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:unsure: I just read this list of 20 things to never feed your pet in the Sunday, Sept. 2, 2007 edition of the Parade Magazine. The article was written by Karen Halligan, a veterinarian. :unsure:

1. Alcohol 2. Apple cores 3. Avocado 4. Bones 5. Caffeine
6. Cheese 7. Chocolate 8. Dough 9. Fat 10. Garlic
11. Grapes 12. Ham 13. Liver 14. Milk 15. Moldy food
16. Mushrooms 17. Onions 18. Potato peels 19. Raisins
20. Tuna

:eek: Some I knew, but cheese, ham, liver, and tuna really surprised me. :eek: We have used cheese to wrap pills in, and Bogie loves it. We also used liver treats when we were training for CGC classes. Just curious if anyone knows why cheese, liver, ham, and tuna would be on the list.
Thanks!
Connie
 

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:unsure: I just read this list of 20 things to never feed your pet in the Sunday, Sept. 2, 2007 edition of the Parade Magazine. The article was written by Karen Halligan, a veterinarian. :unsure:

1. Alcohol 2. Apple cores 3. Avocado 4. Bones 5. Caffeine
6. Cheese 7. Chocolate 8. Dough 9. Fat 10. Garlic
11. Grapes 12. Ham 13. Liver 14. Milk 15. Moldy food
16. Mushrooms 17. Onions 18. Potato peels 19. Raisins
20. Tuna


Some if this makes sense, but cheese? liver? if this were true, my two wouldn't have made it past 12 months. They get cheddar cheese and string cheese for training treats almost every day. And on special occasions--like shows, they get liver. and tuna? Yikes--Bites of tuna sandwiches and dried tuna from Tigertails are Pearl's fav. Maybe she's talking about feeding large amounts--liver and cheese are rich.
 

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Do they give any explanations?

I thought dogs didn't do well with dairy, which was a reason Frosty Paws was invented.
 

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Dogs supposedly don't have the enzymes needed to break down dairy products of any kind.

The tuna probably has to do with the fact that some types of tuna are known to have high levels of mercury.

As for the liver... no idea
 

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The liver might be because poisons that the body cannot break down
get stored in larger amounts there. Some heavy metals?? Anyway this
is not good for us people either.

I don't think that the list was very good. First, I think that it should be told
why not to feed those things. Second, some of those things has to be fed
in ridiculous large amounts over a long period of time in order to be
harmful. These things are good to know about, but I believe that crude
lists like that have a tendency to create uneccessary hysteria.

And come on, bones are _not_ on the to-not-feed list. One should just
take certain precautions. Never any kind of heated bones. give bones
that are the right size and have the right substance. Make sure that there
is enough meat on it. Remember not all dogs can be given bones, take
into consideration what kind of chewer your dog is. And lastly never give
bones unsupervised.

Mr. Rucible agrees :lol:
 

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That looks like one happy dog. :lol: Your post brings to mind the "The Phantom Gourmet" Tv show except it is a doggie version. The Phantom Gourmet is a local food critic that visits resturaunts all over Rhode Island. Perhaps Mr. Runcible can critique and rate commercial and homemade dog delicasies for us? I'm sure he'd be up for the task...
 

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Hello,

I'm sure the vet had her reasons but I can tell you that Jasper lived on whole milk after he had two back to back surgeries. He would not touch water or anything else we tried to give him, for a week and a half. On his recent yearly physical exam, the vet pronounced him to be very healthy. Also, he adores ham bones with bits of meat on them and the chewing helps keep his teeth and gums healthy.

jasperspet aka colleen
 

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Terry, I mentioned your idea for Mr. Runcible and he was
ecstatic about the idea. So here we go, his first critique and
a critique it is. I was ordering som essentials on the net like a
tooth scrape and a tick remover. I thought it would be nice if
Mr. Runcible actually knew that the parcel was for him when
it arrived so I added a smoked marrow bone to my order. To
put it this way it was no problem to get him to follow me inside
after I had visited my mailbox on arrival day. He thought it
smelled soooo gooood. I disagree, but I have no saying when
it comes to food stuff.

Oh, that heavenly smell - now I'm gonna eat it!



Mr. Runcible working on his bone. Accompanied by the sound of
teeth and bone grinding.



I know that it's supposed to be something scrumptious in the middle of
these things. And i can smell it!!! But i can't quite reach it.




Maybe this way...


The bone smelled wonderful and the expectations was high, but they weren't
met. Mr. Runcible feels that it is so wrong for a thing to smell like food , but then
not be eatable. He also know, from being fed raw bones, that it's
supposed to be marrow inside bones, that's the best thing about the whole bone
and the incentive to keep chewing. Marrows are healty but fattening so maybe
is something for the overweight dog. The smoked marrow bone sans marrow
held Mr. Runcible's attention for about 15 minutes. The good thing is that you can
take it away and give it to the dog again later.

Mr. Runcible feels that this was a case of not been given what the delicious smell
promised and subseqently gives it the thumb down.



The King has given his verdict!
 

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Kaira,

That was cute/funny!

~Heather
 

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... 1. Alcohol 2. Apple cores 3. Avocado 4. Bones 5. Caffeine
6. Cheese 7. Chocolate 8. Dough 9. Fat 10. Garlic
11. Grapes 12. Ham 13. Liver 14. Milk 15. Moldy food
16. Mushrooms 17. Onions 18. Potato peels 19. Raisins
20. Tuna ...

