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but I've been reading the forum and a couple of people have mentioned that bassets do well on large breed food. Why is this the case?
It is not a matter of basset doing well on it it is more that basset are large breed dogs on short legs. The have the same bone developmental problems pano. ocd etc that are common in large and giant breed dogs., so from a developmental point it is better for them. The main difference between regular puppy food and large breed is Large breed is reduced in caloric content. so it is a bit easier to keep the dogs weight down. Most developmental issuse are cause by too much growth, this is not coause by too high protein as one thought but simply to many calories consumed. You want to keep the puppy on the skinny side. Secondly is calcium and calcium an phosporus ratio. In humans we are taught that growning kids need lods of calcium to grow strong bones. However in dogs puppies do not have the mechanism full develpoded to regulate blood calcium level. High levels of calcium lead to abnormal bone growth and actual weaker bones. so large breed puppies food have lower calcium levels and lower calcium to phosporous ratio.


below are some links on these issues

The Growth OF Large and Giant Breed Puppies

Optimal feeding of large breed puppies

Dog Diet Do's and Don’t's
According to Dr. Tony Buffington, Professor of Clinical Nutrition, Ohio State University College of Veterinary Medicine, your puppy can be fed a regimen of specific caloric intake compared to his body condition score (BCS), using a simple one to five scale, from overly thin to obese. Using manufacturer feeding recommendations as an initial starting point, feed your puppy to a score of two and maintain this weight until he's fully grown. Feed whatever amount is necessary to maintain a BCS of two during the growth period, realizing that dogs have varying growth rates and activity levels. Once his adult stature is achieved, you may allow him to reach a score of three.


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2 = Thin - Ribs easily palpated and may be visible with no palpable fat. Tops of lumbar vertebrae visible. Pelvic bones less prominent. Obvious waist and abdominal tuck.
3 = Moderate - Ribs palpable without excess fat covering. Abdomen tucked up when viewed from side.​
 

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Hickory actually doesn't eat much lately
dogs go through growth spurts so the need for caloric content changes constantly. A reduction in eating is more likely an indication than this because a hungry basset will eat just about anything. the only way to judge the amount to feed a puppy is adjusting food amount based on the dogs body condition feed more if too thing and cut back if putting on too much weight. there is no simple formula to follow.
 
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