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Seeking advice:

I have a 10 month old Basset/Beagle mix. He was adopted at 5 months. When I first got him I was living in a house where he had a large back yard. I now live in an apartment, 1000 square feet, and have lived here for 2 weeks.

My issues is with his pooping. We go on frequent long walks where he has no problem going pee but as soon as we get home he poops inside. He doesn't like to go on his leash.

When I leave home I crate him. He frequently pee's in the crate and occasionally poops there, too.

Any hints to controlling his bowel movements?
 

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first i'd like to empathize. and the frowny face is exactly right it's frustrating.
bassets are stubborn. and frequently take a bit longer to house break.
structure
schedule
patience
 

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first i'd like to empathize. and the frowny face is exactly right it's frustrating.
bassets are stubborn. and frequently take a bit longer to house break.
structure
schedule
patience
I'm afraid that since he is almost a year old that we are reaching a point where he may have a hard time learning. Is it true that if a dog isn't potty trained at one year the he will have issues for the rest of his life? It sounds extreme, I know, but it is a fear of mine.
 

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If I recall correctly, MikeyT always says that they can be a year old before they are fully housebroken. My Molly is 10 months...she has the pee thing down, but not the poop. She still has #2 accidents in the house. Pee accidents are almost 100% gone, unless it's my fault for letting her go too long.

But yes, patience, persistence, and schedule are key.
 

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A consistent schedule and routine are probably the two most important in getting the potty training down.

I don't know if I am just lucky or am some kind of poop whisperer, but both of my guys had very little problem getting house broken. Within a couple of weeks of them being home they both were pretty much house broken and we havent had an accident in probably 6 months.
 

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A consistent schedule and routine are probably the two most important in getting the potty training down.

I don't know if I am just lucky or am some kind of poop whisperer, but both of my guys had very little problem getting house broken. Within a couple of weeks of them being home they both were pretty much house broken and we havent had an accident in probably 6 months.
I envy you right now. Thanks for the support, everyone.;)
 

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I'm afraid that since he is almost a year old that we are reaching a point where he may have a hard time learning. Is it true that if a dog isn't potty trained at one year the he will have issues for the rest of his life? It sounds extreme, I know, but it is a fear of mine.
Anabelle had probably never been housebroken until we adopted her at 8+ years old. Yes it was difficult and there are still accidents but after a few months of perseverance she eventually "got it".

The idea that dogs can't learn something after a certain age is just a myth, with the exception of any physical/medical problems preventing a behavior from being done.
 

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If I recall correctly, MikeyT always says that they can be a year old before they are fully housebroken
there are some that are never housetrained. I think a year is a good average, Keep in mind when I say house trained I do not simply mean a lack of accidents which is all about management. Housetrained means the dog has a signal and uses it to indicate when it need to go and 2 when required can hold or refrain from going for some extended perion of time.


{quote]Is it true that if a dog isn't potty trained at one year the he will have issues for the rest of his life?[/quote]

certainly not but the problem is what dogs do is develop a substrate preference for the surface they normally go on. This must be over come the longer this substrate prefferance for a non-acceptable surfaces ocures for and is self reinfoced the hared and longer house training will take. House training difficultly is more contigent on the number of accidents than it is on how long it has taken or how long the dog has not been house trained for so the first thing is through management eliminate the accidents and the dog being self rewarded for them.

1.
We go on frequent long walks
that is problem number 1. When taking the dog out to deficate it should be all about buisness he goes to a very limited area that you want him to go and stay there until he does. no walking around and other fun doggie stuff to do. You need to differentiate defficating and going for a walk. It is also a good idea to but defication and urination a a verbal cue so the dog understand what is expected as well. To teach the dog what is expected where you want him to go you need to be clear an consices. going for a walk an letting the dog go or not does not do this it is more "acccidental" when he dioes go rather than learning he is suppose to go.
What you have is a dog that has learn that you poop in the house and when you go for a walk you wait until you get back to go.

see
Housetraining Your Puppy[/quote] which covers substrate preferrence and teaching a go on command cues.


2. schedual is the most critical thing in managing the dog to prevent accident. affter you feed the dog it is going to need to defficate. If you have exercise, sleep access to whater on a schedule when the dog need to pee will be as well. a lott easier to prevent an accident when you know when the dog has to go.


So seriously how doe the crate help in this case in housetraining? Alll that happes is the dog will over time develop a subrstare prefference for going in the crate. It is a myth a dog will not soil its den or crate. There is a tendency not to but this is far from being absolute. Dogs/puupy do this to start primarily for two reasons. ! is because they are left in the crate two long and can't hold it hany longer. ie basical forced to go in the crate by circumstances, or two suffer from sepperation anxiety and the peeing and pooping in the crate is a manifestation of that. either way makes the crat more of hinder to house training than a help once it happens on a farily consistent basis.


