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Okay I'm new to this so bare with me. Okay I adopted a Basset Hound from down south and live in New England. He is a great dog but randomly will attack. He attacked my girlfriends little sister twice while she was walking by him and the cut required stitches. Now I'm starting to think its a dominance issue because if he is laying somewhere on the bed and I try to get him down he will growl at me and show teeth. Just the other day Him and I were laying on the floor and he woke up from a nap and moaned and looking at me out of the corner of his eye and attacked the side of my face ripping me ear open and cutting just to the right of my right eye. I am unsure what to do. Can anyone help me?
 

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I'm very sorry, but it is my opinion that a dog that randomly attacks with enough force to require stitches is dangerous and should be euthanized.
 

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I had to put one down that started biting, including my son's face. Hardest thing I ever had to do. My step-father actually had to take him, because I just couldn't.
 

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I would just hate to do that. I got him 4 months ago and he is 3 and a half years old and I don't feel that putting him down would be the responsible thing to do. When I signed the adoption papers to me it was like adopting a child and I'm looking for advice on what I can do to curve his behavior I feel like everything is cureable and as dumb as this sounds if he is only biting me I can deal with that and change it but I dont want him biting someone else I would rather have him bite me that way I would think it would be easier to break him of the habbit.
 

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I'm sure there is some training that could be done to eliminate this, would probably be awfully difficult given his age. I would talk to a trainer before I put the poor guy down.

My youngest had some aggression issues and the few times that he did snap or bite I let him know very quickly that I bit harder than he did and that pretty much ended the aggressive behavior.
 

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How did you show him that? Mine is 55lbs and a male so I was a little apprehensive on what to do? I have already gotten on the phone with a trainer and scheduled appointments but was curiuos to see what has worked for other Basset owners. This is my first Basset on my own but I had four growing up and I would never put him down just due to the fact that he deserves life and until he brutaly hurts someone I just couldn't put the cute lil fella down.
 

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U don't put a dog down because of improper training. This dog obviously has dominance issues. Regardless if he was from the south, hell I'm in the south with 5 southern Bassets. One was aggressive while growing up. It took alot of patience and training 2 rid of that aggressive behavior. U have 2 get this dog on a schedule. Walks, walks, and then more walks. U have a computer...look up DOG WHISPERER with Ceasar Milan.
The easiest option is 2 put a dog down....that is never the answer!!! Be responsible and get help.
 

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Definitely sounds like an issue that a behaviorist would be helpful in, I would look for a trainer who specializes in aggression and is a certified behaviorist.

If it ends up that you personally can't help the dog I would look for a basset hound rescue to surrender him to, they won't put him down and maybe they have a foster who has dealt with aggression before that could help? It would be worth a shot to look and contact some.
 

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You might think of trying a muzzle until you can get with a trainer. Also private message Mikey T if he doesn't comment on this thread. He has loads of experience with bassets and should be able to give you some good advice on what action you should take.

Another thought would be to contact a local basset rescue in your area and ask them for some advice. They deal with stuff like this and hopefully will be able to help you with his issues.

Thank you for taking in this hound and I applaud your determination to work with him.
 

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Putting the dog down wasn't my first or second choice. It was about the 20th. Our vet was a basset breeder (who didn't have any puppies at the time I bought this one). He said the aggression was part of a genetic neurological problem, and he was the one who talked me into it after everything else we tried failed.
 

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I think you need to call a professional, either an experienced dog behaviorist or a very experienced trainer. If he is not already he should be neutered to both help the behavior and prevent any chance of passing the trait on.

I would say you are past the point of being able to solve the problem without outside help in your home.
 

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How did you show him that? Mine is 55lbs and a male so I was a little apprehensive on what to do? I have already gotten on the phone with a trainer and scheduled appointments but was curiuos to see what has worked for other Basset owners. This is my first Basset on my own but I had four growing up and I would never put him down just due to the fact that he deserves life and until he brutaly hurts someone I just couldn't put the cute lil fella down.
Mine was about 45 lbs when he started getting an attitude. I'm sure this is not the best way to go about things, but when he snapped at me I rolled him over, got on top and bit down on a big hunk of his loose neck skin. I held him there for probably five minutes, anytime he got grumpy or tried to struggle I just applied a little pressure.

Again, I'm sure this is totally the wrong approach, but it worked for me. I figured that dogs do this to each other so I'll let him know that I will always be the bigger dog. Probably a dumb thing to do, but we havent had any problems since. Not to mention the rediculous amount of dog hair you end up with in your mouth.
 

