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I have an old hound, not sure of his exact age because I rescued him. A month or so ago, he started limping on his back leg. Just wondering what everyone can share about bassets and their hips. I have normally heard of potential back problems if the hound gets too heavy. My dog is not overweight, so that isn't the problem with his hip. Thanks.
 

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Limping can be caused by so many things- have your vet take a look and get a diagnosis so you'll know the best way to treat this- if he's limping he's in pain.
 

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I have an old hound, not sure of his exact age because I rescued him. A month or so ago, he started limping on his back leg. Just wondering what everyone can share about bassets and their hips. I have normally heard of potential back problems if the hound gets too heavy. My dog is not overweight, so that isn't the problem with his hip. Thanks.[/b]

50% of all dogs are overweight and the percentage of basset is even higher. IMHO what most consider a good normal weight for basset in fact is overweight. A Basset's dwarfism causes the disc in the back to be come hard and brittle, much more prone to rupture than non-dwarf breeds. Being overweight makes the problem more likely but is not causual, and normal and underweight basset can have a problem too. see:

Canine Intervertebral Disk Disease

The hips of the average basset are not as good as they should be. While you do not normally associate Hip dysplasia with basset hound on average more suffer from loose hip joint than many breeds highly linked to it. as a matter of fact of 150 breed, they rank 12th in having the worst hips: see Hip Dysplasia Statistics
However the large size of their bones and the shortness of the legs minimize the effect of the problem. So fewer seem to have pain associated with the condition, but arthritis in the his is a real posibility as well.

Another orthopeadic condition of the rear legs associated with basset hounds is patellar Luxation. In this case the limping is general on again of again depending on the knee cap placement
Luxating Patella
In certain breeds that have extremely short legs such as the Basset Hound or Dachshund, patellar luxation is thought to be secondary to the abnormal shape of the femur and tibia. The curvatures of the bones in these breeds work in conjunction with the forces of the quadriceps muscles to displace the patella to the inside. Please do not misunderstand – not all members of these breeds are affected with patellar luxation, only a small portion.[/b]

As said above the only way to know the cause and therefore the most efective treatment is to have an othropeadic exam.
 

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Depending on where you live, Lyme disease is a good possibility. I just finished treating the second of my hounds to have it this fall/winter. I don't test for Lyme. just put them on Birdbiotic ( doxycycline for birds) and if they improve, I continue for 30 days. Also Glucosamine can be very effective in older hounds
 
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