natural and comfortable.
 

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It would be my guess that her former owner was uninformed about the walking and probably enjoyed taking her out on walks a lot last summer
Walking has nothing to do with the problem, most conformational problems are congentital/genetic in origin with a few more from nutrition in which case overnutrition or suplementation is more likely the cause than under. Trauma is way down on the list and not likely at all to sustain trauma from walking. Being too over protectective is more of a problem leading to a overweightness and a lack of muscle mass. low impact exercise is way more protective of poor conformation than the it is likely to cause a problem It is essential for back problem and hip displasia.

Bassets are supose to be athletic. it takes an athelete to chase bunnies in the field for 8 hours. Unfortunately the myth of bassets being couch potatoes keep getting spread. They are not couch potatoes because they want to be but are because they are more tollerant of a lack of exercise than many breeds and the owners are more prone not to exercise them or look for "low energy" breeds
 

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Hi all, I'm new to this... I have an 8 month old basset Dewi, bless him he's going through the wars a bit. He had 'cherry eye' which he has had a small op on to remove it, they gave him met calm and eye drops, 2 days after he had vomiting and diarrhoea, starting on Saturday, this morning he has had diorrhea through the night and it has blood in it. He seems fine within himself, probable a bit more quiet this morning but he's had a rough night.
He is also bow legged and due to him going under anaesthetic last week they said he should have an x ray to look at his leg. The x ray showed that one of his growth plates has fused to the other making one bone grow and the other to stop growing, causing the bone which is growing to arch. They have recommended surgery to straighten the bone. This will avoid arthritis later in life as the joints are out of place.
I'm worries that its unnecessary surgery but one that has been recommended?!
 

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Do you have a photo of him where he's facing the camera so his legs can be seen? There are some very knowledgable people here who will be better able to advise you if they can see the problem.
 

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He is also bow legged and due to him going under anaesthetic last week they said he should have an x ray to look at his leg. The x ray showed that one of his growth plates has fused to the other making one bone grow and the other to stop growing, causing the bone which is growing to arch. They have recommended surgery to straighten the bone. This will avoid arthritis later in life as the joints are out of place.
I'm worries that its unnecessary surgery but one that has been recommended?!
He's probably a bit loose because of the anaesthetic - but if this continues, get back to them

Secondly, this premature closure of the growth plates. I have a basset here who I bought, from a good breeder (!) at 4 months, with the intention of showing him. He started limping (front), so I immediately went to Pano. My bone-specialist vet checked him over, and decided that as he was also not really moving well behind either, we really needed to do full x-ray, front to back. His hips and elbows - fine. Wobblers was ruled out (and I'd gone there too). What he did find was prem.closure of the growth plates, ulna, both sides. And already his front had started turning, much as it was 'even' :rolleyes: We talked about surgery (he was 7 - 8 months by then) but he warned me that it could take more than one surgery to get these bones properly sorted out. He wasn't in any severe pain even if obviously feeling something as he was lame (more than could be said for me as it was pretty obvious that any show career had gone out the window :( ) and the full x-ray plates had cost me a fortune. This growth plate closure thing isn't unknown in the breed by a long way ........ but I don't think was helped in his case by being fed a product with what I considered a very high protein level - too much, too fast.

The message is, he's now 3 years and although bowed, his front isn't causing him any problems (and he's no way as affected as the one at the beginning of this thread). I'm glad we left well alone (he's had enough other problems!!!)

If your hound isn't in trouble at the moment, I'd not be in too much of a hurry to go for surgery. Just my opinion.:huh:
 

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Our girl, Sophie, has legs that would make a seal jealous, but they don't slow her down one bit. She's still active, happy, and gives no indication they bother her in the slightest. We keep her weight well-managed, nails trimmed, and lift her in/out of the car, but our house has stairs which she charges up and down without a hitch. Her left leg has a tendency to 'pop' into a more knuckled over position if she's sitting, but she doesn't seem to care or be bothered by it.
 
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