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I applaud you and everyone in here for saying it is wrong to just help your problem by destroying the dog...I have a certain amount of additude from my almost 6 month basset....but I give him a firm response and he is getting better....don't give up..there is an answer out there...

I also agree to contact MikeyT....he is very knowledgeable on numerous topics so it is a great place to start..best of luck...

kristi
 

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Please don't even consider euthanizing him (of course this is only my opinion). Woofus was one of the worst cases that his rescue Daphneyland had (mind you she always has around 100 dogs). He had a red collar (which means stay away from that dog) for 2 years. She worked on him, and he's an amazing dog. There is hope. Check out my firstgiving page for Mr. Woofus's story and maybe it'll give you a little hope.
www.firstgiving.com/fundraiser/woofus
 

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Now I'm starting to think its a dominance issue because if he is laying somewhere on the bed and I try to get him down he will growl at me and show teeth
That incident is not a dominance issue it ius a resource guarding issue. The bed bed, a comfortable spot, is being guarded. This is a normal adaptive behavior in dogs. That does not make it an acceptable behavior however the best resource on this issue is Mine! - A PRACTICAL GUIDE TO RESOURCE GUARDING IN DOGS

FWIW dominace model ie alpha etc has be basical been discredited as a a viable theory for dog behavior and social organization. dogs contrary to popular opinion do not for pack etc. see The Social Organization of the Domestic Dog
A Longitudinal Study of Domestic Canine Behavior and the
Ontogeny of Canine Social Systems



Dominance in domestic dogsduseful construct or bad
habit?

from Journal of veterinary behavior
Hence, it is commonly suggested that a desire ‘to be dominant’ actually drives behavior, especially aggression, in the domestic dog. By contrast, many recent studies of wolf packs have questioned whether there is any direct correspondence between dominance within a relationship and agonistic behavior, and in contrast to wolves, hierarchical social structures have little relationship with reproductive behavior in feral dog packs. Nor do the exchanges of aggressive and submissive behavior in feral dogs, originally published by S. K. Pal and coworkers, fit the pattern predicted from wolf behavior, especially the submissive behavior observed between members of different packs. In the present study of a freely interacting group of neutered male domestic dogs, pairwise relationships were evident, but no overall hierarchy could be detected. Since there seems to be little empirical basis for wolf-type dominance hierarchies in dogs, the authors have examined alternative constructs[/URL]

That said I think the Book reccommend above will be of limited use. That is because this dog lacks an escential ingredient for a successful out come. That is bite inhibition That is the abbility to control bite force so as not to cause damage. Obvious this dog does not have it. It can be easily taught to puppies upto about the age of 20 weeks after that age bite inhibition training is not reliable. Why is bite inhibition inportant to outcome? it is quite simple. in training there are going to be situation of proffing and training in which the dog is going to need to be test when the dog does not have bite inhibition these tests can not be ethically done in real world situation. that is the human involved need to have protective gear ie kevlar glove , bite suit which will effect the result. It is not ucommon for a dog to lear a certain technique is not effective when tyhe human wears protective gear but is when they don't. Also you can't ethical train and put childern ect in harms way as well so all this direct effect the abilty to modfy the dogs behavior succesfully, So the less inhibited the dog bites the less succesful behavior modification and the higher need for management . ie dog and childern never together

In situations like this the observations of the owner are going to be bias,
randomly will attack
. This is actual exceedingly rare there is usually a dernable trigger that well trained observers will notice. In those cases were attacks are random it invariable is the result of a nuerolical problem that can not be fixed. Since you are in New England the best thing for you to do is Contact The Behavior Clinic at Tufts School For Veterinary Medicine in North Grafton MA They have the medical and behavioral resources to give you the information you need to make a decission if this dog can be saved or not. doing anything less could result in someone in the family being severly mauled.


have a computer...look up DOG WHISPERER with Ceasar Milan.
Follow any advice of ceasar is the fastest way to get a severely bitten. THere is a reason his is the only dog show on television with a disclaimer. I'm sorry but any "dog whisper " that routinely gets bitten is not someone's example you should follow. especial since his theories of dog packs and orgainzation are discredeted. This is not to say some of the things he does are not effective just the reason they are effective are not what he claims. and ofte what he calls a dog that is "calm and submissve' instead is a dog that has "shut down " wheich in the end creates a whole host of other problems.

see THE DOG WHISPERER CONTROVERSY
The Dog Whisperer: Frequently Asked Questions



 Position Statement on the Use of Dominance Theory in Behavior Modification of Animals


 American Veterinary Society of Animal Behavior
AVSAB is concerned with the recent re-emergence of dominance theory and forcing dogs and other animals into submission as a means of preventing and correcting behavior problems.
Experts Say Dominance-Based Dog Training Techniques Made Popular by Television Shows Can Contribute to Dog Bites
Sophia Yin veterinarian and applied animal behaviorist
Says Meghan Herron, DVM, lead author of the study, "Our study demonstrated that many confrontational training methods, whether staring down dogs, striking them, or intimidating them with physical manipulation such as alpha rolls [holding dogs on their back], do little to correct improper behavior and can elicit aggressive responses."

