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Hi all, I'm new here and to owning a basset hound. I have a 15 week old basset (Hickory), who I got at 9 weeks old. Anyway, he is remarkably good with house and crate training, but he bites so much when he plays. It is never fear or anger biting, but just playing. However, sometimes he gets really excited and bites pretty hard. I have tried all the tricks from yelping to walking away to yelling. Walking away is rough because he then jumps up and starts biting at my pants, and has already ripped a few of them on the bottom. After talking to multiple people, they say that I should just be patient and he will eventually grow out of it. I was just wondering if anybody else has had similar experiences with basset pups and could help reassure me that this terrible habit will fade. P.S. The only thing that really gets his attention to stop is shaking a tin can full of change, but even then he eventually goes back to it.
 

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First, welcome! Hickory is really cute! And his name makes me want to BBQ something :) I like it.

My basset Annie is 6 yrs old and when she was a pup she bit in exactly the same manner as you describe Hickory. I tried all the things you tried and she did all the same things including jumping and putting holes in my clothes. Indeed, she grew out of it and is the most gentle ball of fluff ever. This may not be the case for everyone. There may be some folks who come along and have actual advice to give lol, I just wanted to share what happened for Annie :)
 

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ohhh hickory is cute
does he like southern girls?

hey annie, just fyi, in memphis, BBQ is a noun not a verb hahaha
my he human uses apple wood. another cute name for a houndie tho.
 

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Oh heck Ralph...errrr ummm...Esther :) My bad...I meant I wanna eat some BBQ! We gotta go south...I bet that apple wood smells YUMMY.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Its good to hear from someone whos been in the same situation with the same breed. How old was your girl when she finally grew out of that phase?
 

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Been there, done that...doing it again. Molly was a severe biter until her big dog teeth came in. She's so good now at almost 1 year old. Winston, my dear mischievous 5 month old, is in the biting stage now. Big dog teeth are starting to come in. Really, patience and persistence in discouraging biting (give him a toy to bite) are what you need. It DOES get better...and bonus, you get to buy new clothes. I did :)

Cute pup...bear with him, it'll be worth it.
 

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Flash is 12 weeks old and quite the biter while playing also! What has worked best for me is saying ow! really sharp sounding-but not yelling. IF it gets yelled, he gets more riled up which makes him bite more. Usually when I say ow! he will lay his head down for a second and usually ends up giving me kisses a few seconds later.

I know that kennels are not to be used for punishment but I also read that IF the biting gets out of hand and walking away doesn't work, put them in there. I did do that a few times, when he was biting at me hard or the kids. But only for a minute or so, enough to walk away for a few seconds. Then we would let him back out and he would be sweet lil pup all over again.

His biting still continues but he is learning to bite nicer-more like just mouthing my hand if that makes sense? Good luck to you!
 

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sometimes he gets really excited and bites pretty hard. I have tried all the tricks from yelping to walking away to yelling. Walking away is rough because he then jumps up and starts biting at my pants, and has already ripped a few of them on the bottom. After talking to multiple people, they say that I should just be patient and he will eventually grow out of it
Yes they out grow nipping but it is an important stage that you actual do not want to teach them not to bite but rather not to bite hard. It is criticle you teach this at a puppy because attempting to teach it latter is unreliable it is the most important thing you can teach a dog, don't believe me and see Eddie bites people

Bite Inhibition

Biting Pant Legs & Ankles

Keep in mind there is not one method that works with all dogs. There are dog when you give a high pitched yelp will bite even harder. Sometimes using a lower tone or another distracting sound works. As you see from the biting pants leg link it again is normal dogging behavior (normal not to be confused with acceptable) some time simply ignoring the dog turn your back stop interacting etc. is enough. but the most important thing is to be consistent.

Also when we say puppies out grow it we are at first talking about puppy nipping. Which is heavily play based but there are two other biting/nipping phases that are fast approaching in the 4-5 month old is when the baby teeth start falling out and adult teeth start comming in. the dog needs appropriate toys to chew on and taugh what is and is not appropriate. and at around 10 months of age the last of the mollars erupt starting a whole new need to chew phase as well.


The only thing that really gets his attention to stop is shaking a tin can full of change,
While most people will telly thing like this is punishing the dog it really is not as evidence the dog reengages in the behavior. By definition at least as behaviorist define it punishment deminishes the likelihood of a behavior occuring. Skaker cans, say no etc really do not punish. The are best described as distruptive stimuli. That is the interupt what the dog is doing. They give you then the ourtunity to use something more powerfull than punishment. that is to reward the behavior you do want. Puppy is chewing on somthing inappropriate. Shaker can stops the puppy. You give puppy appropriate chew and reward the puppy for chewing it instead. Without creating an oppurtunity to reward appropriate behavior a shaker can or any other disruptive stimuli will not change behavior.

When the dog or puppy is highly excited it is in a state that it cognative ( think) state is shut off and it is running on emotion. It becomes impossible to teach the dog anything What you want to too is before the dog gets overly excited is to stop the play before then and rengage the dog when calmer. This give you much mor opurtunity to reward the proper behavior with additional play which is the end is more successful than trying to punish inappropriate behavior.