We are guilty of allowing Moe 25% of the listed items: caffiene (Moe LOVES Coffee and untended coffee doesn't last long), cheese, grapes, ham, and tuna. Cheese and ham VERY frequently... why are they not okay as treats or training rewards? :blink:
 

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http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/17919507/
Above is a link to an MSNBC article "Be Careful What You Feed Your Pets" which refers to the problem with feeding grapes (and some other things) to dogs:

Quote:
"Grapes and raisins seem to be a hazard specific to dogs. The ASPCA says they can cause kidney failure. “We don’t know why it happens. We don’t know what the toxic level is,” Steve Hansen tells me. “But it is well-documented that it does happen.”

Some dogs can eat grapes and raisins without ill effect. Others can get very sick after eating just a few. Because so little is known about the toxin involved, the ASPCA urges pet owners not to feed their dogs any grapes or raisins. In rare cases, that treat could kill your pet."
 

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answers to some of the questions. Again like mainy things when it comes to food it comes down to a matter of quanity.

here is a link to the article 20 Things You Should Never Feed Your Pet

1 tuna only pertains to cats taurine is not an efa for dogs as they can manufacture from other Fatty acids unlike cats.

2. Liver is high quanities only which causes vitamin A toxicity to get an idea what a large quanity constitutes see this article The Dangerous(?) Vitamin A "Vitamin A is one of the two vitamins in which oversupplementation can have negative effects. However, we have never seen a case of oversupplementation causing toxicosis, and in dogs, toxicity has been demonstrated only under experimental conditions. Toxic doses of Vitamin A could produce muscle weakness and bone abnormalities. Realistically, oversupplementation or toxicity is virtually impossible unless mega-doses are given for long periods of time (months to years).""

a 40=60 dog to possible have Vitamin a toxicity from eating liver it would need to consume 2/3 lb per day for at least 2 months.
Liver is not a high level risk by any means.


Cheese is put is the same catagory as milk because some not all pets are lactose intollerant. Hmm That logic if it were carried out to humans would be don't eat dairy because some are intollerant.

Fat is estential for a dog it comes down to quanity. It is documentent over wieght dogs are more prone to pancreatitis as are certain breed which lead to the conclusion that genetic play a part also but just how much fat is not clearly known from HIGH FAT RATIONS AND ACUTE PANCREATITIS "The precise mechanism that leads to the occurrence of acute pancreatitis in dogs has still to be fully elucidated. In one study dogs with liver disease fed a diet containing 77% fat on a dry matter basis developed acute pancreatitis1, however in another study2 sled dogs fed 66% fat for a 9 week period did not develop acute pancreatitis. The amount of fat needed to induce acute pancreatitis far exceeds the amount that is present in commercial pet foods (8-25%), but fatty foods (eg meat offcuts) should probably be avoided in dogs"

Ham the assumption that large intakes of water increase bloat risk are not born out in studies. Risk Factors for Canine Bloat "There was also no correlation to vaccinations, to the brand of dog food consumed, or to the timing or volume of water intake before or after eating."

At least with the Onion and garlic she does admit garlic is much less risky there are many Vets well veresed and studied in canine nutrition that the health benefits of garlic out weigh the risk factor especial if one keeps it below toxic level wich is the case unless the dog is heavy supplemented

fruit Pits see Hydrogen Cyanide"Cyanide is commonly thought of as a gas, but you also can be poisoned by it if you ingest wild cherry syrup, prussic acid, bitter almond oil, or large amounts of apricot pits. Cherry seeds, peach and plum pits, corn, chickpeas, cashews, and some other fruits and vegetables contain cyanogenic (i.e., cyanide-forming) glycosides (such as amygdalin) that release hydrogen cyanide when chewed or digested. As a result, some cyanide can also be found in fruit jams that contain these pit and pip extracts, such as quince. However, since the concentration of cyanide in these compounds is small, accidental cyanide poisoning from a food source is rare." and Cyanogenic Glycosides and Cyanide Toxicity It does not discuss toxic effects occurring in people consuming foodstuffs, other than one example, again with cassava. And again there are no case studies reporting death from consuming cyanogenic glycosides. Given the extensive list of references to this study, this is presumably because they were unable to find any. and the Merck Veterinary Manual Ruminants are more susceptible than monogastric animals


grapes http://www.dogbreedinfo.com/grapeandraisin.htm" target="_blank">Raisin and Grape Toxicity in Dogs</a>
"... of the 10 cases reported to the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center (APCC), each dog ingested between 9 ounces and 2 pounds of grapes or raisins." GRAPE AND RAISIN TOXICITY IN DOGS "At this time, the lowest documented
toxic grape or raisin dose is 0.32 to 0.65 oz/kg


Mushrooms that are toxic to dogs are also toxic to humans. I don't think many people are out there feed unknown mushrooms to their dogs.


Caffeine the toxicity level for caffeine is 100-200mg/kg. A standard 16 oz coffee contain between 140-250 mg of caffeine, a dog would have to drink nearly a 1/3 of its own body weight in coffee,

As is often the case in most cursory examinations of diet there is more hype than actual fact. If we were to remove every food that if overfeed could cause death well any animal would end up starving to death.
 

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Mikey T, thank you for taking time to write the above post. It was
a very interesting read. Articles like the one in that magazine are
not always to the better for owners and dogs, it's good that someone
brings some sense into it all ;)
 
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