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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Folks,

Hello. It's been long time since my last post (just hovering in the background).

But I really really need some help and advice.... My older Bassett (Poppy - now over 2 years old) has recently become agressive (when I say recently I mean in the last 4 months) towards my husband - the straw that broke the camels back with me today which prompted my post was she actually went for him with real aggression!! I am beside myself, why is she doing this? We do everything right and we've had no problems with our 9 month old (Tillie - such a sweetie, so gentle).

I really don't want to do anything drastic (but the last thing I want is for her to bite somebody) - I just cannot understand it she is such a sweet girl normally, just really aggresive towards my husband...

PLEASE HELP!!!

Many thanks,
Jaimie
 

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What happened? Did he try to move her while she was asleep? Was she eating? Or did it come out of the blue?

Is Poppy spayed? Has she been to the vet lately? Any health issues?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
It is only when he goes to let her out to pee or he wants her to move.

No health issues - she doesn't do it with me (maybe it's because she knows that I'm 'top dog'??)

Yes she is spayed.

Any ideas?
 

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Without more details (where is Poppy when this happens--on the couch next to you perhaps?) it sounds like Poppy needs to be reminded that she isn't second in command. Your husband can spend a few minutes every day putting her through basic obedience commands. He can also be the one to feed her. And for now at least, she shouldn't be allowed on the couch or in the bed with you. I had to do this with my rescue, Stomps, when he became aggressive toward Lightning. It was sad not to be able to cuddle with him in bed or have him in my lap, but it stopped the aggression. There are a lot more things your husband can do, but others will have to remind me what they are. That's what worked for me.
 

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Is he trying to move her when she's asleep? If so, you might want to remind him of the wisdom of the old saying "Let sleeping dogs lie." :eek: :eek:

If she's asleep or napping, he needs to wake her up from a distance by, eg, moving the sofa (always effective in this household) or pulling on the sheets or, say, jangling the car keys. That should get her up, and then he should tell her to move.

Otherwise, he should tell her once to move, and she needs to move.

Yes, I know --- you're dealing with a basset. :lol: :lol: But even Biscuit would move when told ONCE to move. True, he'd try to make a run at getting into a power struggle, but I persevered and was more stubborn, and soon enough (with full fanfare of grunting and groaning and "how could you???"s), he'd move.

Don't get into pissing matches with them. Let them know this is their big chance.
 

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Yes, I know --- you're dealing with a basset. :lol: :lol: But even Biscuit would move when told ONCE to move. True, he'd try to make a run at getting into a power struggle, but I persevered and was more stubborn, and soon enough (with full fanfare of grunting and groaning and "how could you???"s), he'd move.

Don't get into pissing matches with them. Let them know this is their big chance.[/b]
The first thing is you never going to want to get into a physical confrontration with a dog that has shown it is willing to be agreessive unless you are willing to getint a fight to the death because the dog may be willing to go that far.

!. violence begets violence. see AGGRESSION BEGETS AGGRESSION
Most aggressive behaviors are the result of fear or anxiety in the dog. As in any animal, fear and anxiety causes an increase in adrenaline and stress hormones. Punishing the dog can sabotage the training process by actually increasing adrenaline and stress levels, creating a dog that is overstimulated and beyond the ability to learn.

Dogs learn by association. If a dog-reactive dog is routinely delivered an electrical shock or collar correction while looking at another dog, the dog will begin associating another dog with pain, thereby increasing the dog's level of anxiety and reactivity upon seeing another dog.[/b]
in short hand what happens if the dog is acting aggresively it is not in a mind set to learn. It is very unlikely that it will associate the punishment with its behavior , no it will associate the punishment with you in that particular context and so the next time that context arises it will react even more strongly to thwart the threat it percieves.

No health issues - she doesn't do it with me (maybe it's because she knows that I'm 'top dog'??)[/b]
Do not be too quick to dismiss health issue, it is a new behavior has she been exmined since the behavior start if not do so,

The last half of the statement is highly unlikely is highly unlikely. ! won't even get into the false notion that dogs percieve humans as "pack members" wich is patently rediculous but seettle on the notion most aggressin on the part of dogs is feared based. It is far more likely that the reason she only is aggressive with your husband is because she only feels threaten by your husband. This is not to imply that the dogs perception is correct just that it does exist and is what the dog is acting on. Dogs that are fearfull of men is not uncomon.

If you would like more reading on the misguide role pack therory plays in dog training

The History and Misconceptions of Dominance Theory

The Macho Myth

ARE YOU THE ALPHA?

some other thread that may be of help
Aggressive behavior, New Basset - showing aggressiveness

Bad Penny (act of aggression)

Quick question on dominance issues

Agression in Bassets???


Even with all this info provide it could easily all be totally useless. because without actually seeing the dogs reaction no one trained profeesional or not can make an accurate diagnoses etc because any discription of the dogs actions are being filtered. so it best in cases like this to use a behaviorist that actual can observes the dog behavior and work hands on with you to solve it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Guy, guys! What can I say? Thanks so very much for all of the advice - I will have Stuart read it all and we'll see where we go - but I will get her checked out by the vet - Just to be sure.

Thanks again!

Lots of love to you all (and your babies!!)

Jaimie
xx
 

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Guy, guys! What can I say? Thanks so very much for all of the advice - I will have Stuart read it all and we'll see where we go - but I will get her checked out by the vet - Just to be sure.[/b]

hormonal conditions like hypothrodism and pain are the most common medical reasons associated with aggressive behavior.


Since most aggressive bevior in dogs is out of fear. working on alieviating fear is often sucesful

so more extensive refernse material in this regard are

CAUTIOUS CANINE, 2ND EDITION

HELP FOR YOUR SHY DOG

Keep in mind however not not all fearful dogs are shy,
 
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