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My husband and I went to Petland to buy crickets for his gekko and we saw a baby basset hound in the window; of course i just had to play with him so they put us in a cubicle and let me play, I fell head over heels of course and I asked the price....he was $900 plus tax I could not afford him and I really think that is a bit pricey. Is that the going rate for bassets now?
 

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Adoption fees charged by rescue organizations are generally far lower than $900.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
adoption

I am considering adoption the fee in my area is $200 which is very reasonable, my only concern is how Eeyore will react to an adult hound. I think a puupy would be a better compadre for him; we had Snoopy which was the same age and I gave him to my dad when he lost his dog of 13 years. Snoopy and Eeyore used to fight, we got snoopy as an adult... Do you know if maybe i could get a girl adult and maybe eeyore would not be as aggressive toward her.
 

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Also to add that by buying a pet store puppy you would be suporting puppy mills. I don't cross the threshold of any store that sells puppies-they zren't getting one cent of my business.

Bassets generally do fine with another basset!

Help Stop Puppy Mills-get your next dog from basset rescue!
 

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If Eeyore has a problem getting along with other dogs, it might be better to wait until he goes on to his reward before getting another dog. While it is possible to keep more than one dog in a household where one dog is dog-aggressive, it take a lot of work. Often, the dogs must be kept separated permanently, which can be quite disruptive.
 

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I'm not too familiar with US prices, but I'd think that for $900 you could get a top-quality pet puppy from a good breeder, rather than wasting that money on a puppymill product.
 

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$950 is a rip-off. For $1,000 you could get a really top-bred Basset. and most breeders sell them for $300-$500.
 

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I think I am so lucky to live in an area where I have never seen a pet store sell puppies or kittens. I wish we could stop the practice entirely.

But, the puppies etc. should not be the ones to pay the price.

I am all for rescue bassets. MOst of mine came from rescues and the others were rehomes that would've ended up in rescues. They are all phenomenal dogs!

I don't know how old Eeyore is (LOVE the name) but I've had very few aggression issue with mine. I feed them separately to avoid those probelms, but that is my preference not something that is probably necessary. Good luck
 

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Originally posted by Booya
$950 is a rip-off. For $1,000 you could get a really top-bred Basset. and most breeders sell them for $300-$500.

:eek:


In the UK, bassets tend to go for around £600 + - approx $1100.

[Although I got my Snoopy cheaper because he was last in the litter and no one wanted him because of his colour]
 

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In the US, prices for puppies are quite variable. I would estimate that $250-500 would be about what one would pay for a poorly-bred puppy from a BYB in most areas.

A well-bred, pet-quality puppy from a responsible breeder would likely cost no less than $600 (and that's probably low), to over $1000, depending on the region.
 

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Originally posted by Betsy Iole
In the US, prices for puppies are quite variable. I would estimate that $250-500 would be about what one would pay for a poorly-bred puppy from a BYB in most areas.

A well-bred, pet-quality puppy from a responsible breeder would likely cost no less than $600 (and that's probably low), to over $1000, depending on the region.
yeah. those are the prices i've seen too.

i'll say this - i've had two bassets in my life. the first one, i paid $250 for from a couple who placed an ad in a newspaper. and i loved her very much. but she had some serious behavior problems.

my second basset, which i have now, was $1000 and let me tell you - it was worth every penney.

it's not to say that all BYB puppies are going to have behavior problems, or even that a majority of them will, but having experienced what it's like, i'm willing to pay the extra price.
 

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Originally posted by Tom&Daug
AKC bassett puppies bring $300-$400 here in Kansas. That is from a good breeder and not a puppy mill.
i wondered. what is the difference between a good breeder and what people here refer to as BYB? can BYB be good breeders?

don't small scale breeders produce good dogs too?
 

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For me, good breeder equals responsible breeder. A breeder who breeds only bassets that conform well to the standard, who screens breeding stock for genetic disorders, and whose dogs don't regularly end up in shelters/rescues due to health or behavioral problems or due to poor screening of puppy buyers. I don't personally know of any BYB's who meet these standards.

