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It looks like my parent's Basset, Gwynnie, has Paneosteitis. Apparently, all of the puppies in the father's litter had it, and now 6 of the 12 puppies in Gus and Gwynnie's litter have it. So far, so good on Gus, but we are keeping an eye on him.

Has anyone else had a Basset with Paneo? If so, what did you do to help them out during their growing pains?
 

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Cooter had pano as puppy. I noticed him limping and saw that I couldn't determine which leg was bothering him. We went to the vet, she took X-ray and yes, it was pano. Vet said that it will move from leg to leg, so on Monday his front right was hurting, but on Tuesday it was his front left. We got some Rimadyl from vet, on morning where he was limping and slow I gave him his meds. Some days he wouldn't need it at all. Also, I tried to limit his jumping during this time. He has grown out of it and all's well. Best of luck with Gus!
 

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Toughy spent close to 18 months with it traveling to each leg at least twice. The only thing that seems to help with the pain are nsaids like rimadyl but I did not use much because at the same time you are suppose to limit activity. It might be a cop-out but it is much easier to keep a dog on limited activity if they are not feeling 100% as opposed to when they do. It is something that they will eventual out grow so there is not much more than you can do but wait it out. FWIW pano is more common in males than females.

Panosteitis
Male dogs are much more likely to get panosteitis then females. There is a higher incidence in several breeds including German Shepherds, Great Danes, Doberman Pinschers, Golden Retrievers, Labrador Retrievers, Rottweilers, and Basset Hounds.
There is no specific treatment for the disease. Since this condition is often very painful, painkillers such as buffered aspirin or carprofen (Rimadyl) are recommended. (Do NOT give your cat aspirin unless prescribed by your veterinarian.) These products are used as needed to help control the pain. Antibiotics are not routinely used unless there are indications of concurrent infections. In severe cases, steroids are used, but because of the potential long-term side effects of these drugs, painkillers are often tried first. This disease is self-limiting and after it runs its course, there are very few long-term side effects or need for further treatment. As mentioned earlier, the disease usually lasts for two to five months, but can last much longer.
If an animal shows symptoms of the disease, they should be promptly diagnosed and treated and exercise and activity should be reduced until the symptoms have gone away.
 
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