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I don't know much about this stuff, but I assume congratulations are in order. You have mine!

 

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Congratulations from another "ignorant" Basset fan! I checked the links, so at least I know it's agility - which is really some achievement!! Mind you, we all know how fast a Basset can move when they really want to, and navigate their way at full speed around your house and yard without flinching!

Well done!!
 

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I'm pretty ignorant about Agility too, but my recollection is that USDAA is probably *the* most demanding Agility venue, so congratulations! Your achievements are pretty impressive...pictures anywhere on the web?
 

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Congrats to Mariah! :)
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Jumpers is an agility class that does not have any contact obstacles and the table, Weave poles may or maynot exist in USDAA but usual that don't in AKC they are required. The Course times are much faster than standard and in general the course layout is more technical requiring more crossed (change side the dog works on in relation to the handler) with more off course oportunities.


Glad you did't ask about snooker cuz even after explaining it you'ld still be scratching your head. It is the game class that emphysizes the handler, a good handler can compensate for a slower dog an still win, Not the case in Jumpers. Snooker is also the only non-tournament class that required you beat other dogs to earn a title. 3 of the 5 qualify rounds required to earn a title must be super Q in the top 15% of dogs competing at a given height. Toughy was the first Basset hound to earn a masters level title in USDAA with Performance III Snooker title.

From Dog Sports

Snooker: Loosely based on the tabletop game of Snooker. The course has at least three red jumps, each numbered 1, and six other obstacles numbered 2 through 7. The dog accumulates points based on the obstacle's number. This also has two parts, an opening sequence and a closing sequence. In the opening sequence, the dog must complete a 1, then any obstacle numbered 2 to 7, a different 1 and any 2 to 7 obstacle (including the one already performed), and yet another different 1 and another 2-7 obstacle. For example, the dog could perform the red on the left for 1 point, the 7-point obstacle, the red in the middle for 1 point and then the 7-pointer again, then the red on the far side of the course and the 7-pointer one more time, for a total of 24 points in the opening. After successfully completing this, the dog must complete the obs tacles 2-7, in order, for an additional possible 27 points. Failure to follow these rules exactly (such as knocking a bar or taking 2 reds in a row) results in the dog and handler being whistled off the course.


Strategy and entertainment value: The interesting part of the game is in seeing how people structure their opening sequence to gain more points and to be in a good position to flow into the closing sequence and still remain within the fairly short standard course time. At the higher levels of competition, most dog/handler teams strive to use the 7-point obstacle for all of their opening-sequence points. The judges are aware of this, so they typically place the 7-point obstacle in a position that makes it challenging to reach from each of the red 1-point obstacles; the dogs might have to negotiate between other obstacles without taking them or make a difficult entry to the obstacle, often combined with a longer distance between the reds and the 7 so that it consumes more time to do the higher-point obstacle in the opening.


Snooker rules
Sample Snooker Course
 
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