These techniques are pervasive in many T.V. shows and some popular books. For instance, The Dog Whisperer with Cesar Millan routinely demonstrates alpha rolls, dominance downs and forced exposure to things that cause fear or aggression, and has depicted Millan restraining dogs or performing physical corrections in order to take valued possessions away from them. [/url]

If You're Aggressive, Your Dog Will Be Too, Says Veterinary Study

Survey of the use and outcome of confrontational and
non-confrontational training methods in client-owned dogs
showing undesired behaviors

Recommendations
often include aversive training techniques which may provoke fearful or defensively
aggressive behavior. The purpose of this study was to assess the behavioral effects and
safety risks of techniques used historically by owners of dogs with behavior problems

...For each intervention applied, owners were asked to indicate whether there
was a positive, negative, or lack of effect on the dog’s behavior, and whether aggressive
behavior was seen in association with the method used.

...Several confrontational methods such as ‘‘hit or kick dog for undesirable
behavior’’ (43%), ‘‘growl at dog’’ (41%), ‘‘physically force the release of an item from a dog’s
mouth’’ (39%), ‘‘alpha roll’’ (31%), ‘‘stare at or stare [dog] down’’ (30%), ‘‘dominance down’’
(29%), and ‘‘grab dog by jowls and shake’’ (26%) elicited an aggressive response from at
least a quarter of the dogs on which they were attempted. Dogs presenting for aggression
to familiar people were more likely to respond aggressively to the confrontational
techniques ‘‘alpha roll’’ and yelling ‘‘no’’ compared to dogs with other presenting
complaints (P < 0.001). In conclusion, confrontational methods applied by dog owners
before their pets were presented for a behavior consultation were associated with
aggressive responses in many cases. It is thus important for primary care veterinarians to
advise owners about risks associated with such training methods and provide guidance
and resources for safe management of behavior problems.
 

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Personally I don't think euthanasia is a fair option if you don't first make the effort to correct the problem with a professional.

If you are more specific about where you live perhaps someone can recommend a professional.

Until then I would keep the dog separated from just about everyone for safety.
 

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applaud you and everyone in here for saying it is wrong to just help your problem by destroying the dog...Ia certain amount of additude from my almost 6 month basset....but I give him a firm response and he is getting better....do have
One needs to take the developmental stage into account when dealing with any behavioral issue. most things i.e attitude in a adolescent are to be expected and normal from a developmental stand point. That is far from the case with agreesion and more so aggression that causes serious harm there are far wourse things than putting down such a dog, such as passing on to another to deal with.

Please don't even consider euthanizing him (of course this is only my opinion). Woofus was one of the worst cases that his rescue Daphneyland had (mind you she always has around 100 dogs). He had a red collar (which means stay away from that dog) for 2 years.
One first has to determine if the issue is purely behavioral or if there is also a nuerolgical or medical component and if that medical or nueroligical component can be fixed. There are things like tumors, siezure induced rage etc that are not curable and will only get worse over time. Secoandly not everyone has the wherewithal to be able to practice the management techniques to keed everyone safe while working through a sever behavioral issue and not alll all behaviora issue can be cured or successfully managed.

Like I said above euthanasia is often the kindest solution., Until you have had to deal with dangers of such an unpridictable dog you can not truely appreaceate the mental an emotional toll it takes. on everyone. Including other dogs in the jhousehold. I have put down a dog which had nuerological issues complicating its behavioral issues in the past. It was not an easy decision but one a certainly do not regret. At some point it becomes a quality of life issue for the dog involved as well.
 

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As the mother of a 5, 12, 17 year olds I would beg you to keep the dog away from others until the situation improves. My 5 year old was riding his bike last weekend and was bit by our neighbor's dog in the ankle. They accidentially left their gate open and the dog got out. It broke the skin and made him scream like I've never heard before. My son has always been around dogs and has never been afraid of them until now.

I loved the post about biting back... I had a Springer many years ago that was extremely easy to train. He'd chew on a shoe, I'd hit him with it, he'd stay away from my shoes! He'd dig a hole in the yard, I'd place a mousetrap in there, he'd walk around with a red mark on his nose for a few weeks but he never dug in the yard again! I could go on and on forever about him...
 
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