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Discussion Starter #1
Even though her blood tests are perfectly normal, I am convinced Lady has kidney disease or something going on. She drinks excessively (she has since I got her in 2002 or 2003) and has some muscle wasting in her back legs (which is apparently common with dysplasia ... but I just don't believe dysplasia all that's contributing to it).

The latest is that her poop is very, very dry. She's not constipated, although I ran out of her beloved carrots at the end of last week and she did, indeed, have some odd looking poopies --- little dry things.

The thing is, I have been driving my vet absolutely nuts with Lady questions. So I'm not quite willing to call her about something which might turn out to be yet another "nothing."

So I'm asking here --- should I be worried about her dry little poopies? Are they evidence of serious disease in an older dog? Is this reason to call my vet and get Lady in there again?
 

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I think with an old dog in declining health, it's not unreasonable to question any changes, including strange looking stools.I used to feel that I was bothering the vet with all kinds of stuff when Hansel was in his old age, but our vet didn't mind; in fact seemed to be happy we cared enough to do this, because so many people don't. I bet your vet would see it the same way. Sending best wishes to Lady- please let us know what happens-
 

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Biscuit,

One of the functions of the large intestine is reabsorption of water. Increased thirst and urination often occur in chronic kidney failure because the kidneys need more water to get rid of the waste build up in the blood. Dry stools occur because there's less water to be reabsorbed, hence the stools contain less water.

I'm sure Betsy will be able to add more valuable info. I know people that have brought their pets to the vets for years to get sub cutaneous fluids everyday because they had chronic renal failure. It's really something that's pretty easy to do at home.
 

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Aha.

I just read this, and it also mentions nausea and lack of appetite as a part of chronic kidney failure. In fact, the last time I had Lady at the vet, just a couple of weeks ago, it was because she had lost her appetite for a few days.

Okay. I have no idea why her tests are coming out normal, but I'm getting her back into the vet. Every instinct I have says it's kidney failure, and the subcutaneous fluids and a change in diet sound like they're in order.

Thanks, Barbara. I'll call the vet tomorrow and hopefully have Lady on a new plan by the end of the week.
 

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A substantial amount of kidney filtering function must be lost before these changes are reflected in the serum (blood) parameters commonly used to assess renal function. Has Lady had a recent urinalysis?

Here is an e-mail support list for CRF dogs: K9KIDNEYS
Mission Statement - K9KIDNEYS: The K9KIDNEYS list is a high volume (sometimes exceeding 60 messages per day) list for owners of dogs suffering from one or more forms of kidney disorders. The structural emphasis will revolve around current veterinary therapy models, feeding models and other necessary “tips and tricks” in the management of the renal dog. It is designed to be a comforting and supportive environment.[/b]
 

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No, she hasn't Betsy. And I should have been smart enough to ask that because I've been certain her kidneys are off for a while now.

She puts out so much :huh: , though, it wouldn't be hard to get a urine sample.
 

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Jeepers, Linda. I have no advice but I certainly hope you can get to the bottom of Lady's problems.
Here's best wishes!
 
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