Self Control and Overstimulation
The brain operates from two sides
- the limbic side and the cognitive side.

The limbic side is your emotional self.
The cognitive side is your thinking self.

Emotional reactions originate in the limbic part of the brain, which allows for fast-acting response to events based on quick impressions. Survival depends on quickness of response — allowing you to notice and duck when you catch a glimpse of a fast-moving object about to fall on your head.

Limbic over-rides cognitive. When an animal is in a state of adrenalin arousal from fear, defense, excitement or just plain sensory overload, he not only doesn't listen, he can't hear you. It does no good to repeat "sit sit sit" to a dog who is on emotional overload. He isn't thinking, he is simply reacting to the stimuli around him. He must tune-in and re-connect with you before he will be able to hear what you have to say. You must be able to get his attention first, before you tell him what you would like him to do.
This is also where the shaker can or any other disruptive stimuli is helpful by stoping the over excited behavior it creates the environment you can teach the dog an appropriate behavior.
 

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I know that kennels are not to be used for punishment
That is the problem with absolutism it is rarely correct. If one were to use a kennel as "punishment a time out removal of attention etc is fine if the dog is comforatable in the crate. If however you are trying to crate train the dog (teaching the dog the crate is a wonderful place to be) using it in this way will undermine the crate training. There is no absolutes and it comes down to what is more useful for you and the dog at the time, knowing the possible consequence either action or inaction can lead to.
 

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I like to get down and roll around and wrestle with my boys. Both are very good at knowing how much they can bite. When they were both young I would let the have my arm or hand, and when it got to be too hard, I just gave them a very firm no. Whenever I do that the bite instantly turns into a gum or a barrage of kisses.
 

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His biting still continues but he is learning to bite nicer-more like just mouthing my hand if that makes sense?
Both mine have very good bite inhibition, thankfully, and I try to reinforce that. It's hard to tell sometimes, though...puppy teeth are sharp, even when the puppy is trying to be good and not bite too hard.
 

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I just bought my 8 teething puppies ropes that are knotted.When they start on my thumbs and toes I place a rope in their mouth.They readily chew the rope rather than me.
 

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I just bought my 8 teething puppies ropes that are knotted.When they start on my thumbs and toes I place a rope in their mouth.They readily chew the rope rather than me.
I forgot that part-we do "exchange" a toy to flash in order to get arms/feet/legs/whatever out of the way of his mouth too.

Our biggest issue is both my kids are VERY high energy-and they feed off the pup which seems to feed off of them. So once everyone is riled up I have 3 lil monsters to calm down. I try to keep it from that point of escalation and they are finding out that they like their toes to NOT be nibbled on, so it is much better. I find it funny that the pup learns faster than the kids some days!
 

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Mine is terrible for puppy biting. Her teeth are so sharp, that its a very big concern for me, considering I don't want her nipping at my boyfriends 4 year old daughter. The vet suggest I try a "screech" when she does (a very loud "eeeee" sound because that's what her little mades would have done if she bit them too hard) but it hasn't worked at all. Every time she bites at me, I replace my foot/hand/arm etc with a chewing rope. She'll chew it for a few seconds before attacking my flesh again. I say a firm NO, and walk away, and she'll just chase after me nipping at my feet or pants.

A guy at work suggest the coins in a tin can method - that's my next step - not sure what else I can try to do.
 

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Time outs. Put her away in her pen for a few minutes to calm down. Biting means the game ends.
 

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Hey everybody,

HELP! The bf here is threatening to give Crosby back if we can't get this biting thing, crazy "attack mode" under control...ok I'm kidding about the threat, well,kinda kidding. My point is that this is becoming a serious issue with our little darling. Here's the deal...I have noticed that after pooing for some reason Crosby gets super excited more than just feeling good after a good poo, he starts to jump and flop around uncontrollably And Then he goes after legs ankles and pants like a mad dog. Last night he tore my favorite pair of pants. If this keeps up I'm seriously not going to be able to afford him. Also, we really really need help with some training tips on approaching people who want to pet the cutest little guy around. He gets waaaay to excited, won't sit and lately he's trying to bite them too...A HUGE CONCERN FOR ME AND THE BF. PLEASE HELP US, I KNOW CROSBY IS READY FOR REHAB. ANY WISDOM YOU CAN SHARE OR TRAINING TIPS WOULD BE GREATLY APPRECIATED.


Sent from Petguide.com Free App
 

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When Ellie was younger and teething, she was a nightmare! My hands and arms were shredded, it looked like I put them in a garbage disposal. One thing that really helped was when she would start nipping I would replace Me with either a rope chew or rawhide. I would also "yelp" just before giving her the replacement. she is now 10 months and has completely outgrown that phase.

Trust me, it does get better. Now my biggest problem is her constant Kisses!
 

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Barney was terrible at this....but it does get better. What finally worked for me is that every time he would start his nipping, I'd leave the room and ignore him for a minute or so. I'd then go sit down to play again and if he didn't start nipping, I would give a treat...if he did, I again left the room. I got so desperate that I spend a good 8 hours doing this. He was a lot better after that and I just kept reinforcing it....reward the good and leave him when he wasn't, which was a terrible punishment for him. It's a phase that they go through but just make sure that you teach the soft bite.
 
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