Not all show breeders meet them, either. I just became acquainted with the phrase "show-mill".
There are also \"show mills\" out there - people who actively compete with their dogs and pay big money for advertising - but they are still over-breeding and selling puppies as a business, rather than doing limited, educated, hobby breeding to improve the breed. They make up a large percentage of the dogs we see in rescue, and these dogs often have genetic health or temperament problems
Source

Here are some sources that discuss responsible breeding, BYBs and puppymills.

Backyard Breeder vs. Reputable Breeder

Thoughts on Responsible Breeding

Finding a Responsible Breeder

Puppy Producers: Who Are They?

Breeding Information from wonderpuppy.net
 

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Daug came from a good breeder. It was a husband and wife who raised and sold Bassetts. To me a good breeder is anyone who has a love of the breed and not a love of the money.
 

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Moe came from a BYB, initially. The BYB evidently couldn't sell poor deformed little Moe so he tied him to the gate of the shelter one hot July night. Deformed, scarred from either abuse or neglect, sick, infested with parasites of every kind, and totally lacking in even the most basic training or care, he was a sorry-looking beast. But he had a beautiful face and seemed full of joy, in spite of his rocky start in life. He cost us forty dollars in adoption fees (twenty-five of which was refunded upon neutering), three hundred fifty dollars in vet fees, and one hundred and fifty dollars at the pet store for basic supplies. Then who knows how much I spent in our search for the perfect food and dog shampoo... all in all, I think we got a h*** of a bargain!!! Who can put a price on the love and joy he brought to our lives?

Moe's BYB is a perfect example of a bad BYB. From my own town, he breeds the same two dogs continuously, each litter producing at least one pup with the same genetic deformity that Moe has, some of them needing very costly reconstructive surgery just to walk. (Moe is fortunate that his deformity doesn't hinder his ability to walk or run, though we have to keep his weight down and treat him with buffered aspirin when it pains him). If the pups don't sell, the man ties them to gates or trees of shelters all over the East Bay area, under cover of darkness. We met several of Moe's siblings at the Basset Bash... one pretty girl who had a home with a loving family who, with the help of Colonial Basset Hound Rescue, had had the reconstructive surgery and was conpletely recovered, and another who was still in the care of CBR and had steel pins in her leg from recent surgery and was awaiting adoption. That's an example of a BAD BYB.

I've heard stories of people who get two Bassets and breed them, then sell the puppies (and if this is not for money then why do it? Why put a beloved pet through a process that can cause health problems?). If a person is lucky, things go fine. If they are not, they can lose pups and/or the mother dog. Breeding is a complicated process that should be carefully planned and closely supervised by responsible knowledgeable people who care for the animals and thier offspring. There is work and expense involved. A vet is usually on call near the birthing time and C-sections are sometimes needed. A BYB has very little or no knowledge of breeding - they simply put a male and a female together regardless of health or genetic history and let the dogs go at it. Then they oooh and aaah over the cute little pups and place an add in the paper or put a sign by the road "Puppies for sale". A responsible breeder carefully screens a prospective buyer, who, if they pass inspection, must sign a contract or agreement that stipulates, among other things, that the dog be returned to them if things don't work out for any reason. A BYB will sell to anyone. Even the ones who may care for thier pups don't really do anything to ensure the pups happiness or well-being. Personnaly I would leave the breeding to the people who know what they are doing and spay or neuter my own dogs, so I could enjoy my time with them. There are way too many dogs without homes out there :cry: without me adding to the problem with my ignorance or need of money.

Terry
 

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There are only 2 Basset Hound Club of America members in the state of Kansas and only one of them is registered as a breeder. Belinda.
 
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Good post, Terry. That's my view of the typical BYB, too. Betsy, the term "show mill" tells me these people know exactly what they're doing. By showing their dogs, they're trying to bring a aura of respectability to what they're doing, but behind the scenes, they're still in it for the money. Unfortunately they probably will muddy the waters and make it even harder for the person wanting a good quality pup to know for certain that they're dealing with someone who knows what they're doing.

Janet 'n Twinkie
 

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To me a good breeder is anyone who has a love of the breed and not a love of the money.
If they REALLY loved the breed they would leave the breeding up to responsible breeders that breed for conformation standards, and screen for genetic health problems.

My first basset was a BYB and I love her to death but she is a completely different dog than the other two bassets I have from a responsible breeder. You can breed for temperament, which is just as important (perhaps even more so) as all the other things that make a basset a basset.
 
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