Any hints to controlling his bowel movements?
Food in + food out the are biological reasons but the act of eating starts the process of the dogs needing to defficate. So if feed a minimium twice a day but if the dog has more frequent bm match the numbe of bm per day to the number of times fed. When this is done the dog will need to go shortly after eating . Take him to the spot you want him to go. Keep him there until he does.

for appartment dwellers the himt below may be more difficult to do but even then given the particular circumstances not always [url=http://www.clickersolutions.com/articles/2002b/pottytraining.htm]Potty Training Tip
Get an x-pen, also called a puppy pen or an exercise pen. They're small pens made of heavy metal wire fencing. They give the pup an area not too much bigger than a large crate, and they sit right on the ground. Set up the x-pen in a grassy area with nothing else on the ground inside it, use a few tent stakes to stake it to the ground so it can't be knocked over if the pup jumps up against it, and put her inside. She doesn't come out to sniff, or play or go inside, until she goes potty. As soon as she goes potty, out she comes with much rejoicing, apply treats to puppy liberally, and then it's play/explore time, or whatever else she wants to do. Her reward for pottying is to get out of "potty prison".
but this can be done by simply keep the dog an a short leed is one spot as well.

3. Lastly the biggies mistake most make is assumeing that the dog is simply going to find on his own a cue to use to tell you he nedds to go out. A large percentage of the time that never happens. The more sure fire way is to train the dog to us a particular cue of you own chosing. On of the easiet is to train the dog to ring a bell(s)
http://www.clickersolutions.com/articles/2001b/bell.htmHouse Training: Ring My Bell!
 

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You may wish to use the match trick to teach him that it's okay to poop on a leash.

The match trick:

Take a paper match (unlit) and moisten the sulfur end

Stick it in his butt.

Give him the command you are using to indicate you want him to poop (I use "hurry up") and move him around or go for a walk.

If he has to poop at all, he will do so within a few minutes.

Praise and reward.

If he does not have to go, remove the match.
 

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Yup,it really works but I only use it before going to a show.I also had a basset (who was too smart for herself)and could not seem to get her to stop deficating and urinating in her crate. One day when she was 15 months old she didn't go in the crate and never did again past that point.Everytime I cleaned out that crate my husband would say ,"Haven't you had enough of that yet"? And I would tell him it is a matter of wills and I am as stubborn as she and will do this until she gets it. There comes a time (from what I've learned of this breed) when whatever it is you are trying to teach them will kick in and they will get it. Some sooner than others but eventually they get it. I've seen that when getting a puppy started in ring training they do not know what you want from them, but a day comes in their own little minds when they walk with their head and tail up ,stand for exam,go up the ramp,and you wonder why you have been fighting with them so hard about something.I would pick up the poo left inside and move it outside to where you want him to go.It may help him to think if has gone there before he can go there now. Strange ground is one of the difficult things in training a younger dog, they have no scent at the new place so they don't want to go potty.After they go at the area a couple times there is usually no problem .
 

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I'm sorry you're having such a hard time with this. Mine got the pooping outside part pretty quick. But we had a hard time with Virga peeing inside. Eventually she got it. It's like a light clicked on for her one day. I think the same will happen for your guy. What I would suggest is to keep him outside on his leash until he poops. Then make a huge deal about it. Give him lots of praise and treat him. I've never heard of the match trick. That's pretty neat. Good luck with everything!
 

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So why is it that the match trick so prevelent with show breeders and the conformation ring when eliminating in the ring is not a penalty but in the performance sports where it is that result in getting you kick out not so much?
 

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So why is it that the match trick so prevelent with show breeders and the conformation ring when eliminating in the ring is not a penalty but in the performance sports where it is that result in getting you kick out not so much?
I couldn't tell you. I've used it before trials if I thought the dog had to go.

Besides, even if the dog does not eliminate in the conformation ring, if it has to poop it won't move right.
 

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For me, I would like to be sure they have done all that stuff outside the ring because if my dog has to go it will make any good dog gate funny,or stop up the line of dogs in the ring just so my dog can poop,or all the other dogs go around me while my dog is crapping. All of that is just a tad embarrassing even if no points are deducted from my dog. Sometimes it is embarrassing enough to see me handling my dog.
 

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it has to poop it won't move right.
That is what I thought. Sometimes having to go can be an incentive to move faster in a performance event. but usual it does not end well. I also wonder if not more performance owners/handler have it on cue as well because training what they enjoy/do

I compete quite often against a tiny pom that was not allowed to urinate before running because it often made the difference or not if the teter would tip the dog was a shade under three lbs.
 

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I also wonder if not more performance owners/handler have it on cue as well because training what they enjoy/do
Most of my older dogs have it on cue too, but the cue is not as reliable as the match.

Actually, Rosie can usually be counted on to poop in the agility ring if I don't make sure she does it before